The West Wing (1999–2006)

TV Series   |  TV-14   |    |  Drama


Episode Guide
The West Wing (1999) Poster

Inside the lives of staffers in the West Wing of the White House.

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8.7/10
55,542

Photos

  • Jimmy Smits and Ed O'Neill in The West Wing (1999)
  • Bradley Whitford at an event for The West Wing (1999)
  • Milo O'Shea at an event for The West Wing (1999)
  • The West Wing (1999)
  • The West Wing (1999)
  • Ed O'Neill in The West Wing (1999)

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Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creator:

Aaron Sorkin

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


6 December 2004 | wamweri
Making real drama out of politics
So much political reporting seems to be an attempt to fake a drama out of little material. I missed the West Wing when it started, but am catching up now, and find that it turns the specifics of politics into gripping human drama with a fast pace.

The camera seems to move as quickly as the people, following one conversation, then picking up another as two corridors intersect, and going off after that conversation instead. It's a remarkably effective dramatic device, that helps generate a sense of many topics, issues and personalities all being constantly on the move in response to events.

The acting is uniformly good, and often not on screen, Martin Sheen's president remains a constant presence shaping every story.

Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

For the first season, Stockard Channing and Allison Janney received Emmy nominations for Supporting Actress. Janney, who eventually won, did the whole season as a regular cast member. Channing did three episodes as a Special Guest Star. A similar thing happened for the third season, when Channing, Janel Moloney and Mary-Louise Parker were nominated for Supporting Actress. Channing won, having done ten episodes, but was now part of the opening sequence. Moloney did the whole season as a regular cast member, and Parker only did seven episodes as a Guest Star. For the sixth season, Alan Alda was nominated for Supporting Actor having done six episodes as a Special Guest Star. He won the following year, but for the last season, he was a regular on the show.


Quotes

Donna Moss: She should stick around. Your whole campaign is like some Dr. Seuss nightmare - One Fish, Two Fish, Dead Fish, We Fought The Good Fight Fish.


Goofs

President Bartlet's code name, in one of the first episodes, is "Eagle." As he passes the Secret Service the agent says "Eagle has passed." In a episode later that season when Bartlet has collapsed, an agent says "Liberty is down."


Crazy Credits

Episode titles are usually the first thing shown on screen (after recaps). This is one of the only American series to show episode titles before its opening credits.


Alternate Versions

The original broadcast and syndicated versions of the entire second season were in a 1.33:1 full-screen format, except on select HD broadcasters. The DVD versions of the second season episodes are in the filmed wide-screen format of 1.78:1


Soundtracks

Cello Suite No. 1 Prelude
(uncredited)
Written by
Johann Sebastian Bach

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama

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