The Sapphires (2012)

PG-13   |    |  Biography, Comedy, Drama


The Sapphires (2012) Poster

It's 1968, and four young, talented Australian Aboriginal girls learn about love, friendship and war when their all-girl group The Sapphires entertain the US troops in Vietnam.


7/10
13,364

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


2 August 2012 | bbewnylorac
7
| Classy, entertaining film
It's easy to be cynical about this film -- yes the plot is a little clunky and some of the lines are cheesy. But it is a hugely enjoyable movie, with lots of good points. The four girl actors are all great and they don't over-play their parts. When the girls arrive in Vietnam you get a sense of how very young and wide-eyed they are, despite their wisecracks. Chris O'Dowd as the Irish manager is hilarious, although he doesn't venture far from his character on Bridesmaids, or TV's IT Crowd -- that is, the bumbling but endearing Irish sweetie. The music and costumes are fantastic and the cinematography is lovely. I loved how Aborigines were portrayed as being strong and loving, and how many Aborigines have white as well as black blood, and struggle to straddle both cultures. The film provides a slightly sanitised, but still worthwhile, picture of an interesting time in Australian, and world, history.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song that the girls sing as children, and that is repeated throughout the film, was originally a gospel hymn about Moses that has been translated into the Yorta Yorta language.


Quotes

Dave: Before we go than, girls when I met you you were doing all country and western thing and that's fine we all make mistakes. But here is what we learn from that mistake. Country and western music is about loss. Soul music is also about loss. But the ...


Goofs

When in Vietnam the girls sing into a Shure Beta 58 microphone, easily spotted by the blue ring around the head of the microphone. The 58a wasn't in use until around 1996.


Crazy Credits

Preceding the end credits is this tribute:

The women who inspired this story are sisters Laurel Robinson and Lois Peeler and their cousins Beverley Briggs and Naomi Mayers.

For over 40 years they have been active community leaders, working tirelessly to improve health and education for Aboriginal people.

Between them, they have 7 children, 10 grand children and 4 great grand children...

and they sing to them every day.


Alternate Versions

The Australian version is slightly different (roughly 3 minutes longer) than the one shown in International Markets. It does not have a title card in the beginning of the movie explaining about the Aborigine people and that the film is based on a real story. On the other hand. several scenes are cut shorter by a few seconds in the International version, and the end title card is also different. While it describes in details what became of each character in real life, showing pictures of each of them individually, the Australian one briefly sums up their achievements as a whole. There's a final picture of the ladies as they look-like nowadays (shown in black and white in the International version and in color on the Australian one).


Soundtracks

Shouting Out Love
Written by
Carl Smith (as Smith) and Lieutenant Wilkes (as Wilks)
Published by Irving Music, Inc.
Licensed by Universal Music Publishing Group Pty Limited
Performed by The Emotions
Courtesy of Concord Music Group, Inc.
Licensed courtesy of Universal Music Australia Pty Limited

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Biography | Comedy | Drama | Music | Romance

Details

Release Date:

9 August 2012

Language

English, Aboriginal


Country of Origin

Australia

Filming Locations

Albury, New South Wales, Australia

Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$38,372 24 March 2013

Gross USA:

$2,450,867

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$20,423,628

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