The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

PG-13   |    |  Action, Adventure, Drama


The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) Poster

A meek Hobbit from the Shire and eight companions set out on a journey to destroy the powerful One Ring and save Middle-earth from the Dark Lord Sauron.


8.8/10
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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


14 April 2006 | bonnie91
10
| The Fellowship of the Ring: Not just a Movie, but the Door to another Dimension
The first part of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the Fellowship of the Rings opened the door to a whole new world for me. I'd never read any of Tolkien's books when I saw the film for the first time at the theatre and, now that I've read them, in retrospect I think being a neophyte to the mythology made my LOTR movie experience all the more miraculous.

I loved The Two Towers and Return of the King almost as much as FOTR, but not quite, because seeing Fellowship for the first time was like taking a journey to a fabulous new place and meeting incredible new friends that you don't want to leave. I've never felt anything quite like what this epic evoked in me. It was akin to being a child again, with that tireless sense of wonder and enjoyment of each and every moment, maybe because as a child you are discovering your surroundings, and whatever age you are, when you watch the Fellowship of the Ring you are rendered in awe upon being introduced to the purity and beauty of Middle Earth and darkly enthralled by the majesty of Eisengard, Saruman, Sauron and all of their mighty malice. One of the things that makes this movie so special (and there are so many!) is that you fall in love not only with the "good" characters, but also with the "evil" ones. For example, Christopher Lee was amazing as Saruman, and I can't imagine the movie without him.

Some films that might be comparable to the Lord of the Rings trilogy are: The Fifth Element, the Star Wars Trilogy parts IV, V and VI (forget the newer prequels), the Matrix trilogy (especially the first part), Interview with a Vampire, the Legend of Sleepy Hollow (with Johnny Depp), Logan's Run and The Island. They are all excellent movies and works of art that weave that movie magic that keeps you spellbound and entranced for the duration of their runtime.

But after seeing The Fellowship of the Ring, I knew I had found the movie by which I would judge all other movies. Based on J.R.R. Tolkien's beloved books, Peter Jackson has set a new standard in the industry of cinema, one that I honestly think has not and won't be surpassed, at least not in my lifetime, not even by PJ himself.

It is truly an instant classic that will stand the test of time and be loved by generations to come. God Bless Tolkien and Jackson and everyone involved in the conception and making of this film, for creating a world that is at my fingertips, only takes the touch of a button to go to whenever I want, and makes me forget everything else.

The LOTR Trilogy is undoubtedly MY precious, the non plus ultra of all movies!

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Jackson's original plan was to exclusively hire British actors for the roles of the hobbits. As it turned out, Billy Boyd and Dominic Monaghan were the only ones, and one of the tasks he charged them with was to coach Elijah Wood and Sean Astin in the ways of British pub culture.


Quotes

Galadriel: The world is changed. I feel it in the water. I feel it in the earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it. It began with the forging of the Great Rings. Three were given to the Elves, immortal, wisest...


Goofs

When Gandalf first appears riding on his cart, there is a long grey-green cloth hanging from the lantern on the right-hand side of the cart, with Gandalf's staff on the left. In the next shot, the lantern and cloth have switched sides with the staff (which itself moves back and forth between shots as Gandalf and Frodo travel into the village). It would seem that the first shot has been flipped so that the "road" bends round to the left to match the curve of the road as Gandalf approaches Frodo in the next shot.


Crazy Credits

After the end credits, the DVD and Blu Ray editions of the extended cut feature a list of "Lord of the Rings fan-club members" who contributed financially to the project in exchange for a credit. This additional credit sequence lasts 20 minutes.


Alternate Versions

The Extended Edition DVD includes the following changes to the film.

  • During the prologue, more is shown of the ambush and death of Isildur, emphasizing his betrayal by the Ring.
  • After the prologue, we open with a close-up of the Middle Earth map and pan to hear Bilbo writing his book, starting with a description of hobbits. Much of the Gandalf-Frodo dialog in their first scene together is removed, including the subtitle "60 Years Later".
  • When Gandalf and Bilbo are in Bag End, Bilbo notes that the people knocking on his door are the Sackville-Bagginses.
  • During the party, Bilbo greets a guest, then hides from the S.B's with Frodo. He tells Frodo how much the latter means to him.
  • After the Ringwraiths set out, the Hobbits (prominently Merry and Pippin) are shown dancing and singing in the Green Dragon Inn. References are made to troubles in the outside world and Frodo encourages Sam to pursue a relationship with Rosie Cotton.
  • After Frodo and Sam set out, they hear singing and find the woodelves leaving for the Gray Havens.
  • After the company leaves Bree, they pass through the Midgewater Marshes. Later, Aragorn brings a killed deer to the hobbits. Frodo wakes up late at night to hear Aragorn singing about Beren and Luthien.
  • The stone trolls from "The Hobbit" are shown.
  • Additional dialog between Aragon and Boromir during the "still sharp" scene with Narsil.
  • In the Council of Elrond, Boromir mentions his dream and reaches for the Ring. Gandalf recites the poem "One Ring to rule them all.." in black speech, causing the ground to shake and sun to go dark and provoking Elrond.
  • After the Council of Elrond, Aragorn visits his mother's grave and remembers Elrond telling him of his destiny. This is followed by another scene in which the company are sent off by Elrond and the elves.
  • Gandalf stops Frodo as they approach Moria to warn him about the Ring's power growing.
  • In the mines, Gandalf mentions mithril and lights up an old mithril mine. He notes the value of Bilbo's mithril shirt.
  • Additional fight scenes during the battle in the Chamber of the Marzabul.
  • Lothlorien is completely revised. The company are first on Haldir's left with the Elves distrusting Gimli and leery of Frodo.
  • Scene of the elves and the company approaching Caras Galadhon.
  • More dialog when Celeborn and Galadriel meet the company.
  • Sam recites a poem verse about Gandalf.
  • Galadriel acknowledges her possession of one of the elf-rings.
  • As the Fellowship leaves, Galadriel gives them each a personalized gift that will end up being critical to their future. Legolas gets a special bow, Sam gets some elven rope that comes in handy when he & Frodo make their way through the Emyn Muil, Frodo receives the Phial of Galadriel, and a touching moment occurs between Gimli and Galadriel.
  • Celeborn gives Aragorn a knife before they leave and warns them they are being tracked by something.
  • Boromir spots Gollum following the boats. Sam tries to get Frodo to eat or sleep. An exchange between Aragorn and Boromir about going to Minas Tirith before setting off for Mordor.
  • Extra action in the final battle.
  • An important extra line of dialog in Boromir's final scene.
  • 10-15 minutes of fan club credits during the final credits.


Soundtracks

The Song of Beren and Luthien
(uncredited)
Music by
Howard Shore
Lyrics by J.R.R. Tolkien
Performed by Viggo Mortensen

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Adventure | Drama | Fantasy

Details

Release Date:

19 December 2001

Language

English, Sindarin


Country of Origin

New Zealand, USA

Filming Locations

Fort Dorset, Miramar, Wellington, New Zealand

Box Office

Budget:

$93,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$47,211,490 23 December 2001

Gross USA:

$315,544,750

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$888,159,092

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