User Reviews (42)

  • rchoyle31 May 2013
    So glad I didn't listen to most of the reviews!'
    Before I watched this movie, I read some reviews and was on the fence about watching it as most of the reviews were not overly positive, average at best. Well boy are they all wrong IMO!' This movie was such an amazing movie about one night in the life of a bunch of people attending their 10 year high school reunion. Most of us can relate to a lot of the scenes in the movie which makes the movie that much better. I think it was really well written, well acted and offered everything you can ask for. I won't get into too much detail in what the movie is about, but I can tell you that as I began watching it, it did a really great job in slowly reeling me in and about a quarter of the way through, had me hooked to the end! Brilliant little flick and it had a great e ding I might add. Do yourself a favour, don't pay attention to the naysayers and give this movie a chance, you will enjoy it!
  • Applesnacks13 September 2011
    Not exactly reinventing the wheel, but worth watching.
    In his directorial debut "Ten Year", Jamie Linden (writer/producer of "We Are Marshall") introduces us to an extensive cast of characters as they make preparations to attend Howell Secondary School's Ten Year reunion. The film opens with a light and humorous air, as we meet the usual suspects in a film about life post-highschool: The grown up jock (Chris Pratt) who hopes to make amends for swirlies of the past; the nerd who broke out of his shell (Justin Long), made it big in the real world, and plans to conquer women who once spurned him; the rockstar (Oscar Isaac) who never really found happiness in fame; and of course, the one that got away (Rosario Dawson). There are a litany of supporting characters, most of whom contribute not only to making the film genuinely hilarious, but also support the bigger themes at play in a big way.

    The film is largely predictable, and the characters all feel like they fit nicely into role's that have been hashed out in films of the past. A film like this lives or dies based on the strength of the script and the actors that bring it to the screen. Thankfully, the performances given by the substantial cast breathe life into the film, and for the most part we're laughing and crying right along with them.

    Ultimately, despite being a little tired and predictable, Ten Year feels like a high-school reunion for the cast of a John Hughes movie. If you loved John Hughes' seminal high-school coming-of-age flicks, you should do well with Ten Year - a film aiming to remind us that coming-of-age continues well after graduation.
  • aldri-feb9 July 2013
    Sweet and memorable reunion movie
    '10 Years' is all about reunion of high school class to celebrate their 10 years graduation from school. At first the film shows normally high school reunion should be and seems nothing special from it. It's like watching daily people do at their reunion party like telling how have changed they are, what they've earned in life and introducing their husband or wife to old friends. But the movie flows smoothly and definitely doesn't try to be dumb or ridiculous like 'American Reunion' did. They make audience interested to see it until the best part at climax of the movie. It ends with a sweet and wonderful way which makes this movie so special. Overall, '10 Years' is not just an ordinary drama movie about people's reunion. Inside it there is a compelling story and Jamie Linden as director just put the ending in the right place. Also the characters here have same portion and not focus in only one or two main problems. For me, '10 Years' is great and could be one of the most remarkable romantic comedy movie in recent memory.
  • estebangonzalez1014 December 2012
    It might not be a genre defining film, but it is good
    ¨Now the party can start!¨

    The film is about a 10 year High School reunion, and I know that the formula seems repeated and overdone but this film felt fresh and original. The cast is great and they all share a good amount of screen time. This film manages to deal with all the separate stories and characters much better than other high budget films tried to (Valentine's Day and New Year's Eve). I was interested in the different relationships between these characters and was hooked from the beginning. I thought Channing Tatum would be the lead character and that the story would focus around him, but it actually doesn't; everyone gets a decent amount of screen time. There is no side story here, all the stories are equally relevant and have sufficient time to find some sort of closure. 10 Years was written and directed by Jamie Linden and this was his first film as a director. He had written the screenplays for Dear John and We Are Marshall. Here he gets to work with Tatum once again, but my favorite performance from this movie came from Oscar Isaac, who I really liked in Drive. Drive was my favorite movie from 2011, and despite the fact that Ryan Gosling carried that movie; I thought Isaac was absolutely perfect in his role as well. The chemistry he shares here with Kate Mara is amazing, and the song he performs at the karaoke bar was one of the highlights of the movie. 10 Years is not a laugh out comedy, but it has it's funny moments. I felt like it worked best as a sort of melancholic romantic drama. The actors were all perfectly casted in my opinion and they each delivered. 10 Years was a lovely and entertaining film.

    As I mentioned before the story revolves around a 10 year High School reunion. The first couple that's introduced in the story is Jake (Channing Tatum) and Jess (Jenna Dewan-Tatum) who have been dating over three years. Jess is going to accompany Jake to his High School reunion. Before going to the party they stop to meet up with Jake's High School buddies Cully (Chris Pratt) and Sam (Ari Graynor) who are happily married with two kids. Then they also reunite with Marty (Justin long) and AJ (Max Minghella), and with Scott (Scott Porter) and Suki (Eiko Nijo) who are visiting from Japan. The last one that meets up with them is Reeves (Oscar Isaac), the most successful person from his class who has become a rock celebrity. Together they arrive at the High school reunion and meet up with the rest of their classmates. Cully, who was the class bully, is trying to redeem himself from his past and is looking to make amends with all the nerds. Jake is surprised when he sees his ex-High School sweetheart, Mary (Rosario Dawson) arrive with her hubby Paul (Ron Livingston). Apparently Jake and Mary were pretty much a perfect couple during their teenage years. And then there's Elise (Kate Mara) who always played it low in High School, but who Reeves remembers all too well as the girl who got away. There are several other supporting characters who also contribute to the overall humor and heart of the film like Garrity (Brian Geraghty), the ¨whigger¨ and his wife Olivia (Aubrey Plaza) who had never heard of that side of Garrity.

    There is no novelty or breakthrough in this film. The story has been told before and we've seen the characters in other movies. In a way 10 Years reminded me of an 80's John Hughes movie. The film really worked thanks to some great performances from the cast and an emotionally gripping script. I was really hooked with some of the stories and the way in which these characters interacted with each other. Despite the ten years that had gone by, these characters still remained the same deep down inside and some needed closure. I loved Isaac's character and his song. His story and the chemistry between him and Mara was pretty intense. Aubrey Plaza really didn't get much screen time, but I saw her as a leading lady in Safety Not Guaranteed and there is no doubt she is really talented. Tatum got to act beside his wife once again after first meeting her on the set of Step Up. There was really a lot of chemistry between so many of these characters and they all seemed like real life friends. This is an interesting directorial debut from Jamie Linden and I hope more people get to see this good movie.
  • D P21 December 2012
    A Gem
    Definitely worth seeing. I thoroughly enjoyed this movie. It doesn't delve too deep. Its a simple story about a high school reunion but it really nails it.

    I kept seeing reviews and tweets from people along the lines of "everyone can relate to something in this movie." It is true. I teared up during a couple parts.

    I will buy this movie and I highly recommend it. Its a perfect little movie about 1 night. The acting is great and you'll enjoy a lot of laughs and maybe even a few tears.

    We can all relate to what you will see in this movie... in one way or another.
  • Film Watchin Fool16 August 2013
    What You Can Expect: 10 Years
    What you can expect from 10 Years is a predictable movie with a solid cast that revolves around the night of a 10 year high school reunion. It is well acted and you know where it is going early on, but it is still somewhat entertaining.

    Acting/Casting: 6.5* - The cast is made up of some solid actors (Justin Long, Channing Tatum, Chris Pratt, Ari Graynor, Jenna Dewan, Rosario Dawson, Aubrey Plaza), but none of them are going to wow you in this film. They play their respective roles well and believably, which is enough to make for a above average showing.

    Directing/Cinematography/Technical: 5* - I don't know that this genre of film can be directed or done anything but average. The story is obvious and blatant, which makes the directing pretty straight forward. The set is done well for a 10 year high school reunion and the music is solid.

    Plot/Characters: 5* - Again, the story is blatant and predictable, which makes the film not quite as entertaining as it could have been. Not only is the story given away early on, but the characters are fairly stereotypical as well.

    Entertainment Value: 5.5* - I enjoyed the movie and it was worth a watch, but I don't know that I would tell anyone to go out of their way to see it. If it happens to be on while you are flipping, it might help fill an hour and a half.

    My Score: 6.5+5+5+5.5 = 22/4 = 5.5

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  • Steve Pulaski21 December 2012
    Closely replicates the unintentional tension of a real reunion
    High school reunions can be equal parts helpful to ones current life position and poisonous all the same for one specific reason and that is it gives them or their new significant other insight as to who they were and what they did during their four years in school. Reunions can be a fond look back on the naive days of adolescence, when you're in that very awkward position where you're not a child or an adult, yet you hopefully begin to act like and conduct yourself as one. Or they could be places where the reminder you receive about your past is an extremely embarrassing one that could potentially corrupt current personal feelings or even have the one you married walking out on you.

    Some of these issues are touched on in writer/director Jamie Linden's 10 Years, a sweet and tender examination of several characters attending their ten year high school reunion. Headlining the picture here is Channing Tatum, in a relaxed, comfortable role, playing a man who has grown up to be quite successful with a beautiful wife (Jenna Dewan-Tatum, Tatum's real life wife) who attends his reunion to meet with her husband's old friends. HHe quickly meets Rosario Dawson, a gorgeous, now married woman, who he has fond memories of in high school, and proceeds to talk to her for the night.

    Justin Long assumes a more outgoing, rambunctious role than usual, but no one here has quite the persona as Chris Pratt's character, an obnoxious man, who now must spend the reunion making amends with those he shamelessly bullied to get a laugh in high school. Other smaller side characters include the now pop singer Oscar Isaac and the goofy, but frequently funny Anthony Mackie, providing us with a melting pot of different talents at hand here, all of which given their own time to shine.

    10 Years functions in one of the strangest ways any film this year has. It fluctuates between dull and uninteresting to beautifully entertaining. It may be similar to a real high school reunion, where you occasionally meet people you really like and others you can't tolerate. At times, I was very invested in these characters because it appears Linden gave sensitive thought and development to these characters and how they've gone through life in their own unique ways, while at other times, I was restless and hoping for something more compelling and perhaps immersing.

    The cast is unanimously capable here, as they all juggle roles they've never been fully exposed to. Tatum, Long, Dawson, and Mackie provide well nuanced performances here that are likely to go under the radar by those who walk into 10 Years hoping for something a little like the ribald and unapologetic American Reunion. Entering with that mindset will be fatal on your behalf. This picture is to be appreciated in a totally different, more sensitive light than an American Pie picture.

    Starring: Channing Tatum, Justin Long, Kate Mara, Chris Pratt, Scott Porter, Brian Geraghty, Anthony Mackie, Rosario Dawson, Oscar Isaac, Lynn Collins, Max Minghella, Juliet Lopez, Aaron Yoo, and Kelly Noonan. Directed by: Jamie Linden.
  • apenney8721 February 2013
    This movie was fun but parts where very predictable. I enjoyed that the movie showed the lives of these characters without necessarily trying to "fix" them. Many movies have recently tried to have a happy ending for all involved and in life that's actually not the case. The actors where picked well for their roles. The downfall is the depth of the characters. While, I got the total picture, and during the scenes could feel the emotions for each person involved, such as the awkward scenes being convincingly awkward and the happy scenes genuinely making me happy. In the end I didn't care what happens next. I probably would not buy this movie, unless it was on a super sale and would only leave it on t.v. if nothing else was on....
  • zoerobe5 October 2012
    Like a documentary, but that's the problem
    Warning: Spoilers
    In "Grosse Point Blank," John Cusack, a hit-man, attends his high school reunion and to the strains of Queen's "Under Pressure," gazes at a classmate's infant. The child's mom tells him that when you're a teen, you think your life is over when you grow up and have a family, but really, "it's just beginning." Would that that kind of insight was more frequent in "Ten Years," in which representatives from all the typical cliques attend their high school reunion, for the reasons quoted in the tagline. Like real life reunions, there's a lot of intoxication, true confessions and mundane conversation. The one bright spot is Chris Pratt, who plays a former bully turned family man, determined to "apologize" to everyone he used to torment. (Sample attempt to do this: "Wow, you look all normal and (bleep).") Pratt throws himself into the role with an abandon I wished some of the other actors had.

    "Ten Years," is oddly devoid of pop culture and historic event references that you might expect. This might mean it won't seem too dated eventually, but it also makes it bland. No one mentions the current economic recession (that I recall) or brings up the difficulty of finding/keeping a job, any job. While this might be a downer, it still seems a strange omission. The big secrets the characters are concealing are more generalized. It's like eavesdropping on a real life reunion, but with movies, I at least want more drama than I saw here.
  • jet1959mo3 January 2013
    Almost turned it off
    Warning: Spoilers
    I'll make this short. It was boring. Though it was probably close to someone's actual 10 year reunion, I had come so close to stopping it half way through but, we suffered through to the end. There is nothing in this movie to laugh at. Most of this film was watching a group of plain uneventful people looking back on their past. Honestly , the only good part was the song Oscar Isaac belted out. For the life of me, all the actors seemed to be hashing out something they thought was real life. Maybe they should have asked Jamie Linden if this was his 10 year reunion. I know my reunions are not as lifeless as this movie was. I do have to say some of the characters portrayed in this film have some truth, Jamie Linden could have given this film a much needed kick in the ***. I am sure glad I didn't pay to see this and only rented the DVD but, after watching this I don't think it was worth that either. I do apologize for the negativity but, I think the top actors/actresses should have said no to their rolls.
  • Gordon-1112 December 2012
    Very dull and uninteresting
    This film is about a group of high school classmates having a ten-year reunion party.

    "10 Years" has a lot of recognisable actors, but none of these talents are put into good use. The characters are poorly introduced, we don't get to know who they were in the past and who they are now. The plethora of characters, with their plus ones make a huge number of people to follow, which adds to the complexity of the plot. The events that happen are dull and uninteresting, and I just don't care about what they do with rolls of toilet paper or how bad they sing in karaoke. They only pair of characters that is remotely interesting is the rock star and the girl in yellow shoes. They have chemistry together. In short, I found "10 Years" very dull and uninteresting.
  • kate-abbott16 March 2012
    Relatable Nostalgia
    I recently saw ten year at a prescreening event and was really impressed! The movie takes place all on the night of a 10 year high school reunion. The cast is great and there are a lot of funny and heartwarming moments. Being in my late twenties myself, I found this movie to be really relatable. The cast reminded me of my friends and the plot (although a little over the top at some parts) was very believable. My boyfriend who saw it with me said he thought that there needed to be more of a plot – because it was more of a movie where you find out about the characters rather than a lot of stuff happening. I thought that a good plot wasn't the point of the movie though. There was also a really good song in the movie. Overall, I would recommend this movie to most people – especially anyone in their mid twenties to mid thirties. I probably won't see it again in the theater but I thought it was really good. It also had a very satisfying ending, which I love.
  • edwagreen13 June 2013
    10 Years! Time Didn't Fly Fast Enough *
    Warning: Spoilers
    Dreadful film dealing with still another high school reunion, 10 years after these jerks graduated from high school. You really begin to wonder how these clowns ever made it through to begin with.

    The problem with this film and others dealing with reunions is that the nostalgia they are trying to present has been so filled with clichés.

    There is always someone hiding from their past, others bragging to conceal what is really going on in their lives, and the drinking.

    We're basically dealing with 28 year old people who still haven't grown up. Perhaps, the best line in this bad film is said by the guy who was currently living in Japan. He is not coming back. He enjoys his life and why look back? Why look into this inane film to begin with?
  • gradyharp4 January 2013
    'We all have our messes.'
    Jamie Linden wrote and directed this little flimsy bit of fluff, a movie that falls somewhere between the Hangover and the Bridesmaids obsession. The concept apparently was to demonstrate what happens to high school graduates who return to their past at a 10-year reunion. Some change for the better, some for what worse, some are successful, some only claim to be successful when they are not, stars prove not to have shone for long, old tentative romances alter for both good and bad. As one character states when the evening comes to a close 'We all have our messes' and nothing could be more true.

    Jake and Jess (Channing Tatum and Jenna Dewan-Tatum) are happy but Jake can't gather the strength to give Jess the engagement ring he keeps in an envelope in his glove compartment (he is distracted by his old flame Mary (Rosario Dawson) who is married to Paul (Ron Livingston); Marty and Aj (Justin Long and Max Minghella) were fast friends in high school but both think the other is the something they're not until a thwarted race to date the once luscious Anna (Lynn Collins) only to discover that she still lives a most unglamorous life in the same place where she lived as a school beauty queen on now a mother to two children the fathers of whom she doesn't know; former high school bully and complete slob Cully (Chris Pratt) embarrasses everyone with his drunken gross behavior and is only forgiven by his long suffering wife Sam(Ari Graynor); Reeves (Oscar Isaac) is one of the few who made it as a singer and meets up with the girl Elise (Kate Mara) about whom he wrote his popular song; the others have less story fleshed out - Scott Porter, Brian Geraghty, Aubrey Plaza, Aaron Yoo, Anthony Mackie among them.

    Part of the problem with this film is the noise of the background music (attributed to Chad Fischer) that covers the dialogue through three quarters of the film. Finally in the last 10 minutes or so of the movie there is actually some story about which we care, but until that time the behavior of these '28 year olds' is obnoxious to unremarkable. Everyone has his or her messes.

    Grady Harp
  • SnoopyStyle10 September 2013
    Good Actors, Too many Characters
    Director/writer Jamie Linden gives us a big ensemble cast on their 10 year high school reunion.

    Jake (Channing Tatum) was the prom king. He is with his girlfriend Jess (Jenna Dewan-Tatum). But he encounters his old girlfriend Mary (Rosario Dawson) and they have issues to resolve.

    Cully (Chris Pratt) was a douche bully. He is still only a few drinks away from the same douche even though he is a married to his cheerleader girlfriend Sam (Ari Graynor) and a father.

    Marty (Justin Long) and A.J. (Max Minghella) are still trying to up one another, and they go head over heals for class hottie Anna (Lynn Collins).

    Reeves (Oscar Isaac) was a band geek, but is now a star with a hit song. He finally has a chance with his crush, the class ghost Elise (Kate Mara).

    Yeah, that's a lot of good actors and way too many characters. And that's not really all of them. Somebody needs to trim down the number of lead characters. The Big Chill had 8 leads, and that is probably the limit. This one had either 11 or 12 depending on how you count.

    The stories are fairly standard. It's got that profound idealism that you'd expect. Everybody has something big to do. If they lose 1 storyline, the rest could be expanded and have a little air to breathe. It's still a good watch.
  • chefmbd5 January 2013
    Waste of time and $1 from Redbox
    Did you go to your 10-Year High School reunion? Well, this movie is about as exciting as actually going to a 10-year reunion. In fact, it feels like someone just followed people around at their reunion. To think that someone wrote a script for this and Hollywood actually wanted to make the movie is pretty funny. Reflecting on that thought is funnier than the actual movie. My husband and I rented this movie after reading several reviews by people on how funny it was. Being in the mood for a comedy, we both sat down ready to be entertained. About 45 minutes into the movie, I asked my husband, "Have you laughed yet?" After some reflection, "No," was the answer. There again, that realization was funnier than the movie. I truly cannot express how bad I felt this movie was. If you really need to watch a 10-year reunion movie, rent "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion." Save your $1 and your time.
  • primojustin29 April 2013
    On-Demand, free movie with the wife...
    Lack of background meets lack of character build up, which means you really don't care what happens to anyone; but, that doesn't stop them from trying. Justin Long makes another appearance where he is the same character he's been since the late 90's. Personally I really liked him in Dodgeball, his best acting job yet. With that said, there are some funny scenes, and overall it will keep the female audience entertained while the male audience will periodically check their phones and think of ways to make conversation during the movie. When there is nothing else on, and I mean nothing won't be too disappointed. Final word; not bad for a HS reunion feel good movie that only made it to select theaters.

  • tlonuqbar29 November 2012
    film worth seeing, funny & real.
    This is a film about a group of classmates going to their ten year high school reunion. Shows where they are now, where they were, what some of them thought of how others would be at; where they would be at that point in time, in their lives…

    How people want to "save face", and how actually if you scratch the surface of people's life most of the time isn't fairy tales, it's struggle; struggle with work, relationships, yourself, your needs & your wants.

    Also deals with living in the past or in the "what if" universe or the now & real one, where something is only perfect in our minds, because reality is never perfect. It can be from amazing to disappointing.

    What is happiness? What is the right thing to do? Where are you standing in your life? It could have fallen into many clichés, but (to me) it stayed in the real point of view (with 1 or 2 exceptions)

    I would give it a 8.5 if that was possible, but since it's not I preferred the 9 Loved the approach, and still a comedy… This film is pointing towards the always great English comedy style (not there yet, but having its subtle moments, sweet-sour grin, happiness in reality is not the "infantile Hollywood" version.

    Worth seeing My comedy recommendations (not in order and just some I think are underrated): Outsourced, Death at a funeral 2007 (ENGLISH VERSION ONLY), Wild Target, Grosse Pointe Blank, The infidel, America's sweethearts, Zombieland, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, Catch 22, Big nothing, Extract, I Love You Phillip Morris
  • johnny-611-95016917 February 2013
    Very Bad
    Warning: Spoilers
    This movie was surprisingly bad. I figured since it had Channing Tatum in the movie it would be pretty good at the least. How wrong I was! I think the funniest part of the movie was when his ex-girlfriend showed up at the reunion. When I say funny, it's because putting her in this part with Channing Tatum was like mixing oil and water. These two had no chemistry and for people to say that she is beautiful must be blind! She is okay looking but this is Hollywood people! I'm sure they could have found a gorgeous "nobody" to play that part and picked her up off the streets for $1000 or less. His wife (real wife) in the movie was far better looking! The producers of this film must have been stupid to even think this film would make money. I make more in one year than what this film grossed the entire time it was at the box office. I bet they lost a lot of money on this one! By the way I never leave reviews, but after watching this movie I could not resist!
  • Destroyer Wod8 May 2013
    American Reunion for Adults
    This movie seem to be not that known actually, which is something weird considering many actors are somewhat famous, Channing Tatum and Justin Long, Rosario Dawson, Ali Greynor. Maybe not A listers but still made a lot of stuff.

    Now when i got this i expected exactly what the movie delivered... a drama with some comedic elements. My title of "American Reunion for Adults" dosen't imply you can't enjoy AR if you are an adult, but just to project that this movie is aim at a more "mature" audience and is the kind of movie you could watch with your parents, even at 28.

    I liked the movie, the humour was fun enough, the story interesting enough and the characters likable. There was no real over the top stuff like American Pie, but still made me laugh a couple time while at the same time getting into the story.

    I would say this movie is just very good for what it aim to. I am giving it a 7 because i didn't had as good of a time as some movies i rated 7 or 8, but i am SURE its mostly because i ain't much into drama usually. Yet that movie please me, so maybe i should give it a higher score, but i will go with my feelings.

    I think this is a movie that is perfect to watch with your girlfriend, there is lot of emotions, its not too vulgar, its down to earth and the cast play there part perfectly. A good movie.
  • callanvass14 February 2014
    A decent film for the real life couple of Channting Tatum and Jenna Dewan
    (Credit IMDb) The night before their high school reunion, a group of friends realize they still haven't quite grown up in some ways.

    This was a nice film that was quite decent. I've never been to a high school reunion myself, but it was a good look at how you evolve as a grown up and how life changes when you become an adult. You mature in some ways, but you forget the sense of fun because so much responsibility is placed on your shoulders. This movie explored these issues fairly well. It also helps that most of the characters are likable. Channing Tatum isn't just a pretty boy, but a legitimately good actor. Many of us have had a first love that we have never fully gotten over that we need closure with. Tatum's storyline with Rosario Dawson felt very real and poignant. Justin Long is hilarious in his role and he has important part as well. The rest of the cast is fun, but Chris Pratt got on my nerves a little bit. As far as the real life couple of Tatum and Dewan? They have great chemistry and it's obvious as to why they are in love. This is a good movie for anyone that deals with high school issues

  • aji_gps20 September 2013
    It goes exponential to the end
    At first I recognized some famous male cast and I thought, ow, it's another crappy film assembling famous stars together to get some money out of brainless viewers. Let me name some, I found Justin long immediately, then came Channing Tatum with some long hair (longer than usual, but not so long) and unrecognizable, then it was the "5 year engagement" guy and Hatty Hatterberg from moneyball, Chris Pratt, and last but absolutely not least, Anthony Mackie, an actor that I put some little respect. In conclusion, the beginning of the film seamed pretty mindless. It didn't look like it will get any better

    After a view minutes trying to leave the film and find other activities, I ended up idle. So I got stuck to the film. Deeper in the story, the girls took over. There were Rosario Dawson (bringing along Ron Livingston as his acting husband), Lynn Collins, and Kate Mara. Remarkably the story got better. The film developed in a good manner as each actor interacted with each actress, bringing their own piece of story to the movie. At the end it got even better it went to a different level of film.

    If some people say that this is any usual 10 year high school reunion well that doesn't count for everyone. For example me myself. I missed my ten year reunion for not having such awesome life back then or in the present time. So watching this film gives me some good reflection.

    I was gonna give it a 7 but ended up giving it an 8 for an exponential increase in the quality of the story.
  • vincentlynch-moonoi26 May 2013
    A disaster of a film with much wasted talent
    Warning: Spoilers
    There are a number of young actors that I have felt showed a great deal of potential in recent years, so I looked forward to watching this. I don't mind that it's a "little film", but I do mind that the talents of people such as Channing Tatum, Justin Long, Anthony Mackie, and Max Minghella are so wasted in what is a relatively boring film. Is it really possible to make a film where you sit there thinking there isn't a single character here that I would like to know? Well, yes, it's possible, and that is the one thing this film achieved.

    Of the four actors I mentioned, not to mention anybody else, there's not a single good thing I can say about their performances. I'd say it's a waste of celluloid, but of course, that's not the media films are on anymore.

    The plot...well, I'm not totally sure there was a plot or script...maybe they just ad-libed as they went along...just seems to meander through a class reunion with little or no purpose. I hope no one got paid for writing this script! Actually the film was written and directed by Jamie Linden, whom I predict will have a pretty short career.

    This film was so bad that I actually think less of the actors involved than I did before watching it. Why did they select such tripe? And did anyone have any concept of how flat an effort this was.

    I don't think I've ever given a film less than a "5", but since you can't give a "zero", I'm stuck with giving it a "1".

    To the actors: You have great potential. Be a bit more selective in the future.
  • chipura25 April 2013
    good feelin' 90s
    Let me start with this: It was like a good feelin '90's movie for me. I claim and believe they created the naive 90's soul searching youngsters in 20 somethings theme in a way. Above all, the sub stories caught me: Anna and 'the high school ''crushed'' still living with it Tpaper guys' and they have 'the glow', also the black wannabee with nice moves sub story works. The story is overall good. I thought it was going to be the American crazy reunion party with lotta booze, lies and nothing, which proved me wrong. Still, acting usually was not the best for me. What was that! Have some souls! I liked the movie but, please, we don't know the characters. It was directing, mostly on characters that gave you kinda C+.

    By the way, writing a song to the girl you... cheesy, you got it so I loved it.
  • DICK STEEL22 January 2013
    A Nutshell Review: 10 Years
    I love class reunions. It's a time to catch up with those who have disappeared from the radar, and discover just about almost everything about everyone in those few moments that you have together, as you go from friend to friend, acquaintance to acquaintance, reminisce about the good ol' days, confide precious moments with trusted few, open up to those whom you have not, and basically letting your hair down and having a great time. There's so much material possible for a movie to be centered around this, that writer-director Jamie Linden did just that for his directorial debut.

    And he managed to rope in a star studded ensemble to deliver his myriad of characters both male, female, central to the plot and supporting ones to lend some weight to a story that's made up of individual stories, encompassing just about every spectrum of emotion one would feel from going into such a reunion, especially one organized after a decade of absence. Features change, some of us have weight issues that are uncontrollable, while others have personality traits that are just overwhelmingly annoying, and continue to be so. There's always the one who got away, or the relatively low key one who continues to come and go quietly. Or how about those who had come to inspire us, while we see green at those who become more successful? Curiosity enters the picture when we see someone whom we haven't met for a long time, to want to know what's the latest in their lives.

    Obviously there will be some scenes and moments here that some may deem Linden of being overly sentimental, or probably expected in the way things pan out in the end, where unlike Life, there's proper redress and closure of outstanding issues faced. But therein lies this charm of a second chance, even if it's on film, to play out that What If scenario on our behalf. Things such as swallowing one's pride to apologize for transgressions in the past, or to come to terms with the one who had gotten away. There were the expected natural awkward moments that are common with every reunion especially when there's open business left since the last meet, and there's a chance to seek that opportunity to heal as well.

    Channing Tatum and real life wife Jenna Dewan-Tatum (his co-star in Step Up) open the film as Jake and his girlfriend Jess, the former being a little bit unsure of attending his high school reunion because of the possibility of his ex-flame Mary (Rosario Dawson) turning up as well. They congregate first at his friends Cully (Chris Pratt) and Sam (Ari Graynor), the married couple's house, together with musician Reeves (Oscar Isaac), best of friends Marty (Justin Long) and AJ (Max Minghella), and Japan-nut Scott (Scott Porter) with his Japanese wife Suki (Eiko Nijo), before making their way collectively to the reunion venue for more get togethers. With Jake still apprehensive about asking for Jess' hand in marriage, more married couples enter the picture such as Garrity (Brian Geraghty) and his straight laced wife Olivia (Aubrey Plaza), and other singles such as Andre (Anthony Mackie), Elise (Kate Mara) and Anna (Lynn Collins), the one time school flower.

    The narrative spans primarily between the venues of their high school, and the bar Pretzels, where Linden has full control over the direction, with the camera panning quite freely around table to table, couple to couple, to allow the audience to listen in to conversations, and make notes that all may not be so well for those who let their true colours reveal themselves, especially after a few drinks. We see how social lubricant leads to some to self destruct, while providing courage to others in making that first move to try and reconnect. Music also sets the stage, and having Oscar Isaac star as a famous singer helped to introduce one of the most memorable developments in his character's story arc that makes it one of many love stories that pepper the movie.

    While the stories told are nothing new, it is the delivery by the cast that will connect and move you to root the characters on. You will be drawn in, and identify with various moments in what would be a reunion you'd like to partake in as well, or wish that yours would be just as fond when you take that look back. It's guaranteed there's something for everyone here, with the end credits rounding up additional sequences that couldn't make it to the film proper. Recommended!
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