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  • ecwjedi12 January 2005
    Angel is a show that is going to live forever because it never gave in and changed itself around in order to be more friendly for the masses. I have no intention of giving each season or episode a number evaluation as I feel the entire body of the show is whats important. Well thought out story arcs were the norm in this amazingly diverse world inhabited by the most fleshed out characters on any TV show. A perfect example of this is the character Wesley who started as the comedic sidekick and slowly, over the seasons, transformed into a certifiable bad-ass without ever coming across as forced. Angel never treated the view like an idiot, never wrapped everything up in a nice little package after every show only to forget about the previous events in the next episode. Angel also never got stale, in part because it was cancelled in its prime by the WB for no solid reason as it was one of the highest rated shows on the network. Every season seemed to get a little better with the fifth, and final, season being the best, in my humble opinion. The show has become like an old friend to me which I can visit from time to time to remember what TV should strive to be like and to see an example of great story telling. In a time when TV is turning into a wasteland of trends and shows that do nothing but recycle, Angel was a bright spot which has sadly gone out. Buy the DVDs and let the show live forever as most of what else is on TV is already dead.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    When I heard that Angel was leaving the show, I was heartbroken. When I heard that he would have his own show, I was a little happier, but still worried. Could it at all compare to the genius of Buffy? As soon as I saw the first episode, one thing came to mind: "This is different from Buffy." Remember, dear children, different does not always mean bad. I love Angel almost as much as Buffy (and sometimes more). These characters are more grown-up than Buffy's, which can be good, but also takes away the youthful, naive, happy-go-lucky, pop culture referencing fun. It does, however, have its own charm. For instance, the long feud with lawyers Wolfram and Hart, the Karitas karaoke bar, and all their witty puns and entendres. This show has gone its own way, and in my opinion, it's all good.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    One word:fantastic. It sums up Angel perfectly, it is that rarity, a spin-off show that is better than the series that it came from and that really is saying something. Everything about this show is perfect. The casting, the writing, the directing, the special make up effects, I can't say enough about it. Coming along during Buffy's fourth season when it started to flounder, it made it's sister series look bad by being better. Whereas Buffy started to use the gimmick (silent episode, musical episodes) and whereas they were very, very, good (they were written and directed by Joss Whedon after all), Angel was just being a great show that was telling great stories. Doyle's sacrifice, Darla's pregnancy, Holtz's revenge, Wesley's betrayal, the apocalypse and Cordy turning evil, all of these and more were fantastic moments that catapulted some of the most devious plotting constructed for a television show. While Joss himself has only written and directed about four episodes, it has been left to David Greenwalt and Tim Minear to steer this show into the classic realm of television and over the course the last two seasons it has really stepped out of the shadow of its sister show and has really stood well on it's own two feet.

    While Buffy went of to a new channel, in this case UPN, Angel remained at its home of WB and this splitting of the two shows was more in favor of Angel, creatively. It allowed Angel to become its own show which it did magnificently. The fight scenes became really spectacular (just check out the sped up film look during the early half of season three and the Matrix style slow-mo in the second half) and the story arcs became more inspired. The inclusion of a pregnant Darla and the character of Holtz, whose family was killed by Angel over one hundred years ago, led to a fantastic third season, which had a fantastic, yet shocking conclusion, while season four was the best wielding the biggest story arc of it's history which pitted the gang against the Beast, an evil Cordy and eventually Jasmine, played fantastically by Gina Torres.

    The cast has also developed sublimely over the past four seasons. The inclusion of a supporting cast created especially for the show like Gunn, Fred and Lorne (my favorite of them all) has led to a fantastic ensemble, while Angel, Cordy and Wesley have all developed in wonderful ways over the past four seasons, while Glenn Quinn was superb in his nine episode stint in the first season. What a shame he died so young.

    If you have yet to treat yourself to the delights of this show, please do, because that is exactly what it is. A treat.
  • What can i say different from any other 'Angel' fan. This was one of the best shows around from 1999-2004. Great acting by David Boreanez (who carried Angel forward) and from the rest of the cast. Excellent story lines telling of Angel's path to redemption; and, flashbacks that reveal to us his former evil life that brought people suffering, torture and death when he did not have a soul. Great development of the Wesley character. Much better than Buffy and worth owning on DVD. There was the occasional bad episode but the many good ones made up for it. Watch it and cherish it.

    Catch the re-runs when they come on. It's worth it.

    My vote = 9/10
  • Rioter26 January 2002
    When Angel (David Boreanaz) left Buffy: The Vampire Slayer for good in 1999, there was some concern over whether or not he'd be able to carry his own show. Certainly, the tortured vampire is a powerful character, but he seemed dependent on Buffy's (Sarah Michelle Gellar) presence, and the supporting cast seemed to be made up of the fat trimmed off Buffy: TVS after the end of the high school years.

    Now, as Angel: The Series is in its third season, and Buffy: TVS in its sixth, those concerns seem unfounded. Angel is now, arguably superior, though it lacks the audience of the original show. The supporting cast has been fleshed out, most notably in the case of Cordelia Chase. (Charisma Carpenter) Once a snobby, Sunnydale rich girl, the Los Angeles years have turned Cordelia into a genuine, loving person. Angel and Cordelia are joined by Wesley Wyndham-Pryce (Alexis Denisof), a fallen Watcher, and another Buffy alum, Charles Gunn (J. August Richards) a vampire-hunting former gang member, and alternate-dimension refugee Fred Burkle (Amy Acker).

    While it seems the original series is showing its age, Angel has been in high gear for nearly three complete seasons. The show lacks the goofy humor of Buffy, instead opting for a darker tone, as the characters strive for redemption and direction in a city that seems to encourage neither. Now that Buffy has moved away from the WB, fans have to go out of their way to continue to watch Angel. Do so, because it is certainly worth the effort.
  • I've been following the Buffy series until the end,so when I heard of this 'spin-off' I was actually pretty psyched about it.Damn it was I wrong.This show completely blows off the doors of it's predeccesor in many ways,mainly the ambiance.It's not so cutesy as Buffy,but it has an awesome sense of humor and character development.It's really great seeing Angel change through out the show.Every character evolves,but Wesley was the most drastic change of all.He goes from a wimpy guy to this battle-hardened warrior.Everything about this show should appeal to people:awesome battles,amazing characters,incredibly funny humor,and a great,cohesive story that never seems to contradict itself.This series rocks more than anything that has ever rocked before.David Boreanaz,dude you really outdid yourself.
  • When the show premiered back in 1999 fans were introduced to a show that was dark, edgy, intelligent, and just plain awesome in all the ways that a television show should be. Angel was not just an hour of entertainment, it was something that made your life better when you watched it. And in the course of half a decade the show presented brilliant characters, extraordinary stories, amazing dialogue, and last but not least, possibly the best show ever to hit television. It was for all these reasons that its loss left many fans heartbroken.

    But if there was one thing that Angel made perfectly clear it is that the fight never ends. The story of the tortured vampire with a soul, Angel, unfortunately did not meet its end, since the evil WB took it off the air. So the rest of the life, or unlife, as I should say, of the infamous vampire with the soul was left up to the fans to finish the story of Angel in any way that they liked.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"'s loss was...someone's gain. When David Boreanaz left the cult series following Season Three, and his character acquired his own spin off, BtVS suffered a loss from which it would never fully recover. Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter), who went with Angel, could be replaced, but Angel himself left a void that was never filled, despite the best efforts of Mark Blucas (Riley) and James Marsters (Spike). Luckily, the spin off that drew Boreanaz away from "Buffy" would become as good, if not better, than BtVS in it's prime.

    Season One of "Angel" begins with Angel moving to Los Angeles, and quickly picking up two helpers in the fight against evil; fellow former resident of Sunnydale Cordelia Chase, and emissary of the mysterious Powers That Be Allen Francis Doyle (Glenn Quinn). Doyle receives visions from the Powers, directing the team at Angel Investigations (Angel's detective agency) to help. Doyle bit the bullet nine episodes in (Quinn left the series for reasons that have always been vague), and his replacement was a third former "Buffy" castmember, Watcher turned rogue demon hunter Wesley Wyndham-Price (Alexis Denisof. Of all the characters to join the cast over the years, none were more significant than Denisof. The last three episodes also featured J. August Richards as Charles Gunn, who would join the cast in Season Two. Recurring characters included; Detective Kate Lockley (future "Law & Order" regular Elisabeth Rohm), a police officer who would come to acquire substantial interest in the occult; Darla (Julie Benz), an evil vampire from Angel's past who appeared mostly in flashback; Lindsey McDonald (Christian Kane), an attorney with the evil law firm of Wolfram & Hart; Lilah Morgan (Stephanie Romanov), another W & H attorney; and Holland Manners (Sam Anderson), the nefarious W & H executive who oversaw the handling of Angel. Wolfram & Hart (and the unseen Senior Partners) would become the series's defining villain, represented through numerous attornies. The first season was mostly standalone episodes, with three crossovers with parent series "Buffy", and the series-length story arc involving Wolfram & Hart.

    Season Two began where Season One had left off, with W & H resurrecting Darla and Gunn joing Angel Investigations. Darla, Angel's lover for 140 years, plays mindgames with her former flame. After she is turned back into a vampire (she was resurrected as a human), by none other than Drusilla (Juliet Landau), Angel goes dark and abandons the other members of his team, leaving them to carry on the fight by themselves. As Angel deals with Darla and Drusilla, the attornies at W & H continue their maneuvers, even as they experience considerable blowback from past operations. After the resolution of the Darla story arc, the series bid goodbye to Lindsey (for now) and Kate (for good), and then took a detour into the alternate dimension of Pylea. In Pylea, home of Lorne (Andy Hallet) [an ally introduced in the second season premiere], the gang meets the next addition to their cast, Winifred 'Fred' Burkle (Amy Acker). The end of the second season also marked a major change for the series, as its parent show departed the WB for another network, meaning that all future crossovers were nearly impossible. From thence forth, "Angel" must stand alone.

    Season Three marked the show's descent into the darkness that would envelope it for the next two years, with things becoming somewhat brighter in the final year. Angel and Darla had had sex in Season Two, and, defying all known mystical rules, two vampires had conceived a child. That the child appeared to to be a major harbinger of destruction only made things more perplexing. Darla died in giving her son life, and Connor (as he was called) became the centre of his father's universe. But he also entered the radars of several powerful foes, notably Wolfram and Hart (now represented by Lilah, Gavin Park [Daniel Dae Kim] and Linwood Murrow [John Rubinstein]) and time-traveler Sahjahn (Jack Conley). Sahjahn, whom Connor was fated to kill, enlisted Daniel Holtz (Keith Szarabajka), an 18th Century vampire hunter with a massive vendetta against Angel and Darla. Meanwhile, Sahjahn's tampering with archaic prophecies caused a schism between Wesley and Angel. Holtz escaped with Connor to a demon dimension, even as Angel temporarily defeated Sahjahn. Meanwhile, Angel began to grow closer to Cordelia, and Gunn began a relationship with Fred. But a now teenaged Connor made his return from the demon dimension, stoked with a lifetime of horrific stories about his father. Connor's need for vengeance would culminate in the season finale, which saw Cordelia ascending to a higher plane, and Angel imprisoned deep in the ocean.

    Season Four was the pivotal season of "Angel", where arcs that had spanned the entire series came into play. Even as Wesley rescued Angel from the ocean floor, a mysterious demonic foe know simply as The Beast (Vladimir Kulich) arose. After only a few episodes unseen on the higher plane, Cordelia appeared to return without much memory what had occurred; but the motives behind her return, and indeed behind the actions of the Powers (or specifically, one rogue Power) were much more insidious. The Beast was revealed to be a lacky of that rogue Power, who was using Cordelia to control her descent to Earth. After a brief arc that saw the returns of Angel's evil alter ego Angelus and vampire slayer Faith (Eliza Dushku), the Power was revealed as Jasmine (Gina Torres). Jasmine had orchestrated all the events leading up until that point, and now planned to bring her own strange peace to Earth that involved stripping mankind of free will and condemning them to banally happy lives. This season marked the death of Lilah, and ended with Cordelia leaving the main cast. After defeating Jasmine, Angel and Connor had one final confrontation, with Connor lost and reeling, and looking to die. Angel, desperate to help his son, struck a deal with the Senior Partners, whereby they gave Connor a new life and removed his memories of his past life, and also removed the memories of the rest of Angel's team; in exchange, Angel assumed control of the Los Angeles branch of Wolfram & Hart, becoming an employee of his mortal enemies.

    Season Five saw massive changes to the show, with the gang now running Wolfram & Hart, and the addition of Spike (James Marsters) to the cast, replacing Cordelia. Spike, another "Buffy" transplant, became the series's second most important character, and he and Angel became the undead Starsky and Hutch; two souled vampires, two crusaders for good. Boreanaz and Marsters played off each other expertly, and the Angel/Spike rapport became one of the best features of Season Five. Season Five was the first season since Season One that seemed to lack a major plot arc, although a miniarc involving the return of Lindsey surfaced by the eighth episode. The series celebrated its one hundredth episode in Season Five, which featured the demise of Cordelia, and the defeat of Lindsey. But there was a major jolt coming, when Fred was consumed and replaced by an ancient demon named Illyria. Fred's death galvanized the series (as did the announcement that Season Five would be the final season), and the march towards the explosive series finale began. The series finale, Not Fade Away, featured Angel and co. going against he Senior Partners' chief servants on Earth, to demonstrate that they could not be controlled. The plan would in all likelihood mean their deaths, but the heroes had come to realize that the fight was what mattered. Wesley died in battle with sorcerer Cyvus Vail (Dennis Christopher), while the others completed their tasks; Lorne departed, the fight having become too bleak for his jovial soul. Angel, Spike, Gunn, and Illyria met up in a rainy alley, where the were confronted with the furious forces of Wolfram & Hart...and that was where the series ended, with Angel and his champions charging into battle, with their defeats all but assured; but the fight needed to be fought.
  • I usually prefer "Angel" over "Buffy" - darker, complex characters; a minimum of quirky Scooby-speak; and it's more violent, definitely more violent.

    David Boreanaz carries the show well. His character is more interesting when he's darker. Unfortunately, he wouldn't have a supporting cast if he remained that way. Charisma Carpenter, who played a relatively two-dimensional character for 3 years on "Buffy", really comes into her own on this show, adding depth to Cordelia and proving that she can act rings around Sarah Michelle Gellar. Alexis Denisof has done a good job of making me forget that Wesley was an uptight, stiff-upper-lip comedic relief in the previous series, and turned him into a more likeable, stronger character - almost a younger version of Giles. Recently, the writers have been ignoring Gunn in favor of regular guest stars Lindsey and Darla. Now maybe that particular story arc is over, they'll give J August Richards more to do.

    This series is strong and deserves to stand on it's own merits, not simply as a "spin-off".
  • Angel is a surprise to watch after getting through the Buffy the Vampire series. They're not really alike, except that both shows have weekly monsters (or sometimes do, other times focusing on mishaps with the central characters) and the 'Big Bad' (in this case, for a while, law-firm Wolfram & Hart). While Buffy chronicles what it's like for a young woman becoming a hero, the saga of being a kind of superhero with super strength but still being a regular human being, Angel is about its own hero of sorts, a vampire who has been "cursed" to help others and has a soul. So, he goes to Los Angeles, teams up with a few people- Cordelia, from Buffy, and Doyle (who didn't last long), Wesley (who did last long), and Gunn, a street hood who is his own kind of slayer- and opens up a kind of detective agency "to help the hopeless".

    Usually when I look at Joss Whedon's TV shows, a lot of them rely best on a central arc carrying over the series episode to episode (one saw how this worked so well on Buffy and with a little more trouble on Dollhouse). This isn't to say that episodes don't flow together or have strong story lines (they often do, and the sub-plots with Wesley, Cordy and eventually Gun are always involving). But here though it's episodic first, arc second, and this actually works out really well. While the "Big Bad" of the season isn't always out of reach, what we look forward to on Angel is seeing what case he has to solve next, what monster he'll have to fight or what person/non-person he'll have to save. And meanwhile the constant is him trying to be a little more compassionate and caring while also being a dark brooding vampire who on occasion, if he achieves true happiness, becomes the evil 'Angelus' vampire. This isn't as confusing as it sounds (a vampire who becomes... an evil vampire?)

    What also helps is that Whedon and co-creator David Greenwalt always put in a sense of humor about things, be it the nightclub run by green-skinned Fred where the demons sing (and Angel gets to belt out "Mandy"), or in some of the wisecracks from the characters. There's also some fantastic action and fights- or, sometimes not- and there's the usual lot of crappy CGI that one saw on Buffy too. But what makes it constantly enjoyable is the film-noir aesthetic: Angel is a little like a Raymond Chandler leftover doused in a touch of Batman and left out to do his thing in seedy LA. The characters are fun and convincing, and even when they're not (take season four for example, a lot of it), a good juicy villain or memorable moment is around the corner.

    Angel was a successful spin off, running for five seasons, and when one gets into just the first two seasons it's easy to see why. It's more Whedon-esquire goodness on display, with an oddly charismatic David Boreanaz in the lead (improving/building much upon his character on Buffy).
  • With that in mind, this is an excellent show. While I do not feel that Angel has necessarily bested Forever Knight yet, I think that it very well might. The show manages to balance the fearsomeness of the supernatural undertones with a certain exuberance and delight that I am definitely impressed with. The show can be truly funny.

    Angel is not a typical horror show, as it deals much more with human relations than it deals with the supernatural. And it deals with human relations in a much more mature and intelligent manner than most so-called dramas on TV. I must admit that I was skeptical when I heard all the praise being heaped on this show by critics before it started, but they were right. Between Angel and Buffy, I don't really think that any other network touches the WB for pure creative output.

    I am impressed with the direction that this station has taken, and hope that they continue in the future.
  • If you asked me a year ago what Angel was then i wouldn't of have a clue, now it's 1 of my favorite shows.

    I never had much interest in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the story sounded pretty much stupid, i mean a teenage girl with superhuman powers doesn't really sound that great, at least not to me.

    I started watching it about a year ago though, the first 4 seasons were being repeated late at night, and since there wasn't much on i started to watch it, all characters were decent, but really nothing special, except for Angel, this guy had a past, a real mission, he was hurt by his past and tried to do good in the world, to redeem himself.

    The series Angel is nothing like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, it's much more mature and dark, they don't fight because they have to, but they fight because they choose to, every single one of them risk their life to help the helpless.

    The action is good, the comedy is great and so is the drama, they did a excellent mix of the 3, the sets and make-up are very professional, and the character development has been done very well, overall i just have nothing bad to say about this show, except it being cancelled after 5 seasons, 1 of the biggest mistakes ever.

    Personally i think everyone should see the first few episodes, i'm sure there are people out there that won't like it, but don't let the idea of demons and all keep you away from this show, it's truly 1 of the best shows around and deserves to be checked out by everyone.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Angel starts out where Buffy The Vampire Slayer season 3 left off, with Angel, a vampire with a soul, leaving Sunnydale so that his beloved Buffy can have a semblance of a normal relationship, which the two of them could never have. The entire series can be divided into three parts, all of which take place in L.A., Angel's new home.

    The first part consists of season one, and does not have a defining story arc. In season one, Angel starts a supernatural detective agency, "Angel Investigations", with the help of Cordelia Chase, who has moved to L.A. from Sunnydale, and half human-half demon Doyle. Doyle dies a courageous death half-way through the season, and failed ex-watcher Wesley Windham-Pryce, who is now a "rogue demon hunter", joins the cast. At the end of the season we are introduced to Charles Gunn, a streetwise kid who has been fighting demons his whole life. Slowly, he comes to trust Angel and eventually joins the group.

    The second part of the series consists of seasons two through four, and is one long story arc. Season two deals with the resurrection of Angel's vampire lover Darla. The ordeal of getting Darla back as a human, and then losing her again when she becomes a vampire once more, drives Angel to the dark side of his soul. He turns against his friends for a brief time as he goes on a crusade of punishing the guilty - Wolfram & Hart - rather than helping the helpless. Eventually he returns to his friends and his senses - but not before he and Darla have a night of passion that results in season three's story arc - Darla's pregnancy and the "birth" of Angel's son Conner.

    In season 3, an old enemy from Angel's vampire past is mystically conjured up - Holtz, a man whose entire family was killed by Angel and Darla when they were both vampires. Holtz' revenge involves stealing Angel's infant son and jumping into a portal to a hell dimension rather than give up the child. Later in season three, Conner and Holtz both return from the hell dimension. With time running differently in the two dimensions, Conner is now 18 years old, and none too fond of Angel, due to Holtz' influence. Holtz conjures up a plan to commit assisted suicide and make it look like he has been murdered by Angel so that Conner will take revenge on him. The plan works, and Conner sinks Angel to the bottom of the Pacific in a box, to suffer an everlasting torment of slow starvation.

    Season four is the most disorganized of any of the seasons. It is a dizzying blur that involves a mysterious Beast that blots out the sun, yet another mystical pregnancy that culminates in an evil higher power - Jasmine - coming into the world, and that evil power bringing "world peace" in return for the world's unquestioning worship - until Angel enables people to see Jasmine's true appearance and they run from her in horror. The season concludes with Angel and his crew being given control of the L.A. branch of evil mystical law firm Wolfram & Hart supposedly as a reward for "destroying world peace". Angel agrees to the deal, if in return all memories of Conner's existence are erased from everyone who knew him and Conner is placed in a "normal" family with memories that involve only his new family, and not his actual past. Only Angel retains his memories of what actually happened.

    Season five stands alone as the third and final part of the series which returns to the monster-of-the-week format that was present in season one. Spike, another vampire with a soul who also loves Buffy, appears first as a ghost that is unable to leave the premises of Wolfram & Hart. Later in the season Spike reclaims his corporeal presence. The first part of the season is on the light side, as each member of the Fang Gang receives their dream job at Wolfram & Hart with the hope of doing good deeds in a place once renowned for evil. However, they slowly discover that it is they that are being changed and compromised, not the law firm. This culminates in one great tragedy two-thirds into the season, resulting in the death of one the members of the Fang Gang. In the end, Angel and his crew decide to turn the tables by killing all of the members of a powerful evil secret society. They are successful, but there are casualties among their ranks. The last scene shows the survivors cornered in an alley about to be attacked by Wolfram & Hart's minions, but they go out fighting.

    Angel is not the only character on a journey in this series. The once shallow and selfish Cordelia Chase changes into a brave soul who is willing to become part demon in order to continue on in her mission. We also watch as Wesley changes from buffoonish comic relief into a true rogue demon hunter who has a penchant for darkness that rivals Angel. Charles Gunn changes from the street-wise kid who is proud of being the muscle into someone who is willing to sell his soul to not to return to that role. Even Lorne is not spared, as he changes from the consummate entertainer with an ever-sunny personality into someone who can only find solace at the bottom of a glass and loses his heart for the good fight "the moment I found out a girl I loved was going to die".
  • I was surprising pleased after watching the first episode of Angel. Since it was a spin-off, I did not expect it to be nearly as good as Buffy the Vampire Slayer. But I was proven wrong. Angel and Cordelia have both improved in characters from their original roles on Buffy. Doyle is a terrific character, often stealing the scene. The way Angel runs his little "operation" is very cool. It's definitely got potential to be far better than Buffy. It's got vampires, demons, good looking girls, weapons, car chases and Mafia-like bad guys! What more could you want?
  • You could say we have Buffy to thank for Angel having his own show and you would be right there. But that's where it stops cause since the start of the show it was been nothing like Buffy. Don't get me wrong I am not bashing on Buffy I love that show also but when I comes down to it I would watch Angel over Buffy. However Did like how in season one and through almost all five seasons they tied some shows together with each other.Which made you want to watch both shows even more. this comment may not be that helpful to most but that's okay you'll just have to buy the seasons and see what I am talking about and believe me they are worth every dollar
  • This is definitely the most underrated series i have seen. A series this good should easily have been given a rating of above 9.0. I have watched many series including Lost, Prison Break, The Shield, The Wire, The Walking Dead, Dexter But non of them are as dark, emotional and addicting as Angel. I wished this series could have continued 5 seasons are not enough for a story line so intriguing and perfect. Each and every element of the series is Perfect especially the intro music. Its my favorite music and definitely the most dark and addicting music ever. You might not like the first few seasons but please watch it to the end because after you finish the last episode I bet you'd agree with me that Angel is the best series there ever will be.................

    Angel FTW
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Today, everywhere I look there are vampires. They are all in struggle because they love some mortal girl, or just fighting each other for some reason. I like vampire stories, but those above are empty, boring, and pretty much the same. The last good movie I saw was Interview With The Vampire. I knew nothing about Buffy the Vampire Slayer or David Boreanaz. But then last December I started watching Boreanaz' current TV Show Bones, and after a few episodes I was hooked. Friends told me about Angel, so I got curious. I thought, if it's just another teenager show, I can stop anytime. So there I was, a little worried what I might see. But Angel got under my skin in the very first moment, and made me care about his beautiful, tortured soul. It dragged me down, but in a sweet way, made me cry for him, be happy with him, laugh at him, and sometimes even hate him. He fights for a better world, for us, for his friends and for himself. Last night I've finished the last episode, and I am sad it is over. But Angel left us with a very important note: There is still good in the world, that is worth fighting for. No matter what. I will do anything to by the DVDs and return to him whenever I want to. If you are like me (too late) and haven't seen it yet, you should take the time, you won't regret it. Of course you must be able to read between the lines and not only looking for blood and action. Now I will begin to watch Buffy to see how it all began. For those of you who understand: enjoy! And if you're not, feel free to use your remote.

    (Please forgive my bad English)
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I hate to admit this, but I didn't think "Angel" was going to fly from the beginning. To me, Angel was strictly a secondary character to Buffy. How can they build a whole show on a sidekick? Boy, was I wrong! And how great that I was wrong! Angel is a much darker, much edgier show than Buffy. Even though Angel was suppose to be a good vampire now, he was still capable of doing some rather awful, jaw-dropping acts. How can anyone forget the episode where he locked all the lawyers of Wolfram & Hart in the wine cellar with two blood thirsty vampires? Angel didn't only not save the humans, when he walked out the door, he locked the door behind him! This is something Buffy would never do. Buffy would never allow a human being to be killed. But Angel, who knows how bad any kind of evil can be, be it demon or human, boldly deals with it.

    Angel is a bundle of contradictions, but he is always on the side of good, no matter what. As this show progresses, it gets darker and darker and more darkly humored until the final episode.

    The special effects are very well done. The actors are all exceptional in this show. The biggest downers was when Charisma Carpenter left the show and that they never brought back Glenn Quinn as Doyle. It's a real shame about Glenn Quinn. To me, he'll always be Roseanne's son-in-law and Angel's first sidekick, Doyle.

    The last season was very well done. The addition of James Marsters as Spike was one of the best things to happen to this show. Too bad this show ended before Angel and Spike's most difficult love/hate relationship could be explored further.

    "Angel" is a great series to own for people who enjoy both horror, comedy and drama in the same show.

    Highly, highly recommended!
  • Warning: Spoilers
    OK, this show never dissembled to the masses. In the episode I just watched Lorne says "bon mot" come on...how many shows let their characters use words/phrases 90% of the population has never heard? They make fun of themselves and refer to prior events - even as far back as Buffy. I love that sense of continuity. But the best, the very best part of this show is the dialogue. It's quick, intelligent and delivered by skilled words-men. Now, for the best scene ever in any show on TV, it is in Not Fade Away the very last episode and it takes place between Wesley and Fred/Illyria. It had me sobbing and even had my tough grown son tearing up - on his second or third viewing. It's really wonderful! If you are looking for entertainment, to be captured by characters, to have your imagination tweaked (but not your intelligence insulted), to spend an hour and not see the time go by...Angel is it. Rent it from year one to year five and you will not be sorry - except that it ended. (then go do the same with Firefly...you'll be outraged it ended in it's first season!) Have fun!
  • The story of Angel (David Boreanaz) is a great television show. My wife is a great fan of this series and I decided to buy the imported DVD box of the first season as a gift for her. I watched the first episode, than the second one, the next one... and yesterday I finalized! The plot is based in Angel, a private investigator, living in the present days, who fights against demons, fiends and vampires in Los Angeles. The details is that he is also a vampire, but with a soul. Through flash backs, the viewer sees that some two hundred years ago, Angelous was a common guy seduced by Darla (Julie Benz), and became a vampire after being bitten by her. He killed his father, his mother and his sister. One day, he had a beautiful gypsy girl as a gift from Darla. He killed the girl, and he got a curse from her gypsy family: he would have a soul. Since then, he fights against demons, mostly in Los Angeles, where he lives in the present days. In his agency, his employees and best friends are Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter) and Doyle (Glenn Quinn, in the first episodes). However, this actor died in real life due to an OD and was replaced by Wesley (Alexis Denisof). Along the first season, Angel meets detective Kate (the German actress Elisabeth Rohm, one of the most beautiful actress I have ever seen on the screens), the Oracles, and lots, but lots of demons, fiends and vampires. He also fights against Faith and the lawyers from Wolfram & Hart. Further, the theme of Angel played by violin is wonderful. The actor David Boreanaz, with his cool style, fits perfectly to the main character. My vote for the whole series is eight. My vote regarding each episode (and the date I watched each one of them) is: 1) City Of (17 May 2003): nine 2) Lonely Heart (17 May 2003): eight 3) In the Dark: (18 May 2003): six 4) Fall to Pieces (18 May 2003): seven 5) RM W/A VU (19 May 2003): eight 6) Sense and Sensitivity (19 May 2003): eight 7) The Bachelor Party (29 Jun 2003): six 8) I Will Remember You (30 Jun 2003): nine 9) Hero (14 Sep 2003): ten 10) Parting Gifts (14 Sep 2003): six 11) Somnambulist (15 Sep 2003): nine 12) Expecting (28 Sep 2003): nine 13) She (02 Oct 2003): nine 14) I`ve Got You Under My Skin (12 Oct 2003): nine 15) The Prodigal (17 Oct 2003): eight 16) The Ring (17 Oct 2003): seven 17) Eternity (19 Oct 2003): seven 18) Five By Five (22 Oct 2003): six 19) Sanctuary (23 Oct 20030: ten 20) War Zone (25 Oct 2003): eight 21) Blind Date (25 Oct 2003): eight 22) To Shanshu in LA (25 Oct 2003): ten
  • Angel had its links to Buffy, there were crossovers and tie ins, and the similarities at the start of the show were noticeable. But as the seasons progressed and the characters became darker and the plots heavier, it seemed what we were watching was not entirely the same. As times have progressed, it seems audiences desire a darker more gritty version of TV, with shows that don't shy away from the harsher aspects of life, the Wire to name one, are shows favoured for. Angel had its comedic episodes, but the over arching themes were of the dark fight against darkness, being forced into positions where the right path isn't always visible and the seeking of salvation. This show was brilliant, and though it has carried on in comics, it will be sorely missed.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    From start to finish 'Angel' was an amazing show. The character crossovers from 'Buffy The Vampire Slayer' were decent. Its a pity that Glenn Quinn could not live to see this date. Angel's series finale was a spectacle. It as not short the comedy that was present in the show. Spike, Gunn and Angel each provided classic memories. Angel's allusion to the Bible, "One of you will betray me" and followed by Spike raising his hand volunteering to do so. James Marsters last time as Spike performing at a poetry slam will be unforgettable. The series' last episode brought back memories from every season. Doyle, Cordelia, Conner, even references back episodes 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer.' All in all, David Boreanaz has taken fans on a roller coaster ride these past five years. Its always tough to watch a show end. Memories of sitting back and watching it in "the good old days" will flood ones mind and make them wish they could relive those days. But when i comes down to it, to make something meaningful, make sure that it is strong until the very end. 'Angel' did that. It was good.
  • Angelus is a vampire cursed with a human soul. He decides to leave Sunnydale and Buffy Summers after the finale of the 3rd season of 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer'. He moves to Los Angeles where he battles the big bad and protect the helpless. He meets helpful Allen Doyle (Glenn Quinn) who is part demon. On the first case, he runs into Sunnydale alumni Cordelia Chase (Charisma Carpenter) who is trying and failing to break into show business. Another Sunnydale veteran Wesley Wyndam-Pryce (Alexis Denisof) joins him as well as new people Charles Gunn (J. August Richards), Lorne (Andy Hallett) and Fred (Amy Acker).

    This is a darker, more serious, and more grim spin off of Buffy. The show got off to a rocky start with the loss of Glenn Quinn. He obviously had serious problems and the show stumbled trying to reorganize the group chemistry. They slowly recover as the group adds one character after another. Sure it's darker but it also has its fun comedy. It's a great group of characters.
  • Are you one of those who loved Buffy but is not sure to watch this spin off with Angel? Well, let me put you on ease. It's worth to watch. It's got a different tone then Buffy. It's darker, more serious and again much darker. The first season is like with Bufyy a slow starter. But with the second season it started to find its way. It can, like with Buffy feel a little b but admit it, thats why why we love it. Mostly it can feel that because of the low budget and that the casting is not always god. But the scripts is often fantastic, especially the ones written by Joss Whedon. So stick with it and you will see some great episode in season three, four and five.

    The characters evolves through the series and eventually you will find some favorites. Mine has always been Wesley and Lorne. So yeah, if you love Buffy this show is worth too watch. Watch it with Buffy from season four and you will get a universe unlike any other show has been able to top.
  • Emerging in 1999 as a spin-off from popular fantasy show "Buffy The Vampire Slayer", "Angel" quickly carved a noirish niche of its own. It concerns Buffy's vampire lover Angel, who comes to LA to seek redemption for his past sins by helping others and fighting evil.

    While it's progenitor mainly deals, in its own way, with the different stages of adult life, "Angel" uses its seedy LA backdrop as a setting to explore the ambivalent, interdependent relationship between good and evil. The show's uncompromisingly bleak tone rendered it repetitive and turgid viewing at times, but the depth of its story lines and characters always kept it watchable.

    In this, it developed a fine set of protagonists. Angel, the eponymous vampire with a soul, was played with depth and consistency by David Boreanaz. He had some fine support in Charisma Carpenter's Cordelia, who developed from her superficial beginnings into a strong, caring and responsible character. Alexis Denisof did wonders with the role of Wesley, transforming him from a comic fop into a streetwise and commanding on screen presence. Every ensemble needs some comedy, and this was provided in Andy Hallett's Lorne, a camp and wisecracking horned demon with a wonderful singing voice. Amy Acker was cute and lovable and science boffin Fred, and later struck a somber note as former demon goddess Illyria.

    However, J. August Richards has never really lived up to his potential as Charles Gunn, and became something of a token black man. His best season was probably the last one, where Wolfram and Hart endowed Gunn with a comprehensive knowledge of the law. Richards played this arc brilliantly, as Gunn discovered his newfound gift came at a terrible price. Vincent Kartheiser also floundered as Angel's son, not giving his character significant sympathy or depth. It's a pity Glenn Quinn never returned to the show, as he added a wry, quirky quality to the early episodes was never really recaptured.

    Against the ensemble of heroes were pitted an intriguing array of antagonists. The villains here are far more ambiguous than on "Buffy", consisting of initially decent individuals who have become horribly twisted by fate or forced circumstances. They include the tortured Holtz (brilliantly played by Keith Szarabajka), a vampire hunter whose family were murdered by Angel. In Season Four there was Jasmine (Gina Torres), whose attempt to bring about world peace at the cost of free will for the human race further blurred the line between good and evil. Angel's sire and former paramour Darla (Julie Benz), was mysteriously resurrected in Season Two and her presence drove Angel insane. And, of course, Angel's on-running adversaries (and eventual allies), the lawyers at Wolfram and Hart. The conflicted employees of the law firm, whose job is to maintain the balance of good and evil in the universe, made for some great viewing.

    Angel's alliance with the corporate lawyers in Season Five opened up a whole new side to the show, as it examined the mechanics of corporate big business along with inner workings and motivations of power. Repeatedly, Angel found himself caught between doing what was right and what was cost-effective. Fighting and stopping evil gave way to bureaucracy, diplomacy and negotiation.

    This may have cut too close to home with TV executives at Fox, who ordered the show's cancellation in the middle of Season Five. This was a pity, as I would have loved the themes of power and corruption, briefly explored towards the end of the series, given a more thorough exploration in at least a further two seasons. Nevertheless, "Angel" remained funny, intriguing and thoroughly watchable right up to its climatic end.

    Here is a brief selection of the best "Angel" episodes:

    "City of..": Fantastic beginning to the show, setting the theme and the characters with precision and clarity.

    "Hero": Despite the Nazi-like villains, this is a good story and gives Doyle a touching death sequence.

    "Reunion": A newly vampirised Darla goes on the rampage with Drusilla (Juliet Landau). The scene where Angel locks them in a roomful of helpless lawyers is very powerful.

    "Sleep Tight": A conflicted Wesley steals Angel's baby son - with traumatic consequences.

    "Benediction": Holtz and Angel reconcile, before Holtz commits suicide in a final act of revenge.

    "Peace Out": Angel foils Jasmine's scheme, but creates more problems than he solves. The bridge scene between Jasmine and Angel is a must.

    "Home": At the request of the firm's Senior Partners, Angel and his friends take over Wolfram and Hart. Excellent episode that sets the scene for Season Five.

    "Conviction": The Season Five opener setting the new moral dilemmas Angel must face taking over Wolfram and Hart.

    "You're Welcome!": Cordelia's brief return mid-season highlights how far Angel has come since his early days - and how far he has fallen.

    "Smile Time": Hilarious and sexy episode that sees Angel turned into a puppet while trying to gain the affections of werewolf art student Nina (Jenny Mollen).

    "Not Fade Away": There's a vague hint of "Blake's 7" in the cliffhanger, blood-bath finale but at least the vampire hero goes down fighting.
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