Watch Now

Prime Video

Buy from $1.99

On TV

Airs Thu. Feb. 21, 8:00 AM on BBCA (225)

The Epic Journey (S1, Ep8)

Airs Thu. Feb. 21, 9:00 AM on BBCA (225)

To the Ends of the Earth (S1, Ep1)

Airs Thu. Feb. 21, 10:00 AM on BBCA (225)

Spring (S1, Ep2)

On Disc

Amazon

Buy from $34.88

Frozen Planet (TV Mini-Series 2011)

TV Mini-Series   |  TV-PG   |    |  Documentary


Episode Guide
Frozen Planet (2011) Poster

Focuses on life and the environment in both the Arctic and Antarctic.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.9/10
20,975

Videos


Photos

  • Frozen Planet (2011)
  • Frozen Planet (2011)
  • Frozen Planet (2011)
  • Frozen Planet (2011)
  • Frozen Planet (2011)
  • Frozen Planet (2011)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


26 December 2011 | bob the moo
Amazingly filmed and engaging throughout
Looking spritely as ever David Attenborough returned to the BBC with yet another brilliant documentary series, this time focusing on the seasons across the polar regions at either end of the earth. Spread over six parts, each season gets an episode followed by one on the lives of human in the regions and then an episode on how the regions have changed over time (and temperature). I'm not really a regular viewer of shows such as this, but I do come out for the big guns of the genre and the Attenborough/BBC names tend to be of the highest quality (plus the clip of the criminal penguin that was released as a promo convinced me to watch).

It is hard to fault Frozen Planet for what it does because it is technically impressive and stunningly filmed but yet has more than enough content and specifics to prevent the show being taken as just an excuse to show off your HD TV or have visual wallpaper for an hour (although having said that, it performs that task too and needs to be seen in HD). Although it covers a lot of ground, the show perfectly captures a sense of the extremes and of the remarkable forms of life that live in and around them, some we have seen before and some we have not and I found it as engaging to see familiar creatures as I did to learn of caterpillars that freeze completely solid only to thaw out and continue living when the ice retreats. As is to be expected, some of the presentation is a touch anthropomorphised but mostly the show is pretty honest about the chances of survival and is not afraid to show us the fates of creatures who are simply unlucky or misjudge their situation. Although one tries to watch it as a documentary it is hard not to feel something when you've just watched a baby bird survive a very rough landing on its first flight, only to be grabbed by a passing fox! The final two episodes are weaker by comparison because there is less of the animals and more of the human condition and bigger picture, but they are both fascinating. I came to the fifth episode not expecting much but the study of select communities did impress – not so much those that go there with money and technology, but those that hunt and live there; the shot of the man on a rope harvesting eggs on a cliff-face was a high point. The final episode just about avoids politics by mostly just showing things and leaving the rest to the viewer, but it was still an unusual part of the show compared to other series.

As always the filming is incredible and I do enjoy the little snippets at the end of each episode where we see how they were done and the frustrations and challenges of trying to get these great shots. The results are brilliant though, whether it is a camera dropped into a creature's burrowed hole, underwater shots of whales hunting as a pack or a hunt taken from far above in a helicopter; all of them are visually impressive and often breath-taking. The degree of access and intimacy is equally impressive and it is this that really makes the show as the viewer really feels part of an environment that the vast majority of us will never see or experience for ourselves. Over all this Attenborough's familiar tones inform and entertain – on top of his genre as ever but yet modest to the end.

Frozen Planet was a great series, really hard to fault as it delivers across the board for the vast majority of its run.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

  • The Blue Planet

    The Blue Planet

  • Africa

    Africa

  • Life

    Life

  • Blue Planet II

    Blue Planet II

  • Planet Earth

    Planet Earth

  • Human Planet

    Human Planet

  • Planet Earth II

    Planet Earth II

  • Cosmos

    Cosmos

  • Cosmos

    Cosmos

  • Life on Earth

    Life on Earth

  • The Life of Mammals

    The Life of Mammals

  • Great Barrier Reef with David Attenborough

    Great Barrier Reef with David Attenborough

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Documentary

Nick Cannon Takes "The Fresh Prince" to School ...

Military school, that is. In the new episode of "UnMade," we bring "The Masked Singer" host's idea for a "Fresh Prince"-inspired sitcom to life, laugh-track and all.

Watch "UnMade"

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com