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  • "ZigZag" is a very touching, beautiful story that is covered with heartache, fear and abuse. ZigZag is the main character in this film, he is a young autistic boy with an abusive, junkie father. ZigZag finds peace and a father figure in John Liguzamo's character who is his big brother. The realtionship between the two is a match made in heaven. Singer's shows ZigZag that life isn't all made up of fear, disapointment and abuse. He show's him the bright side of life. The film is very well done with strong performances by everyone in the film. I was very happy with Natasha Lyonne's performance as a prostitute with a soft heart. All in all, a great touching movie! ****/out of 5
  • Zig Zag (Sam Jones III) is a fifteen years old autistic teenager, living with his abusive father Fletcher (Wesley Snipes), who frequently beats him. Fletcher charges him for a rent of US$ 200,00, otherwise he would be thrown out of his home. Although working washing dishes in a restaurant, whose owner Toad (Oliver Platt) humiliates him very often, Zig Zag does not have the money and becomes worried with the situation. Zig Zag sees Toad opening his safe, memorizes the combination and in the night he steals almost ten thousand dollars. When he comes back home, Fletcher takes all the money from him and uses it to repay a loan to the dangerous Cadillac Tom (Luke Goss). Singer (John Leguizamo) is the best friend of Zig Zag and when knows what he did, he decides to return the money to Toad's safe, otherwise Zig Zag would be sent to a reformatory. However, Singer is very sick, having a terminal cancer, and her uses the support of the prostitute Jenna (Natasha Lyonne) to accomplish his intent. This movie is almost good, but something does not work well in the story. The cast has a great performance, but the genre is too corny for a drama, too slow for an adventure and too dramatic for a comedy. My vote is six.

    Title (Brazil): `Conduta Ilegal' (`Illegal Behavior')
  • "Zigzag" tells of a benchmark time in the life of the title character, a mentally "different" black 15 year old innercity boy (Jones). An ambiguous tale with an underdeveloped centerpiece which is hard to get your head around, this gritty film is fraught with character exaggerations so extreme as to make for poor credibility. Nonetheless, for those who can make the huge leap of faith required to buy into this drama, there is a touching story of the best and the worst of humanity in counterpoise with a somewhat poetic narrative. "Zigzag" is a misfire which seems to have a clear purpose with a flawed execution. C+
  • This film premiered to a packed house in Narrative Feature competition at the South By South West film festival in Austin on 3/10/2002. It was a well-crafted, touching directorial debut by a David Goyer, a writer/director whose screenwriting efforts have given him a keen sense of story.

    John Leguizamo shines as a "Big Brother" to the mildly retarded/autistic 15 year old "ZigZag" Fletcher, played with uncharacteristic maturity by young Sam Jones III. Their rich and mutually supportive multi-level relationship casts Leguizamo as brother, father, protector, social worker and buddy, extending even to a hilarious semi- paternal explanation of human development. Jones captures the internal dialogues of autism with a restrained, mostly tic-free performance, yet delivers a believable teen's view of the syndrome.

    Oliver Platt revels in a wonderfully rich and funny supporting role, Natasha Lyonne delivers a rich performance as a hooker with a heart and Wesley Snipes casts a dark shadow indeed as a crack-addicted abusive father. But it is Sam Jones III who is the heart and soul of the film, and ultimately why we care to see it unfold. Goyer has made an impressive film indeed, richly characterized and genuinely moving, if a bit muddled in parts. But I was willing to forgive a bit of muddle for a chance to share the difficult lives of characters about whom I grew to genuinely care .
  • Not a big fan of Jon Leguizamo, but I would have to say this is the best I've seen him! Sam Jones plays Zig Zag, a sweet 15-year-old autistic boy, dragged down by his abusive, drug using, loser of a father, played by Wesley Snipes. Hard times hit for Zig Zag and he chooses to steal money from his place of employment to appease his father, not good. In steps the "Big Brother" Dean Singer, Jon L, to save the day, and he tries his hardest.

    The story is great, the characters are great and I am now a big fan of Jon L!

    8 * out 10!
  • This is based on a book of the same name that is the first directorial effort of one of my personal favorites, David Goyer, the screenwriter of Dark City, Blade, and Blade II. The story of an autistic boy and those that are part of his life, it definitely isn't of the usual material he works with, but it still has his touch and was really enjoyable for a small drama. I hope he manages to get distribution for a wide release with this one, but there's no telling where that'll end up. We saw it as a premiere at SXSW 2002 in front of a general audience and it got a great response from the crowd for both the dramatic elements and the moments of humor. Also, again I noticed that Goyer was sitting across the aisle from us in the theater and looked like he really got a boost from the audience response. He deserved it. The acting was as good as his writing and John Leguizamo, Wesley Snipes, Sam Jones III, and Oliver Platt played their parts to perfection.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Zig Zag (Sam Jones III) is an autistic kid from an abusive household. He also has a verbally abusive boss, Mr. Walters (Oliver Platt). It seems that all he would know is abuse if it weren't for his acting big brother, Dean Singer (John Leguizamo).

    When I say autistic, Zig Zag is on the spectrum, but he's not like Rainman. He's more like a Dr. Seah Murphy from "The Good Doctor" except a worse portrayal of an autistic kid. Zig Zag was good at memorizing numbers and he got himself in a jam when he stole money from his boss after seeing him open his safe. The rest of the movie was Singer and his effort to return the money.

    This movie brings a few questions to mind.

    1. How does a fifteen-year-old autistic boy legally work?

    2. Why is an autistic kid in regular classes with non-autistic kids

    3. Since when does LAPD have time to spend investigating a theft for more than thirty minutes it takes to have the victim fill out a report (even if it was $9000).

    4. Since when do autistic individuals violently scheme (Zig Zag walloped his boss over the head for know apparent reason)?

    "Zig Zag" just failed to launch and it was largely due to the lack of believability. Sam Jones III did a little head bob, poked out his lip, and spoke like a ten-year-old and that was his version of autism. I'm far from an expert on autism, but I just didn't buy it.