A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)

PG-13   |    |  Drama, Sci-Fi


A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) Poster

A highly advanced robotic boy longs to become "real" so that he can regain the love of his human mother.


7.2/10
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  • Jude Law and Haley Joel Osment in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Haley Joel Osment in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Jude Law and Haley Joel Osment in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Haley Joel Osment and Frances O'Connor in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Jude Law and Haley Joel Osment in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Haley Joel Osment in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)

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User Reviews


17 April 2002 | csm23
Artificial, but not Intelligent
Steven Spielberg's AI fails to live up to its billing, which really bothers me, because artificial intelligence is such a rich and variegated subject, traversing the fields of biophysics, psychology, philosophy, and even religion, that the payoffs for careful consideration of this subject are potentially great, perhaps even inspiring. Spielberg, it seems, didn't even bother to make a trip to the library, preferring instead to invest awkward and incomprehensible phrases like `human beings are the key to the meaning of existence' with eschatological gravitas.

Throughout this film, Spielberg drives home one theme over and over and over: humans are more programmatic, both in their thinking, and their behavior, than `mechas.' We watch David's parents first adopt and then abandon the robot boy because of their prejudice about what is `real' and what is not, a deliberate irony seeing as how David is in many ways more human than their biological son. We see a perfectly ridiculous `Flesh Fair' thrown into the movie to embellish this point: the `artificiality' these humans seek to destroy might just as well be their own.

At worst, the movie has a psychotic message. At the heart of the film, Professor Hobby, who designed David, delivers an impassioned speech, telling him that his singular quest to become a `real' boy at the magical hand of the Blue Fairy is a human flaw which is also humanity's `greatest single' gift: The ability to `chase down dreams. ` Problem is, if a human dreamed of becoming a non-organic being, and could not find surcease from his labors to do so, he would become, if not already, psychotic. Why Mr. `Hobby' couldn't have made the boy to accept himself as he is, which is the essence of human spirituality, seems never to have occurred to him. And so one leaves the movie with a sick feeling in the pit of one's stomach, due largely to the fact that this psychotic idea is presented as an axiom, with religious fervor.

AI succeeds in being artificial, but not in showing intelligence.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

After seeing Chris Cunningham's work on Judge Dredd (1995), Stanley Kubrick head-hunted Chris Cunningham to design and supervise animatronic tests of the central robot child character in his version of this movie. Cunningham worked for over a year on this movie, before leaving to pursue a career as a director.


Quotes

Narrator: Those were the years after the ice caps had melted... because of the greenhouse gases, and the oceans had risen drown so many cities... along all the shorelines of the world. Amsterdam, Venice, New York - Forever lost. Millions of people were ...


Goofs

In the Flesh Fair, when the "nanny" robot is dissolved under the shower of acid, the acid was transported in and dumped from tin buckets. Any acid that acted that quickly on the mecha would have eaten through a metal bucket just as quickly, thus the worker who carried the bucket would never had had time to carry it to and make it up that ladder.


Crazy Credits

In theatrical previews, on one of the final credit frames, the Hebrew word "Chochmoh", meaning wisdom or knowledge, is written in small red letters.


Alternate Versions

For the U.S. theatrical release, the Warner Bros. logo appeared before the Dreamworks logo at the beginning of the film, and the poster credits said, "Warner Bros. and Dreamworks Pictures present." Since the U.S. version's home video/DVD rights are owned by Dreamworks, the Dreamworks logo at the beginning of the movie appears before the Warner Bros. logo, and the back of the box's cover art says, "Dreamworks Pictures and Warner Bros. present."


Soundtracks

What About Us
Written by
Al Jourgensen, Paul Barker, Max Brody and Ty Coon (as Deborah Coon)
Produced by Al Jourgensen and Paul Barker with Robert Ezrin (as Bob Ezrin)
Performed by Ministry

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Drama | Sci-Fi

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