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  • Warning: Spoilers
    Skye Weston (Elizabeth Perkins) works for a biotech company near Seattle. Alas, she is still grieving at the recent loss of her eight year old son Chris, an only child. Her husband Rick (Bradley Whitford) is also mourning but not as acutely. Chris' death occurred in a boating accident and, since then, Skye won't go on the water. Then, more bad news arrives when Skye learns that she won't be able to get pregnant again, not even with in-vitro, as with Chris. Talk about a depressed woman! At work, there are doctors on the cutting edge of cloning human organs, a very tricky ethical matter. Also, Skye's own doctor has a secret laboratory, which no one can enter. In addition, there are some really bad aces running the company, who value the almighty dollar before everything. Skye is oblivious to all of this until the day, on her first trip to a nearby island, she spies a boy WHO LOOKS JUST LIKE HER SON! How can this be? At first, upon introducing herself to the young lad, he is hustled away by his frightened mother. But, after a few gestures, the lady reveals that her in-vitro pregnancy was the result of Skye's own doctor. Huh. What's more, when Skye posts a picture of Chris on the Internet, five other families respond that he is identical to their sons, too. What is going on? Okay, you can probably guess the answer, when the film's story unfolds. Nevertheless, it is still an interesting premise. Perkins gives a nicely subdued performance while Whitford is mysterious enough to cause viewers to suspect him, too, at times. As a television movie, the flick's sports middling direction and dialogue. But, some of the scenery is terrific in the very beautiful Pacific Northwest. Also, the ending is wonderful, as the tables are turned on the bad guys, in very unique fashion. When rain is falling steadily outside on the day you planned a picnic, get this one. Its a fine couple hours of suspense.
  • em-582567 November 2018
    Warning: Spoilers
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