Donnie Darko (2001)

R   |    |  Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi


Donnie Darko (2001) Poster

A troubled teenager is plagued by visions of a man in a large rabbit suit who manipulates him to commit a series of crimes, after he narrowly escapes a bizarre accident.


8/10
714,268

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  • Jake Gyllenhaal and Maggie Gyllenhaal at an event for Donnie Darko (2001)
  • Richard Kelly and Steven Poster in Donnie Darko (2001)
  • Donnie Darko (2001)
  • Daveigh Chase at an event for Donnie Darko (2001)
  • Jake Gyllenhaal and Maggie Gyllenhaal at an event for Donnie Darko (2001)
  • Daveigh Chase at an event for Donnie Darko (2001)

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23 May 2002 | lwjoslin
the dreams in which I'm dying are the best I've ever had
"Harvey" meets "The Mothman Prophecies," as a troubled teen starts hallucinating a horrific 6-foot-tall bunny rabbit that brings him dark forebodings about death and disaster in the very near future. A streak of "Heathers" is mixed in as well, with trenchant satirical observations of high-school life in the late '80s (story set in Oct. 1988), involving a priggish teacher, a self-help guru (Patrick Swayze!), and a put-upon fat girl at the fringes of the herd. Finally, a whiff of "Back to the Future," in the form of a local eccentric who just may have discovered the secret of time travel, but a secret that has more to do with spirituality than technology.

A lot goes on here. There's a meditation on the possible overlap between madness and the ability to perceive the divine. There's a demonstration of why, in the Bible, angelic messengers (if that's what "Frank" can be taken to be) are often so terrifying that they have to start by saying "Fear not." There's an enlistment of what martial artists refer to as the "ki" (or personal energy, emanating from a person's midsection) in the type of time travel depicted here (the term "ki" is never used in the flick, but the term "path," another word for Tao or "Way," is). Quantum physics theory about wormholes is tied to the Fortean phenomenon of things falling unexplained from the sky, in a way that's more pivotal, and therefore more interesting, than the gratuitous rain of frogs in "Magnolia."

Time travel paradoxes and ironies enter the picture as well. One character (no spoiler!), whose life is saved by Donnie's ultimate trip back in time, wouldn't have died in the first place if he hadn't dragged her along to the opening of the wormhole. Another character (again, no spoiler!), whose truly terrible secret comes to light in the wake of an arson investigation, must go unexposed as a result of that same time reversal, since the arson now won't happen. Surely that's no oversight on the part of the screenwriter; it must be an acknowledgment of the choices and trade-offs in life, as well as of a confidence that no such terrible secret can remain hidden forever.

Somehow this pastiche works, largely on the strength of good performances. Jake Gyllenhaal is appropriately moody and, also appropriately, not always likeable in the title role. Drew Barrymore, who executive produced, appears as a frustrated first-year teacher. The movie's often dreamlike atmosphere is enhanced by the cinematography, the subdued but effective special effects, and the choice of the music on the soundtrack, which includes '80's pop tunes, of course, and a haunting original song (over the end credits) titled "Mad World."

Not for all tastes, but better, stranger, and more complex than I expected.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene where the entire school is flooded, you can see a shot of a message underneath the mascot's statue. It says, "They made me do it." Later in the scene of the Halloween party, just before the end, you can see a shot of a message on the fridge which says: "Frank was here, went to get beer." The two texts are in the same hand writing which is a hint at the fact that the Frank who went out to get beer, is the same Frank as Donnie's imaginary bunny.


Quotes

Elizabeth: I'm voting for Dukakis.


Goofs

When Donnie's science teacher begins talking about Roberta Sparrow's book, Donnie puts the Slinky around his neck. The camera cuts to Donnie taking the book and cuts directly back to a rear angle of Donnie to show the Slinky still taut around his neck, which it would not be if he had released his grip on one end of it.


Crazy Credits

"Proud to Be Loud" Performed by The Dead Green Mummies -- this song is actually performed by the band Pantera. (The Dead Green Mummies do not exist.) Pantera has all but disowned their first four albums, this song is track 5 on the fourth of those albums, "Power Metal." The band presumably did not want to be credited with the song (as they don't consider any of their pre-1990 material part of their discography) and made up the name The Dead Green Mummies.


Alternate Versions

In the original version, when Donnie first begins to witness the liquid spear coming out of his chest, the spear moves across the room, turns back toward him and forms a large sort-of finger that beckons him to follow. In the Director's cut, the spear does not beckon him. He simply follows. Also the soundtrack in this scene has changed. Previously, we could hear the TV advertising the Middlesex Halloween Carnival. This has been replaced with sound effects now associated with any of the oddities of the tangent universe. In the Director's Cut there is also the audio for a commercial for "Who's the Boss?" starring Tony Danza inserted prior to the Halloween Carnival add.


Soundtracks

Lucid Assembly
Written and Performed by
Gerard Bauer and Michael K. Bauer (as Mike Bauer)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi | Thriller

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