Deadwood (2004–2006)

TV Series   |  TV-MA   |    |  Crime, Drama, History


Episode Guide
Deadwood (2004) Poster

A show set in the late 1800s, revolving around the characters of Deadwood, South Dakota; a town of deep corruption and crime.

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8.7/10
80,773

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  • Powers Boothe and Ian McShane in Deadwood (2004)
  • Keone Young in Deadwood (2004)
  • Molly Parker in Deadwood (2004)
  • Gerald McRaney in Deadwood (2004)
  • Ricky Jay in Deadwood (2004)
  • Michael Keyes in Deadwood (2004)

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Cast & Crew

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Creator:

David Milch

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User Reviews


23 July 2004 | cablemonkey
Polished yet in the rough
Though i never considered myself a western fan, i realize i've seen a good many, from the Anthony Mann masterpieces, to Leone's revolutionary films, to more recent flicks like Unforgiven. But none has moved me like Deadwood. While the series did have some ups and downs (like life itself), it is truly enchanting. The season finale alone is one of the most moving things i've seen on TV, and having rewatched it many times (the joy of tivo) i still find myself driven to tears. The dialog is fantastic, bordering on Shakespearean at times as others have pointed out. Its a shame that so many seem to be bothered by the language, perhaps i am just overly jaded. Remember though that profanity at that time was predominantly based on religion (or rather defiance of such). These days of course, hellfire and tarnation don't have quite the same effect. If the dialog were more "period", i imagine it would be like watching yosemite sam cast as swearengen (heaven forbid). In their translations of Kurasawa movies, Critereon has faced the same issues, and i agree with their and David Milch's choice. Stay true to the meaning and feeling, more than the literal. Especially with profanity, this is key. Profanity's entire purpose is to offend, and if it becomes through age or paradigm shift inoffensive, it loses all meaning and effectiveness. It helps bring us into the world of deadwood, and better understand and relate to the characters who live there. Which, IMHO, is a wondrous thing to experience.

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