Finding Nemo (2003)

G   |    |  Animation, Adventure, Comedy


Finding Nemo (2003) Poster

After his son is captured in the Great Barrier Reef and taken to Sydney, a timid clownfish sets out on a journey to bring him home.


8.1/10
881,659

Videos


Photos

  • Willem Dafoe and Alexander Gould in Finding Nemo (2003)
  • Finding Nemo (2003)
  • Finding Nemo (2003)
  • Finding Nemo (2003)
  • Ellen DeGeneres and Andrew Stanton in Finding Nemo (2003)
  • Albert Brooks and Alexander Gould in Finding Nemo (2003)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


20 March 2006 | PizzicatoFishCrouch
10
| Swimming with Sharks is a Whale of a Time
Marlin, a nervous and neurotic clownfish is heavily overprotective of his son Nemo, who only wants to explore the sea in its entirety. When Nemo gets caught by a scuba diver and taken away, it is up to Marlin to swallow his own fears and find Nemo. The ensuing search and rescue organized by the him is a mass effort by swimming and flying creatures of all sizes and personalities, such as a threesome of vegetarian sharks, a fish with short term memory and an aged turtle, all helping him realise the error of his ways in restricting himself to just his home.

As charming as it is beautiful, Finding Nemo is a joy, both visually and cinematically. The characters are all so appealing and sweet that you want to hug each and every one of them, Nemo and Dory in particular. But the film transcends above just a generic animated film, for there are lessons to be learnt by it too. The film often tells a children's tale from an adult's point of view, with risky situations and emotional soul-searching putting stress on a disjointed family.

The sea is brought to us in such a memorable and unique way that there is brilliance and beauty in every frame. The animation is of all time high for Pixar, and the sound mixing and editing are also to be credited, as they capture the heart of the sea creditably. But perhaps the best thing about the film is the musical score by Thomas Newman. He creates the essence of the sea, as well as the emotions felt by the fish throughout. Note the masterwork that occurs as an upbeat, jovial number quickly escalates into something darker in a matter of minutes. In short, the music is superb.

The voice cast are capable and cannily chosen, from young Alexander Gould as the naïve Nemo, as well as Albert Brooks as the bumbling Marlin. But the star of the show is Ellen DeGeneres as Dory. As the forgetful but caring fish, she is sweet and soulful, and provides much of the comedy of the film. But the humour is also provided by the great script, which delivers a potentially dull story with wit and soul, and shies away from the sentimentality that could so easily arise of a Disney film. And the jokes, what jokes – from satire, spoof and slapstick, they'll be a one-liner for everybody here.

Gorgeous to look at and utterly adorable, Finding Nemo sets the standard for how animated movies should being terms of entertainment value as well as story and themes – ending with the touching, thought-provoking message of how too much protectiveness on the parent's side will repel, but, no matter how independent a child (or fish) believes themselves to be, they'll always need their parents.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

Monsters, Inc.

Monsters, Inc.

Up

Up

Toy Story

Toy Story

WALL·E

WALL·E

The Incredibles

The Incredibles

Ratatouille

Ratatouille

Toy Story 3

Toy Story 3

Inside Out

Inside Out

Toy Story 2

Toy Story 2

Shrek

Shrek

Ice Age

Ice Age

The Lion King

The Lion King

Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene where the silver fish are playing charades with Dory, one of the shapes is that of an old ship. The fish are whistling "Whale of a Tale", which was sung by Kirk Douglas in the beginning of the 1954 Disney movie, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954). The submarine captain in that movie was named "Nemo".


Quotes

Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Mmm.
Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Mm-hmm.
Marlin: Wow.
Coral: Yes, Marlin. I... No, I see it. It's beautiful.
Marlin: So, Coral, when you said you wanted an ocean view, you didn't think you were going to get the whole ocean, did you? Huh?
Marlin: Oh, yeah. A fish can breathe out here. Did your man ...


Goofs

The whole point of the movie is that young Nemo foolishly leaves the safety of the reef, by venturing out into the open ocean. However, this is exactly what all clownfish hatchlings do, to escape the many *dangers* of the reef; only once they've grown to the size of a button do the juveniles return, guided by the cacophony of a healthy reef's inhabitants.


Crazy Credits

During the end credits, Mike Wazowski (the one-eyed character from Monsters, Inc. (2001)) can be seen swimming across the screen while wearing scuba-diving equipment.


Alternate Versions

In the 3D re-release the old Disney logo is replaced with the new Disney logo and the Pixar logo that was used in the 3D version of Up (2009). These changes were also made in the 3D Blu-ray release (The regular Pixar logo is used in the 2012 DVD & 2D Blu-ray version).


Soundtracks

Gill
Written by
Thomas Newman

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Animation | Adventure | Comedy | Family

Our Favorite Trailers of the Week

Get a quick look at the the week's big trailers, including The Lighthouse, Gretel & Hansel, Doctor Sleep, Jojo Rabbit, and Jexi.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Join us Sunday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT for IMDb LIVE After the Emmys, with exclusive interviews, and more. Plus, see what IMDb editors are watching this month.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com