WALL·E (2008)

G   |    |  Animation, Adventure, Family


WALL·E (2008) Poster

In the distant future, a small waste-collecting robot inadvertently embarks on a space journey that will ultimately decide the fate of mankind.

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  • Sigourney Weaver in WALL·E (2008)
  • Brenda Song at an event for WALL·E (2008)
  • Jeff Garlin in WALL·E (2008)
  • Cheech Marin at an event for WALL·E (2008)
  • WALL·E (2008)
  • John Ratzenberger in WALL·E (2008)

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20 July 2008 | Bumblebee_Man
9
| WALL-E: A Wonderful Achievement
When it comes to animated films, Pixar are masters of the craft. Ever since their feature film debut, the magnificent 'Toy Story', the animation studio have brought us such instant classics as 'Monsters Inc.', 'The Incredibles' and 'Finding Nemo', a film which remains as one of the biggest selling DVDs of all time. Surely it's about time that they delivered us a bad film? Well, sorry to disappoint, but Pixar's 'WALL-E' is among not only their greatest work, but among the greatest animations ever produced.

The film opens with some astonishing shots of a desolate, rubbish-laden, polluted Earth; a boldly dark opening for a family oriented feature. It is amidst these dystopian surroundings, however, that our hero - arguably more adorable than a basket full of puppies and kittens - is first introduced to us. WALL-E is a character of genius; combining elements of Johnny 5, Charlie Chaplin and Mr. Bean, Andrew Stanton (Director) and crew have created something that will no doubt go down in history with R2-D2 as one as the screen's most memorable machines.

It is the 22nd Century, and mankind have left Earth in giant Space Cruisers waiting for the surface of their planet to finally become habitable again. 700 years have past, and WALL-E (Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-Class), is the last of a group of robots left to clean up the planet. In a disturbing sequence, our hero ventures home through trash heaps laden with 'dead' WALL-E's... another sign that this is not the usually Pixar fare, but something more meaningful, more bold, more... adult in theme. And this is what the first act of the film is. WALL-E, accompanied by his pet cockroach (who, as a testament to Pixar's genius, we grow to care for just as much as the metal man himself), goes about his daily routine. It is in this mostly silent section of the film that we grow to love WALL-E. As he rumages through human garbage, finding interest in things that seem mundane to us, we discover that after all these years, this little robot has developed something that makes him seem more to us than an animated clunk of cogs and rust... a personality. His incredibly curious nature make for some of the most adorable moments depicted in film (including moments such as WALL-E meets car keys and WALL-E meets... bra). We delve further into this intriguing personality when we invited into the little guy's 'house', a storage space for all his collected junk. Whilst WALL-E watches a VCR of the musical 'Hello, Dolly!", we see from his large, emotional eyes and clasping hands that he is, heartbreakingly, all alone on this immense world.

Then, the following day, as WALL-E goes about his trash-cube-making business, something extraordinary, both to us and WALL-E, occurs. A space ship touches down on the surface, holding within it EVE, a futuristic, Ipod-resembling droid here to scout the earth for plant-life... and WALL-E's one true love (aww).

This love story eventually leaps from Earth into space and onto The Axiom, an immense Space Ship on which a large number of the American population - depicted as lazy, obese, consumerist slobs - go about the same mundane routine day in, day out. Message heavy, but never preachy. In the end, through WALL-E, everyone learns the true meanings of life: Love and the relationships with those around us. Oh, and to take care of the planet, of course.

Beautiful visuals, astonishing characterisation and a sequence with WALL-E and EVE floating through space that is more romantic than anything your likely to see this year, make 'WALL-E' an outstanding achievement that proudly stands among Pixar's finest work. WALL-E is a completely realised character, and one which I am sure we have not seen the last of. Although, some would argue, not as accessible as other films in the genre (some children may grow resteless during the film's earlier, dialogue-free sequences), 'WALL-E' will leave a lasting impression on cinema goers of all ages.

And that is the genius of Pixar. The only studio ever to create films that are, truly, 'for all the family'.

-Dan Henry, 20th July 2008

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Producer Jim Morris invited leading special effects artist Dennis Muren and cinematographer Roger Deakins to advise on lighting and atmosphere. Muren actually ended up spending several months working at Pixar, while Deakins - who was only supposed to host one talk - ended up staying for two weeks.


Quotes

Voice in commercial: Too much garbage in your face? There's plenty of space out in space! BnL StarLiners leaving each day. We'll clean up the mess while you're away.


Goofs

EVE is shown as one of many bots to be sent to one of a multitude of possible life sustaining planets. When EVE returns to the Axiom and presents the plant, the ship automatically assumes it is from Earth. If the ship was programmed to return to Earth upon receiving a plant of any origin, sending multiple EVE bots would serve no purpose. However, when the captain analyzes the dirt WALL-E left on him, the computer describes the dirt as "Earth"; the Holo-Detector most likely is able to similarly analyze the dirt the plant is growing in. Also, nothing in the film actually states or shows that the EVE probes are investigating any planets other than Earth; it's more probable that multiple probes are instead being dispatched to a variety of locations on Earth. If you're looking for evidence that plants are again growing on Earth, it doesn't make much sense to send a single probe to investigate the entire planet. It makes even less sense to look for active vegetation on Earth by sending probes to places that are not Earth. EVE units are probably delivered to various locales on Earth periodically to check for plant life. The speed with which the shuttle returns to pick up EVE after she signals it suggests that it didn't go very far away, and it costs a lot of energy for a rocket to "turn around" on a moment's notice when it's heading away, so it's unlikely that it was en route to another star system; it was probably in a holding orbit around Earth, Luna, or Sol, from which it could easily return without excessive energy expenditure, waiting for either the next scheduled probe drop or a signal from a probe indicating that it found something.


Crazy Credits

In the international versions, additional credits with dubbing information are shown after the main credits, during which Wall-E turns different objects into cubes of garbage. At the end, two gigantic Wall-A robots collide in the front of the screen.


Alternate Versions

End credits for international versions feature additional credits footage with dubbing information for each language. This footage also contains animation of WALL·E not seen in the English version of the film: WALL·E in 80s CGI graphics style compacts two vertical rows of different objects into cubes of garbage. Eventually, two WALL·A robots collide in the front of the screen, closing the credits.


Soundtracks

Also Sprach Zarathustra
Written by
Richard Strauss

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Animation | Adventure | Family | Sci-Fi

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