The Iron Giant (1999)

PG   |    |  Animation, Action, Adventure


The Iron Giant (1999) Poster

A young boy befriends a giant robot from outer space that a paranoid government agent wants to destroy.


8/10
167,889

Videos


Photos

  • Vin Diesel and Eli Marienthal in The Iron Giant (1999)
  • Allison Abbate and Brad Bird in The Iron Giant (1999)
  • Vin Diesel and Eli Marienthal in The Iron Giant (1999)
  • Allison Abbate and Brad Bird in The Iron Giant (1999)
  • Vin Diesel and Eli Marienthal in The Iron Giant (1999)
  • Vin Diesel and Eli Marienthal in The Iron Giant (1999)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Brad Bird

Writers:

Tim McCanlies (screenplay by), Brad Bird (screen story by), Ted Hughes (based on the book "The Iron Man" by)

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


11 December 2004 | Anansi00
9
| What more animated movie should be: a thoughtful, funny, touching story.
After seeing this movie, I was overcome by a strange feeling. I realized that I had found a treasure where I had least expected it. The Iron Giant is intelligent, funny, touching, and visually superb, and should show the world that an animated movie does not need to be A) computer-animated, or B) based on a fairy tale to be successful. One of the best American-made children's movies I have seen in a decade: 8.5/10.0

Now, I'm a 17-year-old who is slowly transitioning into the domain of movie buffdom, which basically means that I am watching a stream of movies based on recommendations from friends, critics, and the IMDb Top 250 list. I got this one almost by accident after the local rental place could not find the movie I was really after, choosing it basically on the knowledge that it was the previous project of Brad Bird, director of The Incredibles (a personal favorite). After watching it, I felt like calling up every mother I knew and telling her to have her children (and herself) watch this.

The Iron Giant revolves around an adventurous young boy in 1950s small-town America who discovers a gigantic robot out in the woods that has arrived on Earth from goodness-knows-where. He befriends the robot, while trying to keep him safe from a nosy government agent. The story seldom lags, with a series of comical adventures connected by the boy's growing relationship with his friend.

This movie is very appealing as entertainment. The voices are well-done, and the scenery is also terrific. Most importantly, though, is the animation, which is a bright spot from this time period. The characters are well-drawn, especially the Giant, who through terrific design, lifelike movements, and clever small touches (i.e., the eyes) seems both alien and human, imposing and childlike. Furthermore, the animation is comical. I don't know when I have ever seen slapstick or punchlines so well-complimented by the animation. The script, written by Bird and based off the book The Iron Man, is also very well done. Though the movie relies upon a few minor crutches common to children's movies, it is still very original and clever.

One thing that I must point out about this movie is its morals. Throughout the movie, the main moral of the story, about the Iron Giant learning and choosing to be good, is actually fairly adroitly handled. At no point when the subject comes up, including standard sentimental climax, does the idea seem contrived. Throughout the movie, evidence of Bird's influence by comic books is quite evident, and his ultimate message about heroes (variations of which will resurface in The Incredibles) is relevant and sincere. However, I do have to say that the secondary moral, about the evils of xenophobia and paranoia, both of which are embodied by the movie's antagonist, the government agent and the military, are very politically charged. While this may sound initially controversial and politically charged for a kids' movie (the second of which I do not deny), I noticed that it was in large part a thoughtful spoof of Cold War America, with jokes as well as valuable lessons about "duck and cover" and 1950s nuclear edginess that I found very clever.

On a final note, I do have to point out that this movie had me laughing hard, but more importantly, it brought me closer to tears than any animated movie I can remember (including Bambi), closer than I like to admit. I wish that I had discovered it sooner, and I hope that everyone gets the chance to experience it the way I did.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

The Nightmare Before Christmas

The Nightmare Before Christmas

The Incredibles

The Incredibles

Ratatouille

Ratatouille

Beauty and the Beast

Beauty and the Beast

Coraline

Coraline

Monster House

Monster House

Fantastic Mr. Fox

Fantastic Mr. Fox

Chicken Run

Chicken Run

Treasure Planet

Treasure Planet

Tarzan

Tarzan

Kubo and the Two Strings

Kubo and the Two Strings

A Bug's Life

A Bug's Life

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Animation | Action | Adventure | Comedy | Drama | Family | Sci-Fi

7 Hilarious Cold Opens From "The Office"

Extreme parkour, spilled chili, and way too much baby talk! Head back to Dunder Mifflin and relive the funniest moments that happened before the opening credits of "The Office."

Watch the video

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com