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  • (Read the full review at nickplusmovies.blogspot.com)

    Jean-Marc Vallée returns to his beloved Québécois roots with his latest work, "Café de flore", one of the many films that screened at TIFF back in September (and that I was lucky enough to see). The story is composed of two interwoven narratives that-- only at first glance-- seem completely unrelated to one another.

    The first story is set in present-day Montreal and centers on a recently divorced father of two girls, Antoine Godin (Kevin Parent), who leads a successful life as a professional DJ. Despite having found true happiness in his relationship with his girlfriend Rose (Evelyne Brochu), he feels a little remorseful for having left his ex-wife Carole (Hélène Florent), for whom he still cares deeply. Antoine understands that she continues struggling to move on with her life, heartbroken. And to make the situation in which they find themselves even more difficult, their eldest daughter persistently plays their nostalgic love song with hopes of reuniting her parents.

    The second story is set in Paris in 1969 and focuses on Jacqueline (Vanessa Paradis), a self-sufficient, loving single mother who becomes the embodiment of perseverance and selflessness as she promises to devote herself both physically and spiritually to her son Laurent, who has been diagnosed with Down syndrome. She spends every minute of spare time with her beloved young boy with the goal to elongate his limited life expectancy. One day, when Laurent begins to be infatuated by Véronique, a new girl in his class-- who, incidentally, also has Down syndrome-- Jacqueline is struck by an overwhelming feeling as she fears that her inseparable bond with the only person she loves will be be lost with time.

    Up until the very end of the film, it seems like the only link between both stories is the music the characters listen to (the jazz album "Café de flore" appears in the second story while a certain remix is featured in the first one), but as we progress further into this mystical mystery, we learn that there is something much deeper tying together the characters and their stories of love and loss.

    Knowing that "Café de flore" would be composed of intertwined stories, I was initially a little reluctant to seeing it and very worried that its structure would collapse within the first few minutes of the film. To my pleasant surprise, this modern approach to storytelling proved to be ultimately rewarding. I believe credit is due to the film editor, who is-- believe it or not-- Jean-Marc Vallée, again. It's nice to hear that he had control of almost every visual aspect of his own work of art. With Vallée's perfectly orchestrated editing, the audience is able to follow the story without ever sensing an abrupt switch between story lines. In the film's entirety, not once did I feel that some scenes were fragmented or disjointed from others. Vallée always progresses deeper into his creation by carefully and seamlessly shifting between narratives just at the right time, creating a smooth, fluid tempo. Briefly, everything flows like a river.

    Just like in "C.R.A.Z.Y.", music is a vital element to this film. Jean- Marc Vallée selects many tunes with ethereal, ambient qualities to match the profound thoughts and feelings of all the characters. While he features some more Pink Floyd ("Speak to Me/Breathe"), he makes of Sigur Ros's "Svefn-g-englar" the film's most haunting musical piece-- by far.

    There are far too many impressive performances in "Café de flore" to name. Vallée must be what one would call an "actor's director", because he seems to continuously squeeze out the most confident, natural performances from all of his actors-- young or old-- in order to achieve his goal to craft a realistic family drama. He even went to the lengths of finding two children who have Down syndrome in real life for the roles of Laurent and Véronique (these are two "performances" that will make your jaw drop). This is proof of his everlasting adherence to realism as a filmmaker.

    In sum, "Café de flore" is a sensual, deeply touching chef-d'oeuvre that will have you shivering every minute in pure emotional awe. It never comes across as overly sentimental, but rather genuinely heartfelt. I can't recall the last time I found myself on the verge of tears while simultaneously smiling at the bittersweet beauty of a film. Come to think of it, there isn't a single movie from 2011 that I could recommend seeing more than this one. I believe it's an essential viewing for anyone who has felt the most fundamental of human emotions. (That means you... I hope)
  • Firstly, disregard the two previous reviews, for they are both negative and underrate a great film. 'Cafe de Flore' is not quite for everyone, which I can understand. However if you truly want to see this film, ignore other opinions, otherwise you will miss out on a potential Oscar nomination.

    There are two separate stories occurring. One is about a woman in the 1960s (Paradis) who has to raise her son on her own, because he has Down's syndrome. The other is about a music jockey named Antoine (Parent) who is ready to marry again despite the bond he shares with his ex-wife, who was also his first love. His eldest daughter purposely plays certain songs which remind him of their marriage, since the central idea is how music recalls certain memories. Every time a certain song is heard in the background, one is bound to step inside the characters memories.

    The other story is the beauty of a mother-son relationship. Paradis is genuine in this role, especially being a real-life mother herself. Her makeup ages her to portray her role well. We see how she encourages her boy to learn despite his disabilities. Remember, this was an era where children like him were discriminated and often sent to institutions.

    'Cafe de Flore' is truly a story about the power of love. You have to follow closely, therefore if easily distracted the flashbacks may confuse you. The constant repetition of Pink Floyd, which was also a signature band for Jean-Marc Vallee's 'C.R.A.Z.Y.', is synchronized to perfection. The visuals and acting performances are moving, as the film unfolds by layer, to at last reveal how both stories are connected.
  • "If you love something, let it go. If it comes back to you, it's yours forever. If it doesn't, it wasn't meant to be." – Anonymous

    Love is about holding on to someone, but it is also about knowing when to let go. This theme defines Jean-Marc Vallée's Café de flore, his second film since the 2005 hit C.R.A.Z.Y., and one of the most poignant films in recent memory. Not only does Café de flore repeat Vallée's earlier success, but goes far beyond it in its extraordinary ability to capture the intensity of deeply-felt human emotion. The title refers not to the famous Paris café, but to a jazzy song with the same name that serves as a connection between each of the film's two parallel stories. In addition to the title song, music plays a large role in the film as it did in C.R.A.Z.Y. with songs from Pink Floyd, Sigur Rós, and The Cure supporting key points in the narrative.

    Unfolding with a non-linear script that includes multiple flashbacks, flash-forwards, and cross-cutting, the stories take place in two time periods over forty years apart. In the present day, Antoine (Kevin Parent) is a well-to-do middle-aged disc jockey who lives in a suburban home with his partner Rose (Evelyne Brochu) and his two daughters from a former marriage (Joanny Corbeil-Picher, Rosalie Fortier). Everything looks wonderful on the surface except that Antoine is visiting a psychiatrist to handle his feelings about what he feels is betrayal of his family. Antoine's first wife Carole (Hélène Florent) is distraught and yearns for reconciliation with the man she has always thought of as her soul mate since they came together as teenagers out of a shared love of music.

    Carole is urged by friends to let go of Antoine and move on, but she is obsessed with getting him back, telling her friend, "I've never kissed another man." She takes drugs to help her sleep, sleepwalks in the middle of the night, and has dreams and waking visions of a strange woman in Paris many years ago experiencing a similar pain in her relationship. To help her understand her visions, Carole visits a spiritual adviser who tells her that her dreams are not a coincidence. The parallel story is set in Paris in 1969, Jacqueline (Vanessa Paradis), a single mother cares for her young son Laurent (Lucas Bonin) who was born with Down's syndrome. She was abandoned by her husband after Laurent's birth because he did not want to be a "missionary."

    Jacqueline is a devoted mother, showering her son with love, and intending to ensure that he lives past the norm of twenty-five years for a person with his condition. When she enrolls him in a normal school, she constantly protects him from bullies and also from teachers who are not willing or able to deal with him. Jacqueline wants to train Laurent to defend himself by learning how to box but, when he rebels at the idea, she teaches him to strike back through words which he uses to peak efficiency at the right moment.

    When Laurent is seven, he develops a close attachment to Veronique, another Down's syndrome child, an attachment that threatens his mother's obsessive protection and leads to an unforeseen turn in their relationship. Café de flore is a passionately performed and spiritually resonant film, one of the best I've seen this year. Reminiscent of Terence Malick's Tree of Life with its voice-overs reflecting the inner thoughts of the characters, it is a haunting experience and the mystical connection between its two stories will keep you in a Donnie Darko-like state of puzzlement long into the night and beyond.
  • If you can make the leap of faith required in the final portion of the movie, this is a beautiful, haunting work that will stay with you long after you have left the theater. There is no question that this movie asks a lot of one's suspension of disbelief. But I think that movie goers should give it the benefit of a doubt. This is a very unconventional love story, and it may be the most thoughtful movie every made about the idea that one person can be another person's soul mate. The tension of course arises when what does one do when one finds a deeper, more meaningful soul mate. This is a complex work with a totally different way of investigating its romantic themes. It uses music beautifully as a thread that joins elements of the film together, binding emotional themes together and providing transitions between the two stories that it tells. I can't think of another movie that finds such an unique approach to telling its tale.It is also the best Canadian film that I have seen in years. One of the very best movies of the year.
  • All i can say is that I loved this film. Just saw it last night. it's a challenging, intriguing, mesmerizing, intoxicating look at love through two intertwined, overlapping stories -- set in past and present and both in different time periods -- about a man going through a divorce and the mother of a down's syndrome child. You can't explain it. You have to experience it. And whether you believe in past lives or not (i don't and the director says he doesn't either), you will go on an unsettling emotional journey watching this visually stunning, amazingly acted movie. Vanessa Paradis is heartbreaking and almost unrecognizable. The addictive Cafe de Flore music inspired the director to write, direct and edit this film himself. The score is modern, mind-blowing but also includes some classic rock, including some from Pink Floyd.
  • I scared myself when I cried with the Sigur Ros song in the film, out of blue, in the dark cinema with only 3 other strange people there.

    This is a film about dream and love, and what are you supposed to do if your dream is all about the one you love, and what if you spend all your life protecting a dream that never meant to belong to you. This is the question in front of Jacqueline and Carole. After all, having a dream that connected to human beings is a dangerous thing to do.

    Using two parallel story lines is no more a novelty in film making. Yet the film does not give us much information on the relation between the two very different stories—a single mother, Jacqueline, with her Down's syndrome son, Laurent, in 1960s and a couple (Carole and Antonio) facing betrayal and the sequential mental stress today. The only correlations between them are Carole's strange dreams and "Cafe de Flore"—the songs with the same name that people from two spaces and times happened to play. Two and a half hours is a long duration for an independent art film, and in most of the time, these two stories are separately told, slowly and beautifully, and I thought maybe that's it, there would be no overlap between the two stories, until Carole figured out her connection with the mother and son from the last life.

    I watched Cafe de Flore by myself in a small cinema in the suburb of London. Tranquillity is all you need when encountering a beautiful film like this. Crying like a baby in the cinema, I had to sit there for a while until the film credits finished in order to give myself some time to look normal before going out. And the film is such a great comfort for some reason, it's cathartic.

    The original soundtrack is another important reason to make the film so moving. Interestingly, Sigur Ros's music video svefn-g-englar featured with Down's syndrome dancers, could be the initial inspiration of Cafe de Flore?
  • IMHO there are two categories of movies: the ones that impress me when I see it, like Hollywood blockbusters which shock me with stunning visual effects, or action scenes, or dramas. There is another category, that don't produce much of an impression when I see it, I get even bored wondering myself why did I pay the ticket for it. But.. suddenly after a couple of hours, or days, they become alive inside me and haunt me after. "Cafe De Flore" is one of those! It doesn't have a story to tell, it is pure art. The authors plant a seed that is intended to grow inside the viewer. It doesn't try to convince you of anything, doesn't draw a conclusion in the end, just places frame after frame and leave the interpretation to you. I would rate it 8 out of 10. regards, Andrei
  • Amazing. Amazing. Amazing. I usually dislike indie films and their lack of plot (Las Acacias) or often, even endings.

    This was a real movie, about real emotions, and really imperfect individuals. Beautiful energy as added with the music, the emotions were aptly and strongly felt with its aid.

    The subplot of past lives makes one wonder whether or not one believes in it, and if so how much? Just breathtaking. Even if you don't love it as much as I do, it is a worthy film worth viewing and giving an open hearted chance to. Who knows? You might be moved, you hard nosed cynicist, you :)
  • This film is visually beautiful, the acting superb. However, I don't recommend it. The "mystical" connection between the two story lines absolutely does not work. The story line with Jacqueline is touching, and occupies far too little of the screen time. Vanessa Paradis is amazing, and her interactions with her son are touching and sad, as you recognize her life revolves completely around him as see struggles to raise him alone after his father leaves. On the other hand, I found the misogynistic tale of Antoine very off-putting. A narcissistic man leaves his beautiful, intelligent wife of 20 years for a vapid, tattooed, insecure younger woman with whom he appears to have no common interest other than sex. How original. Great role model he is for his teenage daughter, who hates him, by the way. Big surprise. Unfortunately, the daughter is the only female who stands up to him and calls him out for the cochon that he is. The other women in his life are just waiting with bated breath to see whether he chooses to allow them to continue making him the center of their worlds. I am really tired of this story line having seen it too many times, and I didn't enjoy this film as a result.
  • anse_200127 February 2012
    This film is simply beautiful.

    It's not complicated. It is simply a movie about love. The images are beautiful and the actors are beautiful. The story line is just there to weave from one example of love to another. It (the movie) caresses many facets and types of love.

    I stopped trying to understand what anything meant about 5 minute into the movie. I just went along for the ride. I found the movie touching - a good reminder of what life is all about.

    I highly recommend it. It's a great way to pass a few hours in the presence of beautiful emotions and images.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Café de Flore is one impeccably crafted and shockingly overwhelming movie. I think it's pretty much like The Tree Of Life, but probably easier to see and understand, although equally cosmic and delicate.

    We'll probably never know if Valée wanted us to believe Jacqueline's story is all in Carole's head or if both stories really merge and soulmates are meant to travel through time and space (I would say by the Notre Dame shot that medium told Carole the truth!). The beauty here is all about the connective tissue who intertwins the two multilayered story lines, the power of music, the rawness and intensity of feelings in dreams and learning to let go.

    I was on the verge of tears a couple of times... and surely will watch it again pretty soon.
  • ismail_02620 January 2014
    The first story is set in present-day Montreal and centers on a recently divorced father of two girls, Antoine Godin (Kevin Parent), who leads a successful life as a professional DJ. Despite having found true happiness in his relationship with his girlfriend Rose (Evelyne Brochu), he feels a little remorseful for having left his ex-wife Carole (Hélène Florent), for whom he still cares deeply. Antoine understands that she continues struggling to move on with her life, heartbroken. And to make the situation in which they find themselves even more difficult, their eldest daughter persistently plays their nostalgic love song with hopes of reuniting her parents.

    The second story is set in Paris in 1969 and focuses on Jacqueline (Vanessa Paradis), a self-sufficient, loving single mother who becomes the embodiment of perseverance and selflessness as she promises to devote herself both physically and spiritually to her son Laurent, who has been diagnosed with Down syndrome. She spends every minute of spare time with her beloved young boy with the goal to elongate his limited life expectancy. One day, when Laurent begins to be infatuated by Véronique, a new girl in his class-- who, incidentally, also has Down syndrome-- Jacqueline is struck by an overwhelming feeling as she fears that her inseparable bond with the only person she loves will be be lost with time.

    Up until the very end of the film, it seems like the only link between both stories is the music the characters listen to (the jazz album "Café de flore" appears in the second story while a certain remix is featured in the first one), but as we progress further into this mystical mystery, we learn that there is something much deeper tying together the characters and their stories of love and loss.

    Knowing that "Café de flore" would be composed of intertwined stories, I was initially a little reluctant to seeing it and very worried that its structure would collapse within the first few minutes of the film. To my pleasant surprise, this modern approach to storytelling proved to be ultimately rewarding. I believe credit is due to the film editor, who is-- believe it or not-- Jean-Marc Vallée, again. It's nice to hear that he had control of almost every visual aspect of his own work of art. With Vallée's perfectly orchestrated editing, the audience is able to follow the story without ever sensing an abrupt switch between story lines. In the film's entirety, not once did I feel that some scenes were fragmented or disjointed from others. Vallée always progresses deeper into his creation by carefully and seamlessly shifting between narratives just at the right time, creating a smooth, fluid tempo. Briefly, everything flows like a river.
  • Cafe de Flore proposes two somewhat strange parallel story lines, that of a single mother of a Down's Syndrome boy in 1960's Paris, alongside that of a narcissistic professional DJ living in modern day Montreal, Canada. Throughout the film I expected these two disparate stories to somehow meet in some tangible form, but this part of the film remains a bit of a mystery... perhaps staying in some kind of spiritual realm. That aspect of the film is somewhat confusing, and may be a bit off-putting to many viewers. I thought it a bit strange, but overall I think this is a great film. Even though this parallel story line is pretty bizarre, the filming, especially the Paris scenes, are superb, the acting is great, and the connection between mother and son is incredible. I thought the character of the young Down's syndrome girl could have been fleshed out a bit more, but apart from that its a very watchable film with great music and well crafted performances. Nice work.
  • I must take issue with previous reviewers here. I am a generous soul but I set high standards for my movies. I must say this was not good. Indulgent, yes, good, no! Very disappointed with a movie that promised much. A superb cast, acted really well but an uncoordinated narrative that looked as if it had been decided upon afterwards in the editing or cutting room. The supposedly intertwining stories had no relevance at all to each other despite the efforts of the director with his puerile attempt to bring them together. Indulgent and pretentious. With very little merit. Beautifully filmed visually and good sound quality but other than that a total waste of his time and more importantly, ours!
  • Café de Flore- Catch It (A-) Café de Floreis a beautiful French movie about LOVE. Its rarely you see a movie about Love & Soul Mates these days so Cafe De Flore is completely refreshing in bringing the purity of love. Café de Flore is a love story about people separated by time and place but connected in profound and mysterious ways. Atmospheric, fantastical, tragic and hopeful, the film chronicles the parallel fates of Jacqueline, a young mother with a disabled son in 1960s Paris, and Antoine, a recently divorced, successful DJ in present day Montreal. What binds the two stories together is love - euphoric, obsessive, tragic, youthful, timeless love.

    Even though the movie runs in Non-Chronological manner still you would appreciate how it amalgamates two stories beautifully. I'm not huge fan of non-chronological movie because it makes you depressive like Burning Man, We Need to Talk about Kevin & Memento off course.

    Vanessa Paradis gave a brilliant performance, she lived in that moment and her chemistry with the syndrome child is superb. You completely forget that it's not even real. Kevin Parent is mesmerizing and exudes passion. Can't believe that's his first outing as an actor. Evelyne Broche is beautiful & her chemistry with Kevin Parent is amazing. Helene Florent is great along with syndrome kids Marin Gerrier & Alice Dubois.

    On the whole, Cafe De Flore is a beautiful heartening movie, which will bring you in tears.
  • This deeply moving and captivating story caught my attention immediately and leaves me in a state of deep contemplation each time I see it. I've watched it carefully about 6 or 7 times now and every time I catch more detail and nuance. It is full of meaning on so many levels. I can deeply relate to the characters in the story personally, especially the wife, and the artful use of music, emotion, familial relationships, and deep loyalties and care between the characters is flawless and impeccable. I typically have a very short attention span for most movies, but the raw, unadorned, unapologetic delivery of these entwined, parallel stories was pulled together beautifully with excellent choices in music and perfect acting. It's one of my favorite films. I felt dismayed by other negative reviews because I think people are used to having storylines spelled out for them, and this one actually makes you think. Highly sophisticated and intelligent film. Riveting. It gets directly to the heart of the matter of fate and the mysterious truth of soul relationships.
  • As cheesy as the review of my title sounds, i can assure you it is not. This movie for me personally was a spiritual masterpiece, a mesmerizing and yet mind blowing journey into the very depths of the human soul. This is an absolute must watch movie, for anyone who yet still dares to believe that true love exists, and it's strong enough to bypass all human limited boundaries even after death. I will not spoil this film, however if you are a spiritual seeker, a sensitive person with emphatic abilities, a true dreamer who believes that love is the only way, than i urge you to watch this movie, not with an open mind but an open heart, as the mind will not be able to comprehend anything that this movie tries to transmit. Besides all this, the music is also a perfect choice in the movie, carefully chosen to transmit the message of love and empathy to those souls who are ready to absorb it. As for the actors in the movie, i haven't been able to find one single flaw. The movie is perfectly executed in every way, the actors were simply all amazing, the music is sublime and overall this movie is a beautiful journey into the matters of the heart.
  • itsmecitra23 March 2012
    this is amazingly beautiful movie. The plot, cinematography, editing are so amazing.

    This movie is also successfully influence me about the message; connection between past and present life. well, it depends on everyone's belief but through this movie it made me think again about life. And wondering what my past life looked like with the way i am right now. Very great idea of story.

    what i like about the story the most is, it wasn't predictable. so this movie made me just sit, silence, and watch until the end.

    Seriously, this is a must see movie!!!! This won't waste your time
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Everything went right in this movie. An absolute art piece of acting, directing & production. The story, common. They used two trivial real life examples and made it sound like beauty. Pure touching beauty, that we keep to ourselves everyday. The pain that we ignore in it everyday. It wakes us up to the real meaning of love, marriage, relationships, signs, God. It explains the meaning of existence through a different set of characters always connected- like we all are. At the end, it makes you wish to go back in time and chose your life all over again, differently. And then, as you can't, it makes you accept life, as what it is meant to be will be.

    Not sure if the entire audience will appreciate the "soulmate" concept explored in it but doubt this amazing film will get bad reviews. The soundtrack, camera, actors made it impossible despite the message in it.
  • For the first third of the film, I kind of enjoyed the part of the story that was set in Paris in the 1960s, and was willing to go along with the modern-day story, even though it wasn't all that convincing. But the modern-day part of the film just kept getting worse as it went along -- unconvincing acting and storyline, and the "spiritual" and "romantic" aspect really came across as the enactment of a middle-aged guy's fantasy of having everything you want, and having everyone love you for essentially being a jerk. I left the theater feeling annoyed and ripped off. It would have been a much better film if the director had stuck with the Paris in the 1960s plot line and developed it better. That part of the film had some real potential, but unfortunately the whole thing didn't add up to a good movie.
  • xcentaurx13 November 2012
    Nowadays there are few films which have ability to provoke thoughts and leave a lasting impression. Cafe de Flore was one movie i was easily going to skip but i forced myself to see the trailer once before cutting the title off my list. The trailer was enough to compel me watch the film and thus i did. Now, i have got to say this is the best movie so far of 2012.

    The movie is a revelation by all means, it's something we haven't seen before and to experience such a quality cinema these days is a rarity. To write too much about the plot would be unfair but it revolves around to parallel stories, one in Paris 1960's about a mother and her mongoloid son and the other in contemporary Montreal about a DJ who give up his first love for another girl.

    The acting in this ensemble drama is a complete standout. The ones which leave a mark are Vanessa Paradis, Kevin Parent and child star Marin Gerrier.

    I would have to praise the director Jean-Marc Vallee for making a film with such innovation in film making. His style and approach is completely different, the movie is in fragments put together. Different characters, periods, ages and subplots all jumbled and the element that binds the movie together is music. Movie uses the music in a best way possible, it transcends the movie high and creates an effect which would be impossible to create without such brilliant use of music.

    I could have given the film 10 but a little improvement towards the ending could have helped make it a masterpiece. I won't write about that. Also a little further development in few characters would have been better.

    I think the movie wouldn't have been of such intensity if it wasn't made in such bizarre manner, it confuses you, gives answers and makes you think. Still i believe the movie won't be praised by everyone, it requires people who like experiencing something unconventional and strange yet plausible. Perfect example of modern movie making and totally unique love story with near perfect impact.
  • now the screenplay, the screenplay writer and the director has provided us with another brand new excuse when you suddenly fall for another man or woman, become an adulterer, abandon what you've already built, a marriage, your faithful wife, your vows, your kids....and blame, self-righteous claim that is karma, an unavoidable fatal attraction to a new person who suddenly appeared in your normal life. a very complicated trans-continental karma like Tibetan's searching for their living Buddah heir. your past life determines your up-to-date life, you have to realize, to cash in, to embrace it. there's no excuse, no escape, no whatsoever you've done, did and doing in your present life.

    well, this movie will teach you how to have an affair outside your existing marriage and relationship, and how to tell the persons you're gonna ruin that you have to do the unfaithfulness to compensate or redeem, or release the debt, the haunted karma that you have to repay to those who you owed so much in your past life.

    every adultery always got an excuse. 'sorry, i don't love you any more.' is just too lame and too common. you've got to find some new excuses to justify your deeds that might be against all the social or moral standards.

    after viewed this movie, i am so assured that the screenplay writer might have been trying to hint that he, too, also faced such crisis and dilemma. he wished his wife would be like that wife so badly hurt by his unfaithfulness and would find peace by her own and wished she could let go and move on.

    this is a very good movie, but unfortunately, i just can't accept such coward excuse in our real life. asking a 'medium' to give you a 'why' answer is simply absurd. suppose the fate and karma got a twist, it turned out that the woman you fell for was an ugly, older woman, you'd still have to fall for her since it's an inescapable karma that you have to redeem it? karma never promised that your new love would be a handsome man or a younger pretty woman, the spirit might randomly choose any age, any outlook....and what if it turned out to be in the same gender? then, you have to change your sexual preference? give me a break!
  • kardaragon27 September 2011
    An empty shell, beautifully filmed and great music with a story that want's to be great but is unfortunately kind of empty, the casting of the main characters as a younger version of themselves is so weak, that eventually only through strong dialogue did I get that the actors were playing younger versions of the leads... Bad casting... However the leads are great, namely Helene Florent, Vanessa Paradis and Kevin Parent... The story sucks... Beautiful shots but empty of meanings... A great idea, badly executed! And yet I was SO looking forward to it, as I loved Crazy by the same director. This isn't Dr.Zhivago or the English patient at all... I don't know what it is, and I can't believe the good press it's getting! It's even quite a bit pretentious....
  • I am afraid I do not agree with the acclaim this film has received on IDMB. It's just an OK film, which towards the end takes a mystic turn which spoils it entirely for me. Other reviews have mentioned "if you can suspend your disbelief," well I suppose that in the context of this film, I can't. Of course, one could try to refuse the mystic reading, and that would work up to the end credits. In greater detail, I found the contemporary (Canadian) part of the story excellent, believable, interesting, true, engaging and very well told. On the contrary, I found the sixties (Parisienne) part of the story dull and boring, and difficult to believe. All in all, certainly a dignified effort from the director and screenwriters, but a film that I would only recommend half-heartedly.
  • Vincentiu22 December 2012
    not exactly a film. but a mirror. a travel. a map. a touching testimony about people, feelings, search of happiness, errors, expectations. and escapes. beautiful, sad and unique. delicate as paper ash. strong like a spider web. fresh like a winter deep morning. more important - memorable. a puzzle. many colors. more many nuances. gestures, words. as bones of strange - dark - terrible forms of love. its object - axis of a form of personal religion as instrument to fight against world. or skin for a golden circle of appearances. verdict - must see Vanessa Paradis performance in an extraordinary role. must see Café de Flore: like q run out of yourself: like run to yourself. like a therapy session.for discover - and understand - the real form of small things, smells or gestures. must see it !
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