The Da Vinci Code (2006)

PG-13   |    |  Mystery, Thriller


The Da Vinci Code (2006) Poster

A murder inside the Louvre, and clues in Da Vinci paintings, lead to the discovery of a religious mystery protected by a secret society for two thousand years, which could shake the foundations of Christianity.


6.6/10
396,305

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User Reviews


18 May 2006 | DICK STEEL
8
| A Nutshell Review: The Da Vinci Code
This movie is becoming as controversial as the book. Since the day it was announced that it's gonna be made, there were protests against it being done, and it has escalated to calls for boycotting, or banning the movie altogether. I'll not waste time and go into its controversies, nor discuss what's real and what's not. Neither will I explain in detail the plot, as I believe most of you readers would already have some vague idea of what it's about, or have read the book, since it's on the bestsellers list for months.

Rather, I'll evaluate the movie as it is, on how well it entertains. Those who wish to preach in my comment box, prepare to have those comments deleted, at my discretion. This is the stand I shall take, that this movie is entirely fictional, based on events which are used loosely, for the sole purpose of weaving a storyline that tries to be believable. I think some have already mentioned it's too successful in doing that, and may mislead people into thinking its theories presented, are real. However, don't take it too seriously, and if you wish to, use another proper platform to debunk the myths, not my movie review blog.

The structure of the movie, is exactly the same as the book. There is no change to the ending, despite some rumours that it will be different. Naturally, some of the detailed explanation that's given in the book, especially many three-way dialogue between Sophie- Robert-Leigh, have to be summarized in order to pace this movie into 2 1/2 hours. Herein lies the challenges. For those who've read the book, the movie offers nothing new, other than the gratification of watching events and characters play out on the big screen. For those who haven't read the book, the movie version should be decent enough to make you want to pick up the novel and read more into the controversial theories explained.

However, having being familiar with the plot and how the story unfolds, red herrings, character motivations, twists and all, it may leave those who've read the novel, a page-turner in every sense of the word, a bit wanting, that the pace could've been improved. Undoubtedly the pacing sags when it's time for some dialogue heavy moments, but I suppose that is unavoidable when you're revisiting material.

However, its presentation of these controversial dialogue moments coupled with special effects, that will make you go wow. Truly, the technique is nothing original, and some of the visuals used looked like Return of the King and Kingdom of Heaven rejects, but as a whole, combined with the narrative, it helps to present the controversies in a more palatable manner.

Casting, I felt, was spot on. Tom Hanks makes Robert Langdon pretty accessible, given Hanks' everyman demeanor, and Audrey Tautou makes a believable Sophie Neveu. Ian McKellen, probably THE actor with 2 summer blockbusters back to back (the other being X- Men 3), is convincing as the rich grail hunter Sir Leigh Teabing. Paul Bettany is chilling as the albino killer Silas, and Jean Reno and Alfred Molina round up the star studded cast as the detective Captain Fache and Bishop Aringarosa.

Much is said about the haunting soundtrack, but as far as I'm aware, there's nothing scary about it. Silas, in his scene of self-cleansing, is horrid enough though, as are some scenes of unexpected on screen violence that hit like a sack of potatoes falling from the sky.

In the end, in spite of all the controversies, perhaps Robert Langdon's line is poignant - if given a chance, would you rather destroy faith, or renew it? The book and the movie have provided an opportunity for the faith to renew itself, to debunk the myths and theories (which were developed loosely to make the story flow of course), and to generally point the curious to the direction and light the faith wants to show.

Otherwise, this Ron Howard movie makes a good summer popcorn flick, with the usual thrills and spills you'd come to expect with its superb production values.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the novel, Dan Brown claims that the Disney movie The Little Mermaid (1989) gave its heroine Ariel red hair as a reference to paganism, and a symbolic grail story. This is inaccurate. Ariel, in fact, had red hair to distinguish her from Madison in Splash (1984) (the first collaboration between Ron Howard and Tom Hanks). Tom Hanks went on to play Walt Disney in Saving Mr. Banks (2013).


Quotes

Silas: Stop now. Tell me where it is.
Silas: You and your brethren possess what is not rightfully yours.
Jacques Saunière: I... I don't know what you are talking about.
Silas: Is it a secret you will die for?
Jacques Saunière: Please.
Silas: As you wish.


Goofs

(at around 12 mins) When flying in the private jet and taking a call from Silas, the Bishop Aringarosa is using a cellular (GSM) phone. At this height, confirmed by a shot through the window revealing the clouds canopy below, it is impossible to get mobile network coverage.


Crazy Credits

Additional codes: Dan Brown


Alternate Versions

The film was originally shown to the UK censors in an unfinished form, with a temp score and sound mix. The BBFC advised Sony Pictures that sound levels during some acts of violence may be too impactful for the requested "12A" rating, so the film was likely to receive a 15 classification. When formally submitted, the final levels of sound effects on the completed soundtrack had reduced the strength of some acts of violence to an extent which made the film able to get a "12A" rating.


Soundtracks

Secrets
Written by
Flipper Dalton
Performed by Flipper Dalton, Libera Benedetti & Irina Björklund (as Irina Bjorklund)
Courtesy of Da Silva Entertainment

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Mystery | Thriller

Details

Release Date:

19 May 2006

Language

English, French, Latin, Spanish


Country of Origin

USA, Malta, France, UK

Filming Locations

Rue Saint-Georges, Paris 9, Paris, France

Box Office

Budget:

$125,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$77,073,388 21 May 2006

Gross USA:

$217,536,138

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$760,006,945

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