Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)

PG-13   |  Video   |    |  Drama, Western


Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012) Poster

Story of a young Wyatt Earp before he became a lawman. When someone important to him is killed he sets out to find the one responsible. He is joined by some friends among whom are Bat Masterson and Doc Holliday.


4.5/10
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  • Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)
  • Val Kilmer in Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)
  • Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)
  • Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)
  • Wyatt Earp's Revenge (2012)

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10 March 2012 | deadasjuliuscaesar
7
| Not great, but not terrible
Straight-to-video is justified, considering the low budget. However, as Earp movies go, this was more than watchable. A fairly well-structured narrative. But definitely more for those, like myself, who are fascinated with the subject matter.

Val Kilmer plays an aging Wyatt Earp giving an interview to a newspaper reporter about his involvement in the investigation of the murder of actress Dora Hand in Dodge City, which is a genuine historical event (though to what degree the real Earp's involvement actually was depends on which historian's account you may be reading). Kilmer's work is probably the most memorable element of this film, very moving, making Earp down-to-earth and realistic. The actor playing the reporter does a fine job as well (not sure who he is, but he bears a striking resemblance to Patrick Dempsey).

The actors playing the young Earp, Bat Masterson, Charlie Bassett, Spike Kenedy, etc. are also fine, though the script doesn't give them much to work with as far as deep character development. The actor playing Doc Holliday (in one scene only) is very memorable. His expressions ('daisy', etc.) may seem like they're borrowed from Kilmer's Doc from "Tombstone", but they're actually historically validated as being genuine southern expressions, and many books attribute them to Holliday. This might be the first on-screen Doc since Victor Mature NOT to have a mustache, though (for what that observation's worth).

My gripes are: a. The music score didn't seem to fit very well. That's very often a crutch with movies; the use of the music can often damage the 'mood' of a film which would be better served having no music at all. b. When Bat Masterson is introduced, he's involved in a fist-fight which employs some use of slow-motion which doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever. c. The film looks too 'neat'. A grittier, darker look would have infinitely improved the experience.

A nice thing about this film is the use of almost 'forgotten' lawmen, such as Charlie Bassett and Bill Tilghman, who have gotten very few portrayals in film.

Overall, not a complete waste of time. Again, more for those interested in Earp history. I appreciated the references to the "Buntline Special" revolver, the historicity of which has been debated for quite some time.

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