Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)

R   |    |  Action, Crime, Drama


Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) Poster

After awakening from a four-year coma, a former assassin wreaks vengeance on the team of assassins who betrayed her.


8.1/10
1,012,232

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


9 October 2003 | janyeap
An adrenaline-driven coaster-ride through gratingly bold and captivating martial-arts extravaganza.
Sure it's outlandishly violent and bloody. Can anyone expect Tarantino's movie not to be a true mind-blowing, adrenaline-pumping shocker? Of course not! Gritty and slick, his first installment of KB rocks with moody western imagery, the '60s and '70s-era of Hong Kong martial arts-action, the influences of the ritualistic samurai swordsmanship, and Japanese anime. Like in all his films, Tarantino never fails to merge dark humor with terror. It's impossible not to smile over the Shaw Bros.' iconic introduction ploy and the De Palma-esque split screens. Observe the `Carrie' blank-starry eyed image settled on The Bride's gory face as she's introduced to the audience. Perhaps, Uma Thurman in her yellow suit is a salute to the yellow-suited Bruce Lee in his last film, The Game of Death. Or is The Bride 'Just another little Western girl playing at being a samurai' - as O-Ren Ishii blatantly puts it?

This film's a sampling of the Tarantino 'fury,' short of the Tarantino customary fiery tongue. It celebrates the Tarantino trademark of avoiding the use of computer-generated CGI special effects. It's almost as if I'm watching a colorful and bloodied kabuki stage that's displaying a stunningly massive tournament of multi-layered kung-fu and female samura sword-fighting styles to dazzle the audience. It's examining how Tarantino catalogues the great stylistic elements of his favorite 'old-school' filmmakers and transforms them into a phenomenally creative and mesmerizing film. Yep, there's a great deal of captivatingly artistic boldness in this film. Powerfully portrayed and not to be easily forgotten. Violently brutal and gloriously gory without doubt, and yet so aesthetically operatic and astoundingly artful. The music and lyrics that accompany the scenes are astounding. They set the moods so appropriately with the events.

Even at 'The House Of Blue Leaves', we get to see Tarantino weaving the artistic styles of Lucio Fulci, Chang-Che, Sergio Leone, Kurosawa, Zhang Yimou and Busby Berkeley to bring the audience a stylistic exhibit of remarkable montage grandeur. The themes of betrayal and revenge come off strong. Every camera shot and scene seems to scream out, non-stop, `Kill Bill and all of Bill's DVAS members.' My adrenaline's still flowing as I'm recalling the scenes. Tarantino has make a solid point with this film to show that martial arts scenes should stick to the artful and realistic choreographic treatment to sustain the true spiritual spirit of martial arts. A+

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Did You Know?

Trivia

There has been speculation among fans of the film that the reason behind Hanzo's blood oath to never "make something that kills" again, was a direct result of being deceived by Bill. While under Hanzo's training, Bill convinced him to craft swords for several of the DiVAS (namely himself, Budd, and O-Ren), under the guise of presents or some other innocent excuse, when the swords were in fact to be used as part of the group's arsenal of weapons to assassinate people for hire. When Hanzo discovered Bill's true motivations, he was so disgusted and scandalized by this, Hanzo fled to Okinawa and swore the blood oath, only making the sword for The Bride as a way of evening the scales and atoning for having his creations used by those who would assassinate people for money.


Quotes

Bill: Do you find me sadistic? You know, I bet I could fry an egg on your head right now, if I wanted to. You know, Kiddo, I'd like to believe that you're aware enough even now to know that there's nothing sadistic in my actions. Well, maybe towards those...


Goofs

When the Bride boards the airplane she has the samurai sword with her in the cabin. Obviously, this wouldn't happen in reality. This is a stylistic choice for this film. The couple sitting directly behind The Bride have a sword as well, and a third sword can be seen. In addition, all of O-Ren's outriders have swords prominently displayed on their bikes.


Crazy Credits

The opening title cards read "The fourth film by Quentin Tarantino".


Alternate Versions

Some prints of the film doesn't show the "Shaw Scope" intro.


Soundtracks

Twisted Nerve
Written by
Bernard Herrmann
Performed by Bernard Herrmann
Courtesy of Canal + Image UK, Ltd.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Crime | Drama | Thriller

Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,200,000 12 October 2003

Gross USA:

$70,099,045

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$180,906,076

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