Human Trafficking (TV Mini-Series 2005)

TV Mini-Series   |    |  Crime, Drama, Mystery


Episode Guide
Human Trafficking (2005) Poster

Hundreds of thousands of young women have vanished from their everyday lives-forced by violence into a hellish existence of brutality and prostitution. They're a profitable commodity in the... See full summary »


7.6/10
6,564


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  • Catherine Bérubé in Human Trafficking (2005)
  • Mira Sorvino and Michael Sorvino at an event for Human Trafficking (2005)
  • Sarah-Jeanne Labrosse in Human Trafficking (2005)
  • Donald Sutherland at an event for Human Trafficking (2005)
  • Donald Sutherland and Christian Duguay at an event for Human Trafficking (2005)
  • Donald Sutherland in Human Trafficking (2005)

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19 February 2006 | TBJCSKCNRRQTreviews
8
| An impressive mini-series
Human Trafficking is an important tale about an important subject. Too often ignored, because it's easier to live in an illusory world than face the awful truth. This was a necessary series, and a well-thought out premise... the execution doesn't live entirely up to it, but it comes pretty darn close. The main problem is cinematography... very much in the spirit of Paul Greengrass, much(luckily, not all) of the filming is done with hand-held cameras. Apparently believed to raise intensity, it more often than not has the viewer blinking at the screen to avoid the effects of on-the-spot focus adjusting(blurring the image and then readjusting it, for the uninitiated) and struggling to figure out what's going on, as the image is poorly framed and basically looks like they just ran the scene through a few times while a few half-cooked camera-men ran around with a hand-held camera each, and just pieced it together from the best footage(which, I can tell you now, is often less than great). I wonder what happened to quality filming? What happened to setting up difficult shots, attention to detail and careful planning? Hitchcock and Kubrick must be turning in their graves. Another problem is acting... Yes, Sorvino does better than what we've really seen her do before(one should pause and wonder if that really is saying all that much, though), but she still spends an awful lot of time reverting to the deer-caught-in-headlights glare that she became famous for. She does, however, do something that impressed me and caught me by surprise, near the end of the series. Anyone who watches(or who already has) will recognize it almost instantly; pay close attention to when she is asked to "change/fix her eyes". That was an unexpected, and very positive, surprise. Sutherland does good, as usual, but it would be a lie to claim that this character is all that different from what he mostly plays. Carlyle was rather great. One has to wonder, though, with all the actors available... they had to cast a Scotsman(I know, we think of him as British, but check his profile) as a Russian? And a French-Canadian(Girard)? However, going back to the positive... this was a truly astounding piece of infotainment. The writing is excellent. Dramatic moments, while plentiful and played for effect, are never really sappy or overly sentimental. The series has heart, contains cynicism, as well. This mix makes for a very realistic yet not hopeless product... as if this is saying to us: "Yes, human trafficking exists, and it's awful... but we can fight it. We can beat it." And somehow... with the lack of Hollywood stereotypes and the ever-present realism... we believe that it's true. I recommend this to anyone who wants to know the truth and are not afraid to have it told to them, with little to no censorship provided to soften the blow. 8/10

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