Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (2000)

G   |    |  Animation, Adventure, Comedy


Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (2000) Poster

The Rugrats travel to Paris, France, where Chuckie hopes to find a new mother and keep his father from marrying an evil business woman.


6.1/10
10,249

Photos

  • Directors Paul DeMeyer & Stig Bergqvist
  • Susan Sarandon provides the voice of Coco
  • Amanda Bynes at an event for Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (2000)
  • Producers Arlene Klasky and Gabor Csupo
  • The Rugrats gang and Coco
  • Quad Movie Poster, 40" x 30"

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13 December 2000 | TuckMN
8
| The Rugrats visit Paris -- and Paris will never be the same.
With lots of fun references to other movies (`Godfather' being the best homage) `Rugrats in Paris' is a good time for all.

The animation in this film is not as flashy as in the first `Rugrats' movie that came out in 1998 but because of that it works all that much better. It is more simplistic, less dark and much more in the vein of the Nickelodeon cartoon series.

It also has a few breakthrough moments: why Chuckie doesn't have a Mom, Chuckie's first word (at least the first word understandable by adults) and actual empathy by Angelica for another person's feelings.

That is why I continue to watch the `Rugrats' both on television and in their movies: unlike so many other cartoon characters they continue to evolve and grow – though I hope they never truly grow up.

In addition to the usual voices used in the Nickelodeon series the addition of Debbie Reynolds, Susan Sarandon, John Lithgow and Casey Kasem make this film version just that much better. Especially Susan Sarandon who plays the scheming ‘Coco LaBouche' – a real star turn if ever there was one.

There are a few scary moments that children of the actual age that the Tommy, Chuckie, Phil and Lil are supposed to be might find to be a little too much but the overall film has a lot of warm, fuzzy moments that, as is the standard for all the ‘Rugrats' productions, teach a good lesson without hitting you over the head with it.

There is pathos, sweetness, redemption, scariness and just the right amount of humour to make this a film that all the family should see.

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