The Limits of Control (2009)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Mystery


The Limits of Control (2009) Poster

The story of a mysterious loner, a stranger in the process of completing a criminal job.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

6.3/10
17,956

Videos


Photos

  • John Hurt in The Limits of Control (2009)
  • Isaach De Bankolé at an event for The Limits of Control (2009)
  • Isaach De Bankolé and Tilda Swinton in The Limits of Control (2009)
  • John Hurt at an event for The Limits of Control (2009)
  • Michael Imperioli at an event for The Limits of Control (2009)
  • Gael García Bernal at an event for The Limits of Control (2009)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Awards

1 win.

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


11 August 2011 | jayraskin1
Occasionally Charming But Too Long and Slow
I guess for Jim Jarmusch, the shot, not the characters or the narrative is the building block and center of the film. Each shot is almost a minor Magritte painting with some detail incongruous enough to make us chuckle or wonder WTF. Why does the lead character order two cups of espresso? Why does the character wear those too tight shiny suits? What is the meaning of the constant exchanging of match boxes? This movie could be called "Match boxes and coffee" instead of "Cigarettes and Coffee," an even slower movie Jarmusch. The narrative is without excitement or tension. For a brief moment I had hoped that Jarmusch would pick up the pace when the hero saw the armed camp/complex. I thought the hero would race down and shoot ten or twenty men and jump out of the way of army jeeps and bound over walls to get inside. Nope, not this movie. Jarmusch just has the character appear inside the complex in the next scene and mysteriously hint at the way he got in. The movie does pick up in about five or six scenes with Paz De La Huerta. She is just called Nude and she appears in a series of what seems like nude poses. It is quite erotic and does make the first half of the picture move entertaining. There is also a nice dialogue scene about Orson Welles "Lady from Shanghai." These are the highlights of the film for me ten minutes watching Paz De La Huerta act without clothes, a discussion of "Lady from Shanghai" and those too tight shiny suits. Amusing, but too laid back.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Shay Mitchell on Why Everyone Is Obsessed With "You"

The "You" star shares how social media became its own character in the psychological thriller, and why people can't stop watching.

Watch our interview

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com