Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)

R   |    |  Action, Adventure, Drama


Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001) Poster

In 18th century France, the Chevalier de Fronsac and his native American friend Mani are sent by the King to the Gevaudan province to investigate the killings of hundreds by a mysterious beast.

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7.1/10
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  • Christophe Gans in Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)
  • Christophe Gans at an event for Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)
  • Monica Bellucci at an event for Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)
  • Monica Bellucci and Samuel Le Bihan in Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)
  • Mark Dacascos at an event for Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)
  • Mark Dacascos at an event for Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001)

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Reviews & Commentary

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4 February 2002 | TheVid
An extravagant B-movie from France with all the right matinee-adventure ingredients.
This is a grandiose monster movie from France that delivers the perfect blend of slick style and unsophisticated, gothic melodrama to make it one of the most appealing film fantasies in a long while. The international success of the film is not hard to understand; it's exhilarating in the same way that the old Hammer horror films were in their heyday. Everything about this elaborate movie is terrifically tacky, particularly the stunning production design. It's like seeing those artless, wilderness paintings containing hidden animal images come to life. The characters come off as if they were lifted right off of some garish paperback romance-novel cover. Best of all, the film has some nifty flourishes of sex and violence sadly missing from the current spate of half-baked, PG-13 Hollywood product. While some seem to be complaining of one martial-arts fight too many, faulty creature effects or simple-minded plotting; in this case, it's like bitching about KING KONG being over the top. This is a contemporary B-movie (albeit an expensive, subtitled one) for those who appreciate a good time at the movies. It delivers the kind of satisfaction audiences used to get seeing the work of Mario Bava or Ray Harryhausen; and that's saying a lot!

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Apparently in the belief that no one outside France has any sense of history, the translators writing subtitles omitted a historical reference in old d'Apcher's memoir. The subtitles read, "The Revolution has swept the land," but in French he says, "The Revolution has become the Terror" (this may have been changed in some DVD versions).


Quotes

Jean-Francois de Morangias: So tell me sir, do they speak of the beast in Paris?
Gregoire De Fronsac: Speak of it? They're already singing songs about it.
Geneviève de Morangias: Instead of singing songs, they should be saying prayers.


Goofs

In the "final" fighting scene by the ruins, the wire that makes one of the women "fly" is visible when she lands in the leaves.


Alternate Versions

The Canadian 3-disc DVD (released in October 2002) and the United States 2-disc Special Edition DVD (released in August 2008) features a 151 minute director's cut with the following scenes added to the middle of the film before and after Fronsac returns to Paris:

  • Right after Fronsac has constructed the fake beast for De Bauternes, he goes to the brothel, gets drunk and confesses to Sylvia that the beast caught by De Bauternes is a fake.
  • An long steadicam shot from Jean-Francois' POV as he sneaks through the brothel and into Sylvia's room, where he finds a sketch of Sylvia naked that Fronsac has drawn. He laughs because it's just what he needs to drive Marianne away from Fronsac.
  • Fronsac arrives at the De Morangias' castle to see Marianne one last time before returning to Paris. The guards tell him he is no longer welcome on orders of the Countess and that Marianne is sick. Jean-Francois turns up and tells the guards and his mother to let Fronsac in. Jean-Francois leads him into the great hall where Marianne waits. She tells Fronsac she doesn't want to see him again and tosses the naked sketch of Sylvie onto the floor. Fronsac storms out, knocking Jean-Francois to the floor on his way.
  • After the second girl is killed down in the pit there is a scene inside the Church where Sylvia kneels down next to Marianne as she prays. She tells Marianne the Fronsac truly only loves her. Sardis watches Sylvia suspiciously as she leaves.
  • A scene on the docks as Fronsac and Mani are loading supplies for the trip to Africa. Thomas D'Apacher turns up and tells Fronsac that the beast continued attacking after he and De Beauternes left. D'Apacher cannot find anyone to go on the hunt with him and he wants to try to hunt this time using Mani's methods. At first Fronsac refuses, but D'Apacher provides him with a love letter from Marianne in which she asks for the secret meeting at her nanny's house. Fronsac agrees to return.


Soundtracks

Once
(uncredited)
by
Felicia Sorensen

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Adventure | Drama | Horror | Thriller

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