The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

R   |    |  Biography, Crime, Drama


The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) Poster

Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, from his rise to a wealthy stock-broker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government.

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8.2/10
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  • Jon Bernthal in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Jemima Rooper at an event for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Kyle Chandler and Ted Griffin in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Jemima Rooper at an event for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

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17 December 2013 | Serge_Zehnder
Where Human Flaws Make a Rotten Core
Brilliantly acted, superbly written and as one would expect from a picture by Martin Scorsese, it is a masterclass of directorial craft.

Showy when it needs to be, but also quiet and contemplative. "The Wolf of Wall Street" is the equivalent of something like "Good Fellas" or even more so "Casino" but set in the world of finance. The suits might be more expensive but the people who wear them are just as sick and violent as their street-mob counterparts. Sardonic in humor and unflinching in showing the depravity of its characters, it marks somewhat of a different approach to the world of stock-trading than Oliver Stone's "Wall Street".

Where Stone seems more in line with Bertold Brecht who considered theater (or in this case film) a moral institution, does Scorsese take the position of the omnipresent observer of the dark side of the American and in many cases the human dream.

Leonard DiCaprio gives another stellar performance of great intensity and even greater tragedy while this tale of corruption, greed and self-righteousness unfolds.

It's a vast panorama that shows how during the last twenty-five to thirty years gullibility as well as our innate greed make all of us accomplices in this never-ending pyramid scheme far away from any reality.

One could almost hear Scorsese's clerical background come to the fore again, according to which nobody is without sin, and therefore we are all susceptible to corruption.

It is our decision on which side we choose to live that makes the difference. For every individual but also society as a whole.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

For the deposition scenes, the actors were merely instructed by Martin Scorsese to avoid saying anything important, or anything at all. They have the freedom to improvise how to do that. Editor Thelma Schoonmaker said that these scenes, some of them 20-minute long, were hysterical due to the things they came up with.


Quotes

Chester Ming: I can sell anything. Shit, I can sell lubes to a convent full of nuns, get 'em so horny they'll be fucking each other in the coffers.


Goofs

When Jordan is leaving the country club and crawls to the steps, the number of steps changes (dramatically increases) when viewed from Jordan's perspective and also when he rolls down them. This isn't a continuity error. Because Jordan was high on drugs his perspective of reality was affected, so to him there were more steps to navigate. Just as he later claimed to have driven home without scratching the car, when he had actually trashed it. His perspective of reality was affected by the drugs.


Crazy Credits

The film opens with a Stratton Oakmont advertisement hosted by Jordan Belfort. The film title appears only at the ending.


Alternate Versions

News reports in local media have said the version of Wolf of Wall Street (2013) showing in Abu Dhabi cinemas removes 45 minutes of content. Aside from nudity and sexual situations, most of the edits come from the film's 500+ curse words. Time Out Abu Dhabi reported offensive language was removed by "either by muting the audio temporarily or chopping chunks from scenes mid sentence, which produces a jarring effect for viewers."


Soundtracks

Boom Boom
Written by
John Lee Hooker
Performed by John Lee Hooker
Courtesy of Vee-Jay Limited Partnership

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Biography | Crime | Drama

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