The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

R   |    |  Biography, Crime, Drama


The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) Poster

Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, from his rise to a wealthy stock-broker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.2/10
1,011,233

Videos


Photos

  • Kyle Chandler and Ted Griffin in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Rachel Winter and Terence Winter at an event for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Jon Bernthal in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Jean Dujardin in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


3 February 2014 | gavin6942
8
| A Three-Hour Bacchanalia Caught on Film
Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), from his rise to a wealthy stockbroker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government.

As of now (February 2014), this film sits at an impressive #57 on IMDb's list of greatest films of all time. Using that as a jumping off point for this review, we will have to scale it back a bit. Whether the film should be on the list is debatable, but certainly not within the top 100 -- it is neither that good nor among director Martin Scorsese's best work.

Along the same lines, the Oscar nomination for Best Picture is a bit much. While there is no denying it was probably among the ten best films of 2013, with some incredible acting and more than adequate cinematography and editing, the very fact it has no chance of winning makes one question why even nominate the film at all. (Of course, without nine nominees, we would be back to having the reasonable number of five...)

Scorsese received a best director nomination, and this strikes me as more understandable. He managed to assemble an impressive cast and tell a story that is both compelling and entertaining, without trying to put some moral tag on it. Whether or not the viewer thinks this is a glorification or denouncement of the acts depicted is up to them, as the film itself is blank (in the best way).

While on the subject, could the drug use and sexuality have been toned down? Absolutely. And there is a good argument that they should have been (especially the non-stop sex, which comes across as gratuitous and only adds more minutes to this lengthy financial epic). Another argument says the events are extremely unlikely and exaggerated at times. And this is probably also true; but the film is accurate to the memoir, not reality, and this is Belfort telling his story with all the embellishments that come with it. If you want just the facts, read the court transcripts.

Leonardo DiCaprio is nominated for best actor, and this is a choice that is understandable and yet hard to rally behind. He truly becomes Belfort, and probably makes the man out to be even more wild than he was. That deserves a nomination. But this is not DiCaprio's best role (he has also done a fine job portraying Howard Hughes and J. Edgar Hoover) and not one he deserves the win for.

Jonah Hill, on the other hand, was amazing and deserves to win his supporting actor category. Being up again Jared Leto, he probably has no chance, but Hill has come a long way in a few short years from a lovable doofus in "Superbad" to a formidable actor in his own right. At first, "Moneyball" seemed to be an anomaly in Hil's career, but he showed the world he could do even better when he became Donny Azoff in this picture. Incredible.

Whether Terence Winter deserves Best Adapted Screenplay for this film is unclear without having read the book. Such a nomination seems fair, though the win is hard to say without more familiarity. I am surprised no nominations came for cinematography or editing, which are strong in their subtlety. But oh well.

Of the film's five nominations, it may walk away with one win (Winter) or two at most (DiCaprio). More likely it will walk away empty-handed. The film is not flawless (we could go on about how awkward the soundtrack was) and may or may not go on to be memorable for much more than its nudity and pervasive cursing.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Django Unchained

    Django Unchained

  • Shutter Island

    Shutter Island

  • Inglourious Basterds

    Inglourious Basterds

  • Catch Me If You Can

    Catch Me If You Can

  • Inception

    Inception

  • Fight Club

    Fight Club

  • Forrest Gump

    Forrest Gump

  • Pulp Fiction

    Pulp Fiction

  • Kill Bill: Vol. 1

    Kill Bill: Vol. 1

  • Gladiator

    Gladiator

  • Interstellar

    Interstellar

  • Reservoir Dogs

    Reservoir Dogs

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Biography | Crime | Drama

The Shows Everyone Will Be Talking About This Week

Get ahead of the buzz with these must-watch shows: A dark sci-fi prequel, huge performances at the Oscars, and a star-studded new season of mockumentaries. Presented by M&M's.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com