Schwartz Dynasty (2005)

  |  Comedy


Schwartz Dynasty (2005) Poster

The Schwartz Dinasty belong to a long tradition of Jewish rabbis. The grandfathers took their faith and turned it into deeds coming to the Land of Israel to start a new life and build a country.


7/10
134

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


24 December 2006 | dromasca
6
| melodramatic view of today's Israel
The Schwartz Dinasty belong to a long tradition of Jewish rabbis. The grandfathers took their faith and turned it into deeds coming to the Land of Israel to start a new life and build a country. Where are their descendants and how are they doing in the Israel of today? One possible answer is given in this film. It's not the best treatment the theme can get, and not the best it actually got in the Israeli cinema later. Yet, it's a possible answer. There are a few other themes that come together here. One is the way the Israeli society today accommodates the new immigrants coming from the former Soviet Union with a blurring Jewish tradition and an set of problems that did not exist in the previous waves of immigration. The other is the intolerance of the religious system based on the Jwewish orthodox doctrine towards the problems of life and death, which marginalizes many of the characters in the film.

The authors chose a mix of comedy and melodrama which despite the fact that it's less vulgar than in the usual Israeli 'boorekas' movies is still trying to connect too much with the audience by means of cheap laughs rather than feelings. See the role and acting of Tal Friedman and Dov Navonm who seem to come directly from the set of the most popular comic TV show in Israel (kind of an Israeli SNL) where they are principal stars. And yet, when getting the tragedy dimensions the act of Mirima Zohar is splendid, and when showing the atmosphere and style of life of the immigrants the mix of comic and melodrama is just right. A film to watch especially by the Israeli audience, and those interested in Israeli life.

Critic Reviews


Details

Release Date:

21 July 2005

Language

Hebrew, Russian, Yiddish


Country of Origin

Israel

Contribute to this page

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com