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  • The whole cast admirably put across what i imagine was a difficult time in U.S. history, i.e. the 'race' issue in the 50's. The friendship between Sonny and Luke was central to the story in that they only saw friendship and not "colour". Being a Dean Cain fan i was anxious to see how he would play the sheriff but i was not disappointed as he showed the sheriff to be a fair in his dealings with everyone in the town. It showed Dean's love of history in that he really believed in this role. He came across as a person who does not see "colour" himself.

    Yes a very enjoyable film.
  • Duane McLaughlin, the kid who played Sonny Monroe did a really good job! I believe that he truly captured the essence of an African American boy who had to deal with many problems at such a young age. Dean Cain, better known as "Superman" from the Lois and Clark Adventures also did a good job.

    Best of Luck- Charles

    PS.

    As a young actor myself, I could truly appreciate his work.
  • With all the potent ingredients in this story, including racial conflict in the South just after WWII, this film was sadly bland, tepid, cautious, weak, likely fearful of offending anyone. I assume it was limited by the production company, as a more daring script might not have found a home on the network that ran it. But seriously, given the setting, not a single white person, even the obviously drunk and/or bigoted ones, ever uses the n-word? I dislike that word myself, but pretending that people in that time and place never used it rather hurts the credibility of a period piece. The actors did the best they could with their material, especially Ms Erbe. I'd love to see a more realistic version by either a bolder network or for theatrical release. Alas.