Bicentennial Man (1999)

PG   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Sci-Fi


Bicentennial Man (1999) Poster

An android endeavors to become human as he gradually acquires emotions.


6.9/10
109,362


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  • Bicentennial Man (1999)
  • Robin Williams and Hallie Eisenberg in Bicentennial Man (1999)
  • Bicentennial Man (1999)
  • Allan Rich and Robin Williams in "Bicentennial Man"
  • Bicentennial Man (1999)
  • Bicentennial Man (1999)

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User Reviews


2 January 2000 | ruby_fff
7
| A fable, beyond the myth of HAL 2000 -- a film for mature consumption and appreciation
Isaac Asimov, scientist, anthropologist, and philosopher all in one, thought of this Robotic subject beyond the mere joy of fantastic possibilities of computer technology -- it's a more encompassing inquiry to what if a Robot thinks, feels, loves, and yes, wants to be accepted as a human, the imperfections and all!

This Chris Columbus directed movie, with the ever-eloquent Robin Williams, and radiant double deliveries (two character portrayals) by Embeth Davidtz, is not the usual Robin Williams comedy fare. It's not "Flubber" or "Mrs. Doubtfire"; it's a philosophical fable at best. It's the reverse of John Boorman's "Zardoz" (1973), where man wanting to be eternally youthful -- here, Robot Andrew (Robin Williams) does not want to be immortal. He wants to experience and feel life, and with a beloved human companion.

This Robotic journey spanning decades, gives us life lessons, prompts us to think reflectively on questions of life and living, growing old and resignation to death. The point filtered through Portia (Embeth Davidtz) that being human is to risk and make mistakes/wrong decisions, hearkens to a quote by John Cage: "Computers are always right, but life isn't about being right."

Film score is by James Horner ("Legends of the Fall", "Braveheart", "Titanic"). Location shots include San Francisco landmarks with added air transport images (likened to "The Fifth Element") in a futuristic sky. There are no explosive actions or flying bullets, it's an immortal tale about the acceptance of being a mortal human.

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Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Drama | Sci-Fi

Details

Release Date:

17 December 1999

Language

English


Country of Origin

USA, Germany

Filming Locations

Alameda, California, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$100,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$8,234,926 19 December 1999

Gross USA:

$58,223,861

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$87,423,861

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