V for Vendetta (2005)

R   |    |  Action, Drama, Sci-Fi


V for Vendetta (2005) Poster

In a future British tyranny, a shadowy freedom fighter, known only by the alias of "V", plots to overthrow it with the help of a young woman.

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8.2/10
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  • Tim Pigott-Smith and Hugo Weaving in V for Vendetta (2005)
  • V for Vendetta (2005)
  • Hugo Weaving at an event for V for Vendetta (2005)
  • John Hurt and Roger Allam in V for Vendetta (2005)
  • Hugo Weaving in V for Vendetta (2005)
  • Gina Gershon at an event for V for Vendetta (2005)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


17 October 2018 | zippybottom
8
| Great film
I wish they'd make a sequel to this. Portman and Weaving do a fine job bringing this vigilante flick to life.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Alan Moore, writer of the original graphic novel, greatly disliked the film, criticizing the script for "having plot holes you wouldn't have gotten away with on Wizzer and Chips in the 1960s". He ended cooperation with his publisher, DC Comics, after its corporate parent, Warner Brothers, failed to retract statements about Moore's supposed endorsement of the film. Joel Silver said at a press conference that Lana Wachowski had talked with Moore, and that "Moore was very excited about what Lana had to say." Moore disputed this, reporting that he told Wachowski "I didn't want anything to do with films. I wasn't interested in Hollywood," and demanded that DC Comics force Warner Brothers to issue a public retraction and apology for Silver's "blatant lies". Although Silver called Moore directly to apologize, no public retraction appeared. Moore was quoted as saying that the comic book had been "specifically about things like fascism and anarchy. The words 'fascism' and 'anarchy' occur nowhere in the film. It's been turned into a Bush-era parable by people too timid to set a political satire in their own country." This conflict between Moore and DC Comics was the subject of an article in The New York Times on March 12, 2006, five days before the U.S. release. In the New York Times article, Silver stated that about twenty years prior to the film's release, he met with Moore and David Gibbons when Silver acquired the film rights to V For Vendetta and Watchmen. Silver stated: "Alan was odd, but he was enthusiastic and encouraging us to do this. I had foolishly thought that he would continue feeling that way today, not realizing that he wouldn't." Moore did not deny this meeting, nor Silver's characterization of Moore at that meeting, nor did Moore state that he advised Silver of his change of opinion in those approximately twenty years. The New York Times article also interviewed David Lloyd about Moore's reaction to the film's production, stating, "Mr. Lloyd, the illustrator of V for Vendetta, also found it difficult to sympathize with Mr. Moore's protests. When he and Mr. Moore sold their film rights to the comic book, Mr. Lloyd said: "We didn't do it innocently. Neither myself nor Alan thought we were signing it over to a board of trustees who would look after it like it was the Dead Sea Scrolls.""


Quotes

Evey Hammond: Remember, remember, the Fifth of November, the Gunpowder Treason and Plot. I know of no reason why the Gunpowder Treason should ever be forgot... But what of the man? I know his name was Guy Fawkes and I know, in 1605, he attempted to blow up the ...


Goofs

The original Guy Fawkes (of the gunpowder plot) was depicted dangling while hanging, kicking about until he finally succumbed. In historical reality he was sentenced to be "hanged, drawn, and quartered". He jumped when he was hanged so that he would die instantly to avoid the horrific "quartering" part of the then-usual English punishment for treason.


Crazy Credits

Part of the closing credits is of a red line forming the V symbol, with characters' faces appearing in the red line alongside the actors' credits.


Soundtracks

The Beginning... At Last
Written and Performed by
Zakk Wylde's Black Label Society
Courtesy of June Street Entertainment

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Drama | Sci-Fi | Thriller

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