Fight Club (1999)

R   |    |  Drama


Fight Club (1999) Poster

An insomniac office worker and a devil-may-care soapmaker form an underground fight club that evolves into something much, much more.

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  • Selma Blair at an event for Fight Club (1999)
  • Fight Club (1999)
  • Brad Pitt and Edward Norton in Fight Club (1999)
  • Brad Pitt and Edward Norton in Fight Club (1999)
  • Tom Arnold at an event for Fight Club (1999)
  • Selma Blair at an event for Fight Club (1999)

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10 May 2000 | dr. gonzo
10
| a dangerously brilliant film that entertains as well as enlightens.
"Fight Club" an aggressive, confrontational, often brutal satire that is quite possibly a brilliant masterpiece. Taking the "Choose life," anti-consumerism rant at the beginning of "Trainspotting," and carrying it to its logical -- albeit extreme -- conclusion this is a big budget, mainstream film that takes a lot of risks by biting the hand that feeds it. The film's narrator (Edward Norton) is an insignificant cog in the drab, corporate machine, dutifully doing his job and what he's told without question. He's an insomniac slave to his IKEA possessions and only finds joy in going to as many self-help/dealing with terminal diseases sessions as he can. It provides him with an escape from his sleepless nights. That is, until Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter), a trashy chain-smoking poser, enters his life and upsets his routine. The narrator also meets Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), a charismatic soap salesman whose straightforward honesty, candor and sleazy lounge-lizard outfits are a breath of fresh air. One night, after the two men have bonded over beers, Tyler asks the narrator to hit him. At first, it seems like an absurd request but after they pound on each other for a bit, a strange feeling overcomes them. They feel a kind of release and satisfaction at inflicting pain on one another. In a world where people are desensitized to everything around them, the physical contact of fighting wakes them up and makes them feel truly alive. Others soon join in and pretty soon Fight Club becomes an underground sensation. However, it becomes readily apparent that Tyler has more elaborate plans than just organizing brawls at the local bar. David Fincher has taken the dark, pessimistic worldview of "Seven" and married it with the clever plot twists and turns of "The Game" and assembled his strongest effort to date. "Fight Club" is a $50+ million studio film that remains true to its anti-consumer, anti-society, anti-everything message -- right up to the last, sneaky subliminal frame. What makes "Fight Club" a subversive delight is not only its refreshing anti-corporate message but how it delivers said message. As Fincher has explained in interviews, you don't really watch the film but rather download it. Its structure is extremely playful as it messes around with linear time to an incredible degree. The narrative bounces back and forth all over the place like a novel, or surfing on the Internet -- even making a hilarious dead stop to draw attention to itself in a funny, interesting way that completely works. Yet Norton's deadpanned narration holds everything together and allows the viewer to get a handle on what's happening. This is the way films should be made. Why must we always have to go through the A+B+C formula? "Fight Club" openly rejects this tired, clearly outdated structure in favour of a stylized frenzy of jump cuts, freeze frames, slow motion and every other film technique in the book that only reinforces its anarchistic message. A film like this would have never been greenlighted by a major studio if Brad Pitt had not been attached to the project. Once you see the film, it becomes obvious that he was the only choice for Tyler Durden. Like he did with "Kalifornia" and "Twelve Monkeys", Pitt grunges himself down and disappears completely into his role to a frighteningly convincing degree. During many of the brutal fight scenes, he is transformed into a bloody, pulpy mess that'll surely have the "Legends of the Fall" fans running for the exits. It is an incredible performance -- probably his best -- for the simple fact that he becomes the character so completely. If Pitt has the flashy, gonzo role, Edward Norton is his perfect foil as the seemingly meek yet sardonic narrator. It's a deceptively understated performance as the last third of the film reveals but Norton nails it perfectly. He is clearly our surrogate, our introduction into this strange world and his wry observations on our consumer-obsessed culture are right on the money. They are the perfect setup for Tyler's introduction and his view on the world which is clearly a call to arms of sorts, a manifesto that rejects the notion that we are what we own. And ultimately, that is what "Fight Club" tries to do. The film is a cinematic punch to the head as it challenges the status quo and offers a wakeup call to people immersed in a materialistic world where those who have the most stuff, "win." I think that Fincher's film wants us to tear all that down, reject corporate monsters like Starbucks and Blockbuster, and try to figure out what we really want out of life. It's almost as if the film is suggesting salvation through self-destruction. And it is these thought-provoking ideas that makes "Fight Club" a dangerously brilliant film that entertains as well as enlightens.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

[1:07:42]After the Narrator leaves Marla's apartment just before he meets Bob (who tries telling him about Fight Club) there is a graffiti written the wall to his right that says "I LIKE MYSELF I LIKE MYSELF I LIKE MYSELF I LIKE MYSELF". Parts of it can also be seen as the Narrator and Bob talk.


Quotes

Woman on Plane: A new car built by my company leaves somewhere traveling at 60 mph. The rear differential locks up. The car crashes and burns with everyone trapped inside. Now, should we initiate a recall? Take the number of vehicles in the field, A, multiply by ...


Goofs

When The Narrator talks to his doctor, the x-ray on the wall behind him is not only back-to-front, but also upside-down.


Crazy Credits

The three police officers that try to cut off the narrator's testicles are credited as Officer Andrew, Officer Kevin and Officer Walker. Andrew Kevin Walker is the screenwriter who wrote Se7en (1995) and 8MM (1999). He also worked uncredited on David Fincher's The Game (1997) and on one of the drafts of Fight Club (1999). However, his contribution to the Fight Club script was not enough to warrant a credit by current WGA rules. Director David Fincher named the officers Andrew, Kevin and Walker, as a way of surreptitiously giving Walker a credit.


Alternate Versions

For the UK theatrical release of the film, the BBFC removed a total of four seconds from two scenes. In the scene where Lou (Peter Iacangelo) beats up Tyler (Brad Pitt), an overhead shot as Tyler receives a punch to the face is missing, and in the scene where The Narrator (Edward Norton) beats up Angel Face (Jared Leto), the third punch in the first load of hits, as well as several hits as his face becomes bloodied during the last load of hits have been removed. The BBFC argued that these cuts were made because of "excessively sustained violence" and "an indulgence in the excitement of beating a defenseless man's face into a pulp". Interestingly however, prior to the release of the film, the BBFC was petitioned to ban the film the film altogether, but they refused, disputing claims that it contained "dangerously instructive information" and could "encourage anti-social behavior". In fact, they actually came to the defense of the film, pointing out that "the film as a whole is - quite clearly - critical and sharply parodic of the amateur fascism which in part it portrays. Its central theme of male machismo (and the anti-social behavior that flows from it) is emphatically rejected by the central character in the concluding reels." For the 2007 Definitive Edition DVD re-release of the movie in the UK, all previous cuts were waved, and the film was released with the deleted four seconds reinstated.


Soundtracks

Coffee Shop Zak
Composed by
Rolfe Kent
Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

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