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  • smirish10 November 2011
    The show is about one very flawed woman's struggle to become a better and healthier person. She's clearly lost, but dedicated and passionate in a way which makes you admire her and be annoyed by her at the same time. The show does a neat trick of manipulating the viewer into alternatively mocking her because of her naivete and flakiness, and cheering for her out of empathy, both back and forth within single episodes. You come to expect her to crash and burn in a tragic and comedic fashion. Yet in the end, she claims small victories of enlightenment that put all of us in touch with our humanity and teach us a little bit about growth. The show is not preachy, yet makes its points poignantly and powerfully.

    I'm excited with anticipation as to where the show may go and hope it is renewed despite the poor ratings so far. Definitely my favorite new show of the season.
  • Rogue-3211 March 2013
    So here we have Mike White doing what he does best: spearheading a project that's one part subversive, one part cynical, one part hopeful and one part lethally and blackly comic.

    Enlightened works on many levels because of this but it's also this uber-quirky quality that turns a lot of people who don't have the patience or the understanding of what they're watching off.

    Dern's Amy Jellicoe character is not likable, which is a huge gamble from the get-go,especially for a female character; men on TV shows - as in real life - tend to be given far more leeway, to say the least. All the characters on the show are deeply flawed, of course, but these people are not caricatures, they're all three-dimensional and doing the best they can at their respective levels of consciousness.

    It's interesting how Amy, beginning in season one, had been trying to find some sort of inner peace but soon as she returns to work at her vile company, that intention flies out the window.Rather than quitting her job, as anyone who genuinely was seeking peace would most likely do, she stays and takes on a new, seemingly better, more 'important' ego identity: agent of change. This is hilarious to me, because in substituting one ego identity for another she is still as lost and as fragmented as she was in the very beginning, if not more so. I'm hoping that White understands this, because I'm not sure how enlightened he actually is(because the actual subject of the title has not been dealt with in anything but superficial terms), but either way it plays as good television.

    My favorite episode was the one in season two called The Ghost Is Seen, where White's basically sadsack character Tyler narrates instead of Amy, sharing with the audience about how he feels invisible, how he's lonely, how his life has been empty, until he meets Eileen, played beautifully by the always wonderful Molly Shannon. Ironically, of course - this is a Mike White show, remember - he's in the process of betraying her as they speak, breaking into her computer to get lethally damaging evidence against the company. This episode was brilliantly written and enacted, with White's voice-over narration being profoundly moving.

    I only hope he gets a chance for a third season; in light of all the garbage that gets renewed - like Girls, for instance - I think this show warrants another shot, at the very least. UPDATED 3/20/13: Cancelled. Too subversive for HBO, apparently. Not surprised.
  • I started Enlightened around a week ago, mostly because the Golden Globes put it on the spot. As far as first seasons go, this was an excellent one. It balances comedy and drama extremely well. Some episodes are more dramatic, some more comedic, but it always remains top notch.

    Laura Dern in the character of Amy is completely fantastic. She owns this character, which is perhaps one of TV's most fascinating and confusing. Amy has our sympathy, we still want her to succeed, and she always pretty much wants to look at things in a positive way. The problem is though, she isn't the person she wishes. She makes you feel her problems, yet also cringe and shake your head at the way she approaches aspects in her life. She's a good person who wants to do good things, but she can also be extremely selfish and lacks any sort of self-awareness. Even in her most sticky situations, you want to root for her but you see her like many of her co-workers do... in a negative light. Dern sells it all. Diane Ladd is also pretty fantastic as her distant, yet also sympathetic and sometimes infuriating mother. But even she gets her own episode, which is perhaps the show's most touching and dramatic episode.

    Overall, this is an excellent mix of drama with both dark and light comedy. I feel it's sort of underrated and has gotten lost among other big-name shows.
  • I'm hoping I'm not the only one out here who loves HBO's Enlightened. While still a bit uneven script to script, Laura Dern and Mike White's show is quirky, funny, irritating, raw, and human - bringing to mind Michael Tolkin's 1994 film, The New Age, minus the corrosive cynicism.

    Dern portrays 'seeker' Amy Jellicoe straight up, with all her foibles: unvarnished, selfish, pretentious and trying hard to change. I'm pretty sure most of us get Amy's brand of supercilious self-righteousness, the kind we get when we want so much to change others, while avoiding the change that begins with ourselves. Co-creator Mike White is heartbreakingly sympathetic, hilarious and a great foil for Dern.

    Unfortunately Enlightened brings to mind a few other wonderful shows where our imaginary friends disappeared within a season or so: My So Called Life, Beggars and Choosers, Canada's Intelligence, among them. Sometimes the grit is just a little too real, the subject a little too off-beat for mass consumption, with broadcasters not giving a show enough time to find its feet, and audiences robbed of the chance to bond with character.

    With apologies to Jimi Hendrix, a toast to Enlightened, 'Let your freak flag fly.'
  • sukhideol27 January 2012
    This show was not advertised in the UK, so I stumbled on this by accident and I'm so glad that I did. It is up there as a favourite now.

    This show reminds me of Nurse Jackie, another great show, where it allows you to judge whether you think the characters are right/wrong or good/bad - they are not telling you what to think of the characters.

    The cast is also great, both Laura Dern and Diane Ladd are fantastic as usual. I'm so pleased they have chosen to do TV because in recent years films have not taken notice of their great talents. Luke Wilson is the best I've ever seen him act. I love the motley crew of people she works with - great acting all round.

    Also a TV show where a person actually does a full time job without the job being the main premise of the show.
  • I cannot believe that only 0.123% of the American population watched this excellent TV series while 5900000 regularly tune into mind numbing bull like the X Factor!

    Sure the main character Amy is annoying at times with her kookiness but she is brilliantly portrayed by Laura Dern, no wonder she won a Golden Globe for the role and the rest of the cast are just excellent. Mike White, who plays Tyler and wrote the series, is a genius writer and actor. It's such a shame it wasn't picked up for a 3rd season. NETFLIX or Amazon should run with this.

    Wake-up America!
  • Warning: Spoilers
    "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." - Jiddu Krishnamurti

    An HBO TV series written and created by Mike White, "Enlightened" stars Laura Dern as Amy Jellico. Amy works within the marketing department of Abaddon Industries, the company aptly named after the Biblical "Abaddon" (a bottomless pit and place of destruction).

    "Enlightened" opens with Amy quite literally losing her mind. Driven insane by bastardly bosses and crummy corporate credos, Amy escapes to a "spiritual retreat" in which she learns "hippie values" and in which she has idyllic visions of sparkling waters and floating turtles. Why, Amy thinks, can't the whole world be like this? As such, Amy returns to Abaddon with a new evangel; she will impose upon the world a new reality, a new way of thinking, a new ethos! Everyone else thinks Amy's nuts.

    Toward the end of its first season, "Enlightened" becomes a comical political tract. Howard Zinn for the "Sex and the City" generation, Amy becomes a revolutionary outfitted in Prada and knock-off Gucci. Amy's original corporate values – a kind of Randian social Darwinism which trumpets extreme individualism and in which the only ethical precepts are those which sanction cutthroat competition – are thus swiftly replaced by more "enlightened" values (love, peace, respect, community, environmental concerns etc). Because Amy's scatterbrained and a little bit confused, these values are ill-defined and only superficially understood by Amy herself. Indeed, Amy initially treats these values as fashion accessories, little trinkets and badges of honour to be worn and displayed. Soon, Amy begins to display all the behavioural patterns of a cult-member, the poor girl clinging to these values in an attempt to be "born again" a "better", "saner" more "humane" person. White even goes to lengths to portray Amy as being hypocritical, vindictive and often angry.

    So what's great about "Enlightned" is that it portrays Amy's "enlightenment" as being a form of "instability". Her "enlightenment" is not a rational ideological choice, but rather the accidental byproduct of social rejection, social violence, personal stupidity, emotional wounds and of various self-defence mechanisms. In short, it is the world which radicalizes Amy and which then deems her insane for being radical. At the same time, White makes it clear that Amy's "craziness" is in fact a type of beautiful sanity. It is only in the eyes of an insane world that Amy appears a crackpot. As such, Amy is aggressively demonized, mocked and belittled by her "sane" co-workers, all of whom have been fully colonised by Abaddon's logic, jargon and values. These "sane" co-workers, of course, are slowly revealed to be deluded nuts. Or as George Orwell ironically pointed out in "1984": "Sanity is statistical. It is merely a question of learning to think as they thought." Abaddon wants you thinking like Abaddon thinks.

    "Enlightened's" second season watches as Amy attempts to reform Abaddon Industries. She attempts to implement a form of "green", "compassionate" and "sustainable capitalism", which are of course oxymora. When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom profit that loses, and, as activist Lucia Ortiz once said, asking "capitalism to transition to a Green Economy is like asking a tiger to become a vegetarian". Amy's wishes are thus a systemic impossibility; any system predicated upon exponential growth (in production, energy consumption, market expansion, interest based money creation etc) must ignore a variety of ecological, moral and social concerns just to stay alive. Already, for example, Earth Overshoot Day - the day on which we've used more of the planet's resources than it's able to replenish in a year — is steadily arriving earlier and earlier; it now takes an Earth and a half to support our current rate of resource extraction. By mid-century, under "modest" projections for population growth, we will need three Earths (about 85 percent of the world's population lives in countries that are overusing what they're able to replenish).

    So Amy is ultimately unable to slay Abaddon. Amy and a LA Times reporter (Dermot Mulroney) may run an expose on the company, but her values and its are incompatible and there can never be meaningful reconciliation.

    "Enlightened" finds Laura Dern doing her best work outside of David Lynch. Her character – a wholly original creation - is a roaring mass of contradictions and conflicting emotions, all of which Dern expertly conveys. Unfortunately White's series is a good five or six episodes too long, contains far too much padding and White would arguably have done better to adopt a more comedic tone. Indvidiaul episodes were directed by a number of well-known auteurs, including Jonathan Demme, Nicole Holofcener and White himself.

    8.5/10 – Daring and sophisticated. See White's "Year of the Dog", which sketches a similarly complex portrait of animal right's activism.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    'Enlightened' is not particularly easy to get into, which may be the reason for it not being discussed more often as a great show. I felt it flew a bit under the radar, but as I watched both of its seasons I realised that's not due to its quality.

    It took some guts for the writers to focus an entire show on a completely unlikable person such as Amy Jellicoe. 'The Sopranos' have a mob boss as the protagonist, 'Mad Men' a habitual adulterer, 'The Wire' focuses on gangsters and equally morally bankrupt policemen, politicians, etc., and Dexter is centred around a serial-killer, but all those shows manage to create sympathy for their protagonists by showing them as very flawed in certain aspects yet also very likable in others. We root for Dexter Morgan, Tony Soprano or Don Draper, but find little to create sympathy or empathy with Enlightened's egotistical, annoying, and narcissistic protagonist. It's a gamble, but one that pays off, I feel.

    Very few other shows manage to create such a good balance between comedy and drama, and portray a character as honestly without over-dramatising the bad nor the good sides. At its best 'Enlightened' is a spot-on character study of somebody you would never want to meet, that tells you a bit more about human nature. At its worst it still manages to be very entertaining, funny, as well as well-produced, superbly acted and fluidly paced.

    I, for one, like the first season a bit more, as I felt the 2nd season suffered from focusing on the plot too much, which left the characterisation a bit under-developed in season 2. Nonetheless, even that was very good television with moments that bordered on brilliance.

    It's a shame HBO canceled it, as I thought it was among the best shows on television alongside the still-running 'Mad Men' and 'Boardwalk Empire'.
  • Enlightened is about a woman who was unable to cope with a series of accumulated stresses in her life and decided to seek treatment. She returns to her life with a new awareness and feels compelled to share and engage people in that awareness to effect positive change around her, but she finds herself running up against resistance due to fear of change. The people around her are all coping with stress in their lives in various other ways. It's about confronting the loneliness and isolation that you can feel when your perspective differs from those around you, and how that loneliness is at odds with your desire to connect, help, and heal those around you. At the end of the day it's about the serenity prayer, about Amy learning the wisdom to know the difference between what she can change, and what she can't. A lot of mistakes are made in the process, but her heart is in the right place, and any introspective viewer will be able to relate to the struggle. I highly recommend it.
  • jimpowellsf29 December 2011
    I read somewhere that this show was one of the best new shows of the year, so I started watching it on demand. I find it to be a very interesting mix of humor, drama, and intrigue. Laura Dern is great as an almost completely unpredictable person. It's almost scary to say that her character is like more than a few people I've met in my life.

    This show covers work, home, friends, and life matters in a pretty realistic way. As in life, sometimes it's the verbal and sometimes it's the nonverbal communication that conveys the best message. The actors are doing a great job with the material, and I'm now on episode 7 and the show feels like it's getting even more interesting. I have to say, I'm pretty addicted to wanting to get to know these people more...and seeing where it all goes.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I wanted to see this series solely for Laura Dern. The first episode seemed okay. A woman has a meltdown at work after finding out that the boss she was having an affair with was transferring her out of her department. So she goes away to a retreat, fixes herself, and comes back to find that her old job has been filled, and she's got a new job...in the basement of the company working with computers.

    I thought that the story would develop as I got deeper into the series but that's where I was wrong. The series deals with Amy and her issues and we're left wondering if her Hawaiian retreat actually helped her or not. Each episode, with the exception of the second last one, deal's with one of Amy's hangups and I was starting to get frustrated with it.

    Laura Dern does a good job as a wacky person who just can't see past herself. She's her own worst enemy, choosing to ignore what's right in front of her face, deal with her predicament and move on and do something about it. I was getting fed up of seeing her continually go back to her old floor and try to confide in Krista, one of two characters (besides Janice) whom I found two faced and really despised.

    Thankfully, the last episode sort of made up for most of the series and I'm interested in seeing where Amy goes with her new found power. As long as the series gets another shot. Aside from Laura Dern, the whole cast that makes up the Cogentiva floor is well cast and funny, with each person contributing to the weirdness that makes up the DNA of a basement floor worker. Timm Sharp as the politically incorrect, nerdish, loutish, priggish head is very funny. Mike White also deserves a mention because he says a lot more with his quiet demeanour and smile than with any dialogue (but I had to laugh at his hack in password!).

    All in all, I'd recommend it but bear in mind that Amy is highly annoying and frustrating most of the times but there are lucid moments when she gets the picture and you think there is hope for her after all.
  • Very surprised by show's rating, gave it 10 to even score a bit. Lucky HBO did broadcasting it, otherwise based on IMDb rating shall had never watch it.

    This show starts slow, and, as others have written, a bit confusing, not knowing what bread it is. But it grows in me by each episode, becoming addictive by having an unique mix of creativity, human nature sincere exposure, and lot of common sense. Very much liked the non-intrusive way of telling a story of a personality which, although is not of my taste at all, manages to make me sympathize with, and perhaps understand and accept.

    Well done.
  • manbok2110 November 2014
    10/10
    Mirror.
    I use IMDb on a regular basis just for reading reviews, although I always felt compelled to write my own reviews, it was not enough as most other people already have said, what i would have said.

    For this specific title, I had to write something.

    First of all, the show has been canceled this year and I'm glad. Season 2 final leaves a great ending point and I highly doubt a 3rd or 4th season could have topped it. Sometimes it is better to leave a little bit open for speculation, but not too open, so that people get satisfaction of a well rounded ending. It is perfect.

    Why did I title this review "mirror"? Well, this series exposes and shows the truth about human nature and social interaction. About life. While watching it, sometimes I found it almost unbearable (like a car crash that you can't watch, but can't look away), because it was too true, showing the ugly reality. I'm fairly sure, many, many people can relate to some degree, or 100% degree to the characters in this show. All the traits and natures of us humans are shown from hypocrisy to forgiveness, love, hate, hopes, dreams, imagination and clash with real world, disappointment, resentment, regret, success, happiness and so on.

    Right, so you think you might have seen it all before? Not quite.

    It's not only the exposure of human nature, but we are constantly kept on our heels through this series, as happiness doesn't mean happy. Success doesn't mean successful. It plays with your mind and shows the viewer his/her own imperfections. How we judge and assume, how we guess and conclude.

    It works so well from episode one. It could be something you disregard, but if you stick around, the well written script and the extra ordinary acting by all individuals involved will grab you.
  • Each time I watch an episode of Enlightened I am blown away by the nuance, complexity and profound truths of this show. It works for me on every level. There is no other show on television that succeeds for me in the way it does-- making me cry and laugh, never saccharine but always sincere. The writing is uniformly superlative, supported by killer performances, direction and excellence in all other aspects of the show.

    I will be truly mortified if it isn't picked up for another season. We need this type of show. It shows us where we are as a society and, like Amy, offers us hope and a potential direction we can go in. If we choose to. I think we need to choose to and I sure hope HBO does too.
  • Just been watching this new HBO series "Enlightened" and I must say it's an interesting and raw work from Mike White he shows how life can be depressing and dark with rage and anger. It's clear that most people can relate to this thru their jobs and paying bills, and dealing with relationships as all of this brings stress and uncertainty to most. All of this is showcased thru the life of one middle aged lady Amy(the wonderful Laura Dern(who shares a birthday the same day as me!)she's a woman who's had a nervous and spiritual breakdown.

    And Amy is faced with a destructive type of life it all began when she split from her ex husband(Luke Wilson)who's battled his demon with drugs. Also to complicate matters life on the job sucks as after 15 years she's been demoted to a lower level computer programming job in the basement of the company! As she watched how others have slimmed, lied, and slept their way up the ladder. As Amy's mind feels the rage and anger toward her co workers anytime she has thoughts of them.

    Not all is lost still Amy is a productive citizen who still fights for joy and peace by trying to do the right thing by looking out for others and her character always tries to do things for humanity. She gets much advice and support from her mother(Diane Ladd who's Laura's real life mother) who she lives with. Overall this is a series that's a little dark with drama and blended well with anger and sadness as it proves life is always uncertain with a challenge ahead. Still the lead character Amy fights for what's right and to be at peace with life and people in a spiritual manner. Overall good interesting new series.
  • LeonLouisRicci15 December 2012
    While watching you will probably feel as frustrated and angry as Amy (Laura Dern) in this made for cable series. Because she is not the easiest character to warm up to and you may feel like shaking some sense into her overbearing and neurotic behavior. That is the point in this rather risky show.

    The first season of half-hour episodes is a good effort that is an emotional roller-coaster of angst and dark comedy.

    It may be too sharp and rough going for mass appeal, but it does have that edge for viewers of this type of social commentary and could be regarded as a cry-out to those square pegs trying to make sense of those round holes. The villain here is mostly corporate greed and impunity. It is a David and Goliath story and one cannot help but be on the side of the underdog.

    The series is populated with interesting offbeat characters and the dysfunction comes from all sides. In Season One There is very little resolution and it has set up a fight to the finish with a very flawed character putting on the gloves and taking on a "Champion" and the odds are heavily against. In Season Two it will have a difficult decision whether to have an upset and crown a new "Crusader Champ", or not. Place your bets.
  • GlassHandle30 December 2011
    Warning: Spoilers
    This is one of the best shows I have ever seen on Television. Mike White's writing is hilarious, heartfelt, depressing and the most truly enlightening pieces of art ever shown on television. This show is a masterpiece. Laura Derns "Amy" is a truly multifaceted creation. It's easy to to slap the term "crazy" on her and I don't believe she is crazy at all. She is a manifestation of the way many people feel in today's world. Helpless, confused, yearning for love and the meaning of it all. Amy especially wants to be good and do good in the world. To contribute in a positive way to give her own life meaning. It is very hard to engage real change in the world today especially when money rules all even at a time where climate change and economic breakdown shows that change is badly needed most companies will continue to chase the almighty dollar while facing certain doom in not too many years to come. I also think many people will think of Amy as crazy because she dares to yearn for change and is not above it to actually attempt to do something about it (whether its wrong headed or not is not the question here) One of the most amazing things about the show is that we hear Amys thoughts which many times may seem delusional but at the same time make total sense. She truly wants good things for everybody and the world. She single-mindedly wants to achieve change in herself and everything and everyone around her. Its a heartbreaking show that is often very funny and very dark. We should all be like Amy but we don't have the guts so we laugh at her and call her crazy. But who is the truly crazy one?
  • I'm copying and pasting my review for S.2 finale. But I'd like to add this show has to be given a chance. It grows on you like The Wire. Admittedly it's tough to do in a brief 1/2 hour, but that would be one of my few criticisms where this show has taken me. Here's my S.2 episode finale thoughts.

    First of all Mike White, I'm a man and I love to watch shows about women. And of course, IT'S NOT just about women. Second of all, and more importantly, BRAVO dude for your insightful, satisfying and very moving season finale. I SURE HOPE THERE'S A SEASON 3.

    This show just keeps getting better and better. Timely, brave, pertinent, and yes, utterly entertaining. What you and Laura Dern have done, IMO, is nothing less than a modern day miracle. You make me feel, care, root and applaud your characters and your story. How often can we truly say that? The acting, the story, the tone, right down to each characters demeanor and interactions. Nice! PLEASE HBO, renew this wonderful, satisfying, entertaining adult drama.
  • This woman is just like a person i use to know.She will get under your skin and make you instantly annoyed.She always talks about herself and her issues- never listening to the person she is talking to.She talks about helping others not realizing that she needs help herself.

    You know the acting is good in this show by how irritate you get when you watch her on TV.

    The funny thing is that there are clueless people just like that in the real world.It is defiantly an original show i will give it that. You really can't predict it. I think Laura Dern has done it all after this part.
  • The acting is phenomenal and so is the writing. This series takes a look at what we consider normal, and it also looks at what hurts and heals. It is funny, dramatic, and honest. This is the best show I've seen in a long time. Also one of the most honest in regard to what it means to be a part of the capitalist machine. So damn good.
  • If you're into subtle, sometimes dark humour with a twist of quirk, you'll get a kick out of this one.

    I watched Season 1 & 2 back to back so its fair to say I was addicted. The episodes are short, yet packed with enough substance that you'll be left wanting more.

    Dern's character is likable just not to anyone she knows. After suffering a breakdown, she returns to her life with higher hopes of - everything. Don't we all wish for a better world? What I like about Dern's character is that she has good intentions. She's just completely misunderstood by everyone around her and is dismissed as a neurotic maniac with no sense of self awareness.

    She desperately wants to find a purpose in life but eventually makes 'good' with what she's got and.. its interesting enough.

    The character development is well written and does a good job to explore the complexity of human relationships. There's unexpected humour and awkwardness and ultimately I felt myself rooting for Dern to 'stick it to the big guys!

    Its kind of like 30 Rock had a baby with Weeds that was raised by Broad City. Highly recommended.
  • I just clicked on this for lack of better looking choices on Amazon Instant and ended up binge watching all of the 2 seasons. It's so well done, with the writing, the acting, the story, the cinematography, the creative parts. I love this show. Laura Dern and think she is a very under- appreciated actress. She is great in this show. To see that she's the executive producer makes me respect her even more. There are so many story lines to follow as well and they play it all out in a very smart way. The flash backs and the little reveals of each character's story is done really well. I feel like this show could go on and on for many seasons and still be very good. I'm not quite sure why this show isn't just as popular as Mad Men. Maybe since it's on HBO and many people don't subscribe to HBO. I feel like if this show was made into a Netflix Original it would be wildly popular like House of Cards. I feel it's just as enjoyable to watch as both of the previous very popular shows I mentioned.
  • Its about a 40yr old woman. She is not very smart, but she thinks she is, she wants to do great things, but she can't because she can't really understand why things are repeatedly going wrong around her (though we the audience can see). And most of the time its because of her dumb actions, and she just can't see it right then.

    She is having a mid life crisis and she is trying her very best to live.

    I have now seen till s1e6. Each episode focuses on a different story and there is a sort of moral at the end of it. The beauty of it is that its not condescending or trying to push it down our throat. Its always trying to give us both sides of the picture.

    If you are giving it a try, please try it for a few episodes. I too was not convinced in the beginning few episodes, but now I have grown into it.

    Its just 21mins long but there is a continuous tension in the story. There is nothing dangerous/thriller like happening, yet it is! The writing and direction should be applauded.

    For now I give it a 8/10.

    Though I think it deserves more, as it makes me think and look at myself, and how many shows have that ability??

    Give it a spin and tell us you what you think.

    Cheers :-).............
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I cant tell whether they are making fun of people who become enlightened or if they feel they can enlighten the world stemming from what seems to be a fairly vapid self-help seminar. "They" in this review refers to Mike White and Laura Dern who have their hands all over this new comedy/drama in fields of creation, production, directing, writing and performing. Maybe with less cooks in the kitchen the show has more focus and self-control, but that focus isn't apparent to this reviewer yet. Maybe they are pointing out the futility of change or perhaps how jaded and impersonal the world around them has become. The message is unclear, as I have no idea whether to root for our leading lady or hit some sense into her with a polo mallet. The show is fresh and unique, and its great to see Dern on the screen, aging but still looking good, I guess the mid 40's IS the new mid-30's as her hair and clothing style reflect the latter. I have always appreciated her skills, and its good to see her stretch out in this one,but by the end of this 30 minute episode I was already getting both bored and annoyed as the show is already getting a bit preachy and a lot pretentious. Once again, the men are written as jerks as one is a numb corporate type who cheats and the other a drug addict.Even with that, I will watch more episodes to see if the show manages to gain focus, entertain, and cease the self- important message.
  • I must say that I was amazed of the quality of this show, the great actors, dialogs and script overall. To be honest, it is the first time I felt like not watching a TV show, but actually living it.

    Amy is a middle aged woman, trying to find herself after various failures : with work, partner, family... she's trying to do the right thing, to change though being the same in many ways.

    This show is very similar to what many people must have lived : looking for some kind of redemption. No matter what is your job, no matter your religion, sex, or financial situation. Many try to do better, to be better.

    Finally, Amy reminds us something important : that to live is not only about doing things, but also thinking about them.

    Outstanding Show.
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