The Lottery (1969)

  |  Short, Horror, Mystery


The Lottery (1969) Poster

An adaptation of Shirley Jackson's short story of the same name, "The Lottery" tells the story of a shocking annual tradition in a small village.


7.2/10
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User Reviews


4 February 2015 | cocacolanut
10
| Unforgettable
While the production quality of this short film is lacking, especially by today's standards, the impact lingers. I first saw this film in American Liturature class my Junior year of high school. I have never forgotten it. Thirty-eight years later, I am still wanting to know, "Why?"

Viewing it today, in 2015, I think of the personalities and reactions of the townspeople; as a member of one evangelical church and an employee of another, I relate these people to members of the church, and the impact their beliefs and decisions have on the rest of the congregation. As an individual, I question why I have hung on dearly to some traditions, and how selfish it can be to do so. Which doesn't mean that all tradition is bad - we just need to carefully examine why we do what we do.

Watch this film without critiquing the cinematography or getting caught up in the outdated fashion. Just get lost in the story - it's amazing how easy it is to do in just 17 minutes.

Critic Reviews



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Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Short | Horror | Mystery

Details

Release Date:

1969

Language

English


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Fellows, California, USA

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