A Knight's Tale (2001)

PG-13   |    |  Action, Adventure, Romance


A Knight's Tale (2001) Poster

After his master dies, a peasant squire, fueled by his desire for food and glory, creates a new identity for himself as a knight.


6.9/10
173,649


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  • Apollonia Kotero at an event for A Knight's Tale (2001)
  • Heath Ledger in A Knight's Tale (2001)
  • Paul Bettany and Alan Tudyk in A Knight's Tale (2001)
  • Alan Tudyk at an event for A Knight's Tale (2001)
  • Writer/director/producer Brian Helgeland (left) and star Heath Ledger discuss a scene during the Prague-based filming
  • Shannyn Sossamon in A Knight's Tale (2001)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


3 February 2005 | Danny_kahn
9
| Entertaining
This comment is to counter those who have issue with modern rock and other time problems being in this movie. This movie was designed to entertain. It was NOT a historical piece and nowhere does it claim to be one. This is the story of a boy who aspires to be more than what society set out for him. The movie uses odd references to history's great figures and humor to bring its story across to the viewer. So I say that, for those of you who cannot enjoy a piece of entertainment due to its well placed use of anachronisms, I strongly suggest you stay away from any of Shakespeare's works. (Not to say that this movie was on level with Shakespeare...) The makers of "A Knight's Tale" set out to entertain, and did so dutifully.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film is intentionally anachronistic and not meant to be historically accurate. Although the real-life Edward, Prince of Wales is often referred to as the "Black Prince," there is no record of this name being used during his lifetime, nor for more than 150 years after his death. He was instead known as Edward of Woodstock (after his place of birth), or by one of his titles. The name seems to have been created to distinguish him from numerous other Princes of Wales named Edward throughout history. The usual explanation is that the name derives from his black helmet, although it has also been suggested that he was "black-hearted," i.e. merciless on the battlefield.


Quotes

William: Should we help him?


Goofs

In the final joust, the camera comes in for a close up on William, where you can see the bobby pins above his ear holding his hair back.


Crazy Credits

As the first credits appear, the camera swings to show a constellation behind William and Jocelyn. The constellation is Orion, the Hunter, Jocelyn's nickname for William.


Alternate Versions

The DVD includes six extended/deleted scenes:

  • A scene of Will, Roland and Wat around a campfire during the training, where Will comes up with the idea for sir Ulrich's crest: a phoenix. Wat and Roland say there should be three phoenixes, since there's three of them.
  • Lord Adhemar's original introduction scene, where he slaps around one of his servants while having his armor fitted, and reference is made to the "triple phoenix" design of Sir Ulrich's crest.
  • Chaucer giving another substantial introduction for Sir Ulrich, similar to the first one, right before his match with Lord Adhemar. He berates Adhemar's herald before the speech; after the speech, Adhemar's herald appears impressed, which leads to his imitation of Chaucer's style later in the film.
  • When Adhemar leaves the dance, we find out the reason for his pained expression; in a deleted scene, he reveals to a monk that he is tone-deaf, and has never been able to hear music as anything more than noise. Adhemar then strides out into the midst of the poor, waiting outside the castle for handouts, and starts a riot by throwing food and money into the crowd.
  • Another deleted scene has Will, Roland, Wat, and Kate seeing Chaucer walking back to their quarters naked again. They follow him, but it turns that he was fetching food for his wife, Phillipa (who is also naked), and had not lost his clothes gambling like they thought. They leave, laughing, and run into Jocelyn and Christiana. Christiana and Roland leave together (with a suggestion of romance), William and Jocelyn leave together, but when Wat holds out his hand for Kate, she just hands him a pastry and walks off. Wat says "Hey, Beautiful" to the pastry and walks off happy anyway.
  • The original version of the scene with William in the stocks is considerably longer, and has an extensive speech by Chaucer (which is probably his best in the film). Rather than having the crowd calmed by the appearance of Prince Edward, the crowd is converted by Chaucer's speech, and has already begun chanting "William, William!" by the time the Prince reveals himself. A much stronger version of the scene, but cut down in favor of having the Prince's role expanded.


Soundtracks

Further On Up the Road
Written by
Don D. Robey (as Don Robey) and Joe Veasey
Performed by Eric Clapton
Courtesy of Universal International Music, B.V.
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Adventure | Romance

Details

Release Date:

11 May 2001

Language

English, French, Latin


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Barrandov Studios, Prague, Czech Republic

Box Office

Budget:

$65,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,511,391 13 May 2001

Gross USA:

$56,569,702

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$117,487,473

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