The Legend of Zelda (1986)

Video Game   |  Action, Adventure, Family


The Legend of Zelda (1986) Poster

Follows the story of a young boy named Link that must save a kidnapped princess from the evil, demonic Ganon, who put a spell on his lair which can only be removed with the 3 pieces of the Triforce, a golden triangle with mystical powers.


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22 May 2006 | Quinoa1984
10
| a childhood favorite still holds a strong fan-base and admiration for the original 20 year later
Just thought I'd put in a few cents on this video game masterpiece, as I rarely pipe in about video games (I rarely play them anymore). Somehow, likely as much for nostalgia as for pure enjoyment, The Legend of Zelda for the original Nintendo Entertainment System (and now available on the Game Boy Advance XP in the 'classics' edition un-changed), is one of the all-time great RPG's ever. It's relatively simple, and for some it's probably winnable and over-and-done with in a night's playing. But there's something addictive too about playing such with such simplicity and (by today's standards) primitive kind of software. The whole task of the game is to get more coins, get more hearts, defeat dragons and dancing fires and ghosts and red/blue knights and so on, in order for Link to save the title character. Whether or not this is the very first Zelda game I'd leave to research, but it is the first that really broke through and has a lasting impact as also being the very first that one could save their game on NES. In other words, if you get tired, save and come back to it, and keep on playing to get all the triangles and top level 9. As someone who has a definite bias from having played the game for nearly my entire life (ever since Nintendo first came into my life and now on Game Boy), it goes without saying that I recommend it to those who may have forgotten it in the smoke of the several new Nintendo systems and even the new (possibly better) Zelda games. But even to the younger ones who already have Playstation 3.14, it's worth a try to get a glimpse of the really nifty days when all you had was a sword, 2-D, and some very typical- in a good way- music for the show. It's a treasure of its time.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Shigeru Miyamoto got the idea for the game from his childhood memories. As a young boy, he would often explore the countryside around his house in Kyoto, and one day he found a cave, which he entered after getting a lantern from his home and mustering all his courage. This was the kind of experience he wanted to recreate for the game. The labyrinth dungeons were based on Miyamoto's family house which had many rooms and sliding doors, and was therefore easy to get lost in.


Quotes

Old Woman: BOY, YOU'RE RICH.


Goofs

In one of the dungeons, you will receive a hint that the enemy Pols Voice dislikes noise - yet blowing the whistle does nothing to hurt the enemy. The Famicom (the original Japanese version of the NES) had a microphone, and the player could make noise in it to kill these enemies. As the American NES aborted this feature, this was not possible. Nintendo went ahead and translated this hint verbatim, but because of the lack of a microphone in the American NES, it no longer made any sense and was often misinterpreted.


Crazy Credits

During the end credits, the entire crew except for executive producer Hiroshi Yamauchi is listed under pseudonyms. E.g. producer/director Shigeru Miyamoto is credited as "S. Miyahon", and composer Koji Kondo as "Konchan". See also Trivia.


Alternate Versions

Re-released in 2003 as part of a Zelda Collector's Disk which also included The Adventure of Link, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo for The Wind Waker. Although the gameplay and graphics remained the same, a lot of the infamously translated text was cleaned up, namely the story introduction and some character dialog.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Action | Adventure | Family | Fantasy | Mystery

Details

Release Date:

22 August 1987

Language

English, Japanese


Country of Origin

Japan

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