American Gods (2017– )

TV Series   |  TV-MA   |    |  Drama, Fantasy, Mystery


Episode Guide
American Gods (2017) Poster

A recently released ex-convict named Shadow meets a mysterious man who calls himself "Wednesday" and who knows more than he first seems to about Shadow's life and past.

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8/10
59,248

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  • American Gods (2017)
  • Ian McShane and Ricky Whittle in American Gods (2017)
  • American Gods (2017)
  • Neil Gaiman in American Gods (2017)
  • American Gods (2017)
  • Bruce Langley at an event for American Gods (2017)

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Cast & Crew

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Creators:

Bryan Fuller, Michael Green

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


8 July 2017 | Raptile
6
| I'm so exhausted of everything having to constantly be politicized
First off, the show is very well made visually. As for plots - when it follows Gaiman's work, it's great. When it veers off on its own it becomes horrid. The writers are really, really untalented. Their dialogue is nothing but quips and pseudo intellectualism and it stands out compared to book dialogue like a sore thumb. Their original story lines are trash.

That's not what I wanted to write about, though. I was compelled to write the review because I gave up on the show after the constant politicizing became too much for me. And it's all intentional inserts on the part of the writers, because none of those scenes (listed below) are in the book.

American Gods is one of my favorite books. One of the reasons why is because it's apolitical. Or at least it ignores hot topic issues. Here is a list of things that don't exist in the books but were inserted into the show:

1)Black man being lynched. Including constant remarks from characters about the lynching. 2)Ignorant racist Czernobog 3)Anansi wearing 20th century clothing going on a civil rights rant in front of slaves on a slave boat. 4)Illigal immigrants' plight being lionized 5)Made up story of evil rednecks massacring illegals at the border 6)Illegals are the truly virtuous ones who carry Jesus with them. Jesus is in this, yes. 7)Evil white Christian rednecks shooting Jesus. So ironic! 8)Evil white American town that doesn't care about human life. 9)The true American spirit is evil and literally Nazi. I'm not misusing the word literally here by the way. 10)Stupid sexist leprechaun gets put in place by strong woman.

If you can stomach this kind of blatant, hamfisted condescending garbage from the smug writers, I guess you can give the show a try. It's certainly well made and acted, but the writers are terrible and I'm certain the quality will keep going down as they diverge more and more from the book and ignore Gaiman's writing in favor of their own.

Thanks for reading, if you did.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character of Vulcan (played by Corbin Bernsen) was not in the source novel; he is a new addition to the TV adaptation. The character is based on the ancient Roman god of fire, the forge, and metalworking, but the inspiration for the new character did not come directly from ancient mythology. Instead, the idea came from a story that Neil Gaiman told showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green about traveling through Birmingham, Alabama, and seeing the 56-foot-tall cast-iron statue of Vulcan that overlooks the city on Red Mountain. In an Entertainment Weekly interview, Green said that Gaiman was told that during Birmingham's heyday as a steel town, one steel mill had had a policy that it was cheaper for them to pay restitutional damages to the families of workers killed on the job rather than to pay to ensure their safety. The "torch" in Vulcan's hand would light up one of three colors to communicate the safety of the Mills - a green torch indicated that no employees had been injured during the previous 24 hours, a white torch indicated minor injuries and a red torch signaled there had been a fatality in the previous 24 hours. Green said that Gaiman characterized that policy as "as modern a definition of sacrifice as there might be".


Goofs

Mr. Wednesday's Missouri license plate starts with the number 3. In Missouri, only trucks have license plates that start with a number. His 1966 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham would start with a letter, or better yet would be eligible for Missouri historic vehicle plates.


Soundtracks

Glory
Performed by Jamie N. Common

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama | Fantasy | Mystery

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