Venus in Fur (2013)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama


Venus in Fur (2013) Poster

An actress attempts to convince a director how she's perfect for a role in his upcoming production.


7.2/10
17,358

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9 December 2013 | alexander-hochdorn
8
| interesting reflection on "gender violence", expressed through simple and efficient screenplay
Roman Polanski in this movie proposes an interesting re-lecture on gender violence, topic of relevant importance in post-modern societies. The movie, limited in space, time and actors (one stage, essential screenplay, two only actors), proposes a challenge to the complexity, symbolic violence amongst genders is embedded in. It could be considered as a elegant critique to the way women are represented throughout men's "heteronormative" sexual attitudes and behaviors: treating women's bodies as objects, promoting disadvantage of women on a political and economic level (film industry in this movie), etc. But the movie also enhances a certain complexity of so-called gender roles, and the way inequalities between sexual clusters become much more fizzled as they appear in a normative, structuralist perspective. Within everyday life practices, as shown in different scenes of Polanski's film, positions related to power and domain change constantly and the reified, fix borders amongst gender categories are quite subtle. Polanski, indeed, is a director and not a sociologist and as an artist he provokes and stimulates, rather than proposing theoretical or ideological statements. His courageous and unique style in directing this movie could be considered as a reflection on the complexity of reality, and in this specific case of gender violence; an excursus on a fluid society made of fast and inter-sectional changes on all levels of experience: from micro to macro. Just some few words spent on Shizuka's previous comment: of course taste is subjective; someone likes or dislikes a certain artistic production. But I really do not understand what his legal troubles are going to do with his movie! He directs movies and people who decide to watch them, do that for a personal decision (or sometimes for work if you are a film-reviewer) and not for financing illegal behaviors. So be aware in expressing general, superficial and senseless judgments: it is like saying that watching Wall Disney's animations supports anti-Semitism or reading Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland promotes minors' sex abuses.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Emmanuelle Seigner could only shoot her scenes by day because she was appearing at night on stage in an acclaimed revival of Harold Pinter's "The Homecoming."


Quotes

Thomas: Hail, Aphrodite!
Vanda: So, you haven't forgotten.
Thomas: Forget? My most dear and old enemy?
Vanda: You're too kind.
Thomas: Yes.
Vanda: I don't have the right to a little kiss? That's better, Thomas... Oh! I said Thomas? Oops! It's so cold in here. Every time I come to visit you, I am ...


Crazy Credits

Behind the credits are images of classical artworks depicting Venus. Titles, in French as per the credits, are as follows - Titian: Vénus a sa toilette (1555) (National Gallery of Art, Washington) Ferdinand Bol: Vénus et Adonis (1658) (Rijksmuseum) Titian: Vénus a sa toilette (1555) Rubens: Vénus au miroir (1616) Rubens: La Toilette de Vénus (1608) Diego Velasquez: Venus au miroir (1651) Hans Memling: La vanité (1485) École de Fontainebleu: : La Toilette de Vénus (around 1550) Sandro Biotticelli: La naissance de Vénus (1485) Alexandre Cabanel: La naissance de Vénus (1863) Emil Jacobs: Vénus allongé et Cupidon (1839) Nicolas Poussin: Vénus dormant avec l'Amour (1628) Titian: Danae (1546) Rembrandt: Danae (1636) Joseph Helmz l'ancien: Vénus endormie (around 1600) Alessandro Allon: Vénus et Cupidon (16th century) Titian: Danae (1544) Lambert Sustris: Vénus et l'Amour (1515) Domenico Zampieri: Vénus (17th century) Jacopo Palma: Vénus allongée (1520) (Bridgeman Art Library) The final image is of the "Venus De Milo".

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Drama

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