The Laughing Woman (1969)

X   |    |  Thriller


The Laughing Woman (1969) Poster

A rich and sadistic man, who enjoys degrading women as part of elaborate S&M games, abducts a female journalist. She is subjected to his unpleasant games but soon begins subverting him.


7/10
709

Videos


Photos

  • The Laughing Woman (1969)
  • The Laughing Woman (1969)
  • The Laughing Woman (1969)
  • The Laughing Woman (1969)
  • The Laughing Woman (1969)
  • The Laughing Woman (1969)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


28 March 2007 | The_Void
7
| Curious sixties sexploitation flick
The Frightened Woman is a curious piece of Eurocult, much along the same lines as the films that Jess Franco was churning out around the same time. The film very much captures the feel of late sixties to early seventies European cinema and the atmosphere is definitely the film's best asset. It's lucky that the film will to appeal to fans of this sort of film too, as the idea behind the central plot line is pretty damn ridiculous! I'm not sure if there was some sort of paranoid science related thing happening in Italy in the late sixties, but films like this and the bizarre Giallo Death Laid an Egg suggest to me that something was going on... Anyway, our lead character, Dr. Sayer, has somehow got it into his head that women are taking steps to eliminate the need for men, and so he kidnaps a young lady named Maria. It turns out that he actually does this sort of thing all the time, and has got into the habit of killing his partner every time he has sex. However, things take a turn for the unexpected when Maria convinces him to change his ways.

Naturally, the entire film is really rather pointless; and while The Frightened Woman isn't exactly a thrill ride, there's still some interest. The speeches from the lead man are interesting in a completely nonsensical sort of way. The acting is typically trashy, although the leads; Philippe Leroy and Dagmar Lassander give decent leading performances considering the type of film. The majority of the film centres around the forced relationship between the two central characters, and this is somewhat the film's downfall. The problem is that what they're doing isn't always all that interesting; and the relaxed flow of the film means that it can become a bit dreary at times. The locations are good, however, and the bachelor pad in which most of the action takes place is a good representative of the period in which the film was made. As a 'battle of the sexes', it has to be said that The Frightened Woman veers more towards femininity, which is odd considering the way that women are usually treated in Eurocult cinema. Overall, I wouldn't recommend anyone going out of their way to find this film; but if you're a fan of trashy Jess Franco stuff, you might just like this too.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

Death Laid an Egg

Death Laid an Egg

The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh

The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh

Hatchet for the Honeymoon

Hatchet for the Honeymoon

Footprints on the Moon

Footprints on the Moon

The Case of the Bloody Iris

The Case of the Bloody Iris

The Forbidden Photos of a Lady Above Suspicion

The Forbidden Photos of a Lady Above Suspicion

The House of the Laughing Windows

The House of the Laughing Windows

The Fifth Cord

The Fifth Cord

The Case of the Scorpion's Tail

The Case of the Scorpion's Tail

Top Sensation

Top Sensation

The Bloodstained Butterfly

The Bloodstained Butterfly

Double Face

Double Face

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Thriller

Marlon Wayans Confesses His Biggest Watchlist Sin

The versatile comedic actor has his summer movie plans set but still has a little catching up to do when it comes to the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

See what IMDb editors are watching this month, and visit our guides to what's on TV and streaming, family entertainment, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com