Dancer in the Dark (2000)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Musical


Dancer in the Dark (2000) Poster

An east European girl goes to America with her young son, expecting it to be like a Hollywood film.


8/10
94,797

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  • Björk in Dancer in the Dark (2000)
  • Björk at an event for Dancer in the Dark (2000)
  • Björk at an event for Dancer in the Dark (2000)
  • Björk at an event for Dancer in the Dark (2000)
  • Björk in Dancer in the Dark (2000)
  • Björk in Dancer in the Dark (2000)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


10 November 2000 | Pseudo-geordie boy
A film so perfect it hurts to watch.
This is quite possibly the most moving film I've seen, it ensnares you within the first minute, or Bjork does with her interpretation of the sound of music, which is both hilarious and introduces one of the main themes: the magic of musicals. Not one of my favourite genres (but everyone loves The Sound Of Music, right?) but Lars Von Trier makes you re-evaluate your perception with a gentle loving pastiche of the way for no reason people and things in musicals spontaneously erupt into song, made more credible in this film by implicating a reason for it: Bjork's character is going blind so she hears music in the slightest thing and she, in her mind, sees how moves should be choreographed with the music she hears, reminiscent of her own ‘It's Oh So Quiet' music video. And the best thing about this film is the way Bjork charms you with her portrayal of the nicest person in the world, she will do anything for you if she could. She is essentially an innocent and though this is her weakness you can't help but love her all the more: a sparkling performance from a unique singer in real life.

However from this don't assume that this is a light happy film as there is a dark tragic side also, and this side is full of injustice, agony- and I mean agony-, sorrow- like you'd not believe-, and an intense emotional pull as I've ever felt in a cinema before, and it's this half that propels it from being just a great film to becoming one of the greatest. Its greatness is in telling a simple story of a woman trying to stop her own genetic sight disorder afflicting her son, by working every hour to afford the operation, working heavy machinery despite essentially being virtually blind, its greatness is its ability to inflict upon you the gift of feeling every conceivable emotion you posses and you do, you really do experience so much during this film. But I'll not say too much as my enjoyment of this film increased due to, for a change, not second guessing what would happen but to just let it be, I would say to passively watch but there's nothing passive about this film. It really moves you. It makes you feel alive.

This film should be seen alone, in the quiet when you are all by yourself, but more importantly than that it should be seen: this is more than mere movie this is art this is real this is the greatest film I have ever seen: even better than Casablanca, and Shadowlands, and The Piano.

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Details

Release Date:

6 October 2000

Language

English, German, Czech


Country of Origin

Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Italy, USA, UK, France, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Argentina, Norway, Taiwan, Belgium

Filming Locations

Arlington, Washington, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$12,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$91,612 24 September 2000

Gross USA:

$4,184,036

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$40,031,879

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