The Missing Person (2009)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama


The Missing Person (2009) Poster

Private detective John Rosow is hired to tail a man on a train from Chicago to Los Angeles. Rosow gradually uncovers the man's identity as a missing person; one of the thousands presumed ... See full summary »


6.1/10
1,408

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  • The Missing Person (2009)
  • Michael Shannon and Noah Buschel pose for a portrait during the 2009 Sundance Film Festival held at the Film Lounge Media Center on January 21, 2009 in Park City, Utah.
  • Betsy Hogg as Melody Hayward.
  • Michael Shannon and Lynne McCollough.
  • The Missing Person (2009)
  • Michael Shannon as John Rosow.

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23 January 2009 | jonahsavant
9
| The Best Film at Sundance. An original.
After seeing "Neal Cassady" at the Woodstock Film Festival last year, I was interested to see what young director Noah Buschel would do with the noir genre. I was not disappointed.

Like his beat "biopic," Buschel turns the genre right on it's head and makes something completely fresh and new. "The Missing Person" has very little to do with it's surface elements, and much more to do with innovative and original film-making.

Michael Shannon delivers his best performance to date. It's him in full movie star wattage. He looks great, he sounds great, and he makes a great damaged hero. The rest of the cast is so superb you almost wish there was more of them in the film.

Perhaps the best use of jazz music I've heard in a film.

There will be those who want a faster paced movie. More violence and quickness and loudness. They should just watch "Brick." That was a good example of a shallow neo-noir. This is not "Brick." This is a deep and unique film about loss. And also, somehow, a hilarious film about loss.

Geoffrey Gilmore, the festival director, introduced "The Missing Person" the night I saw it at Sundance. He said that it was the first film accepted at Sundance this year and that Buschel was doing something no one else was doing right now, which was going back to old forms and making them new again. A lost art, he said. Something that 70's directors used to do a lot.

The key point he made was that "The Missing Person" was an utterly unique film in the guise of a noir film. I couldn't agree more.

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