Don Juan (1998)

  |  Comedy, Romance


Don Juan (1998) Poster

Spain in the mid-seventeenth century. A series of bloody wars has ravaged the nation. Don Juan the nobleman and his valet, Sganarelle, roam the countryside on horseback, on the run and lost... See full summary »


4.8/10
420

Photos


See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


2 December 2007 | perspectiveoffice
7
| Excellent portrayal of Don Juan as a dirty old man
Aged lothario rides around Spain ogling young girls and drinking: Jacques Weber channels an aged Marlon Brando (at least in looks). His long wild hair, irreverent perspective on life, and degenerate old-aged girth (what a paunch!) give him (as Don Juan) the quintessential dirty old man look.

This is not the classic Don Juan, but portrays what Don Juan would be in his mid 50's -- an aging, fat, would-be lothario.

The movie is clearly the self-indulgent fantasy of Jacques Weber, who rides around on an absolutely splendid horse that is trained with all the classic horse-skills of Spanish riding. (I enjoyed watching the horse as much as anything in the movie!) He encapsulates the essence of an aged playboy wandering around the Spanish countryside trying to have flings with 20-year old girls. His nobleman father (who looks younger than Don Juan does and in fact has a far more grandiose lifestyle!) heartily disapproves. The movie is a biting satire of several very sad and real segments of society.

Don Juan himself degenerates into drink, eating too much, and an occasional swordfight. Over time he admits learns that the "worthy" honesty of being a playboy is less valued in society than stark hypocrisy. Although he gives in briefly to such hypocrisy (mostly to avoid a creditor), he never submits for very long.

He lives "well" (although mostly as a wandering vagrant) until his sudden dying day. Meanwhile his devoted and ostensibly devout servant (who lives vicariously through his master's excesses), becomes a beggar immediately upon Don Juan's death. Apparently, the moral is that the wages of pure devotion is beggardom, once your master dies.

There is liberal jabs at religious zeal, with the servant being the mouthpiece for an endless stream of confused religious aphorisms and trite sayings, which Don Juan ridicules.

This is anything but a Puritan moral story. It is an extremely real and penetrating glimpse into the soul of middle and old aged dirty old men, and as such is exactly right. It is a French film, and therefore portrays the human condition far more realistically than any American film could.

Did I see my own father (himself a middle/old-aged lothario) and many older men I know in Jacques Weber's Don Juan? You bet. In fact, my father saw himself accurately portrayed in the film, and he himself enjoyed it immensely for that reason.

This is a unique film in that regard, and is likely to be enjoyed more by those who have lived life well and love the intricacies of the human condition.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

The Rebel

The Rebel

Brujas

Brujas

The Greek Labyrinth

The Greek Labyrinth

Entre rojas

Entre rojas

Per amore, solo per amore

Per amore, solo per amore

La Celestina

La Celestina

Todo es mentira

Todo es mentira

A Corner of Paradise

A Corner of Paradise

Volavérunt

Volavérunt

Talk of Angels

Talk of Angels

The Girl of Your Dreams

The Girl of Your Dreams

Not Love, Just Frenzy

Not Love, Just Frenzy

Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Romance

Our Favorite Trailers of the Week

Get a quick look at the the week's big trailers, including The Lighthouse, Gretel & Hansel, Doctor Sleep, Jojo Rabbit, and Jexi.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Join us Sunday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT for IMDb LIVE After the Emmys, with exclusive interviews, and more. Plus, see what IMDb editors are watching this month.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com