User Reviews (18)

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  • I haven't read the manga this is based on, but I HAVE seen the anime of it which was one of my favourites in the past few years and while the plot in this movie adaptation is very sped up, it is extremely well done! The story is cohesive enough even though plot points had to be edited and the special effects are superb considering what they COULD have been... beat the socks off San Andreas which was nothing BUT one long CGI sequence. Hollywood, take note... sometimes less IS more.

    I can understand people who are new or haven't been exposed to the story possibly having a tough time 'getting it', but there really is enough to hang a story on... even with a giant chunk missing here and there. As for the detractors going on about how the original has been butchered, give it a rest would ya?? The anime clocked in at somewhere near 9 hours in it's entirety and yes, it was condensed from the manga, but what the heck do you need to be satisfied with a movie adaptation? Five to six full length movies? a few 3 hour movies?? get real here... there's an old saying that goes 'A movies length should be no longer than the average viewer's bladder capacity'. Get off your fandom, 'purist' snotty attitudes and accept it for what it is... a wholly ORIGINAL and satisfying experience that Hollywood could do FAR worse to emulate!
  • To be honest I never read the Japanese comic book version before but now, I think I should start reading one. Even though Parasyte Part 1 seems to have some unsettling moments going on, but at the end it all wraps up really well from its thoughtful and amusingly entertaining storytelling. All the actors here did their roles really well thanks to the script that leaves room for character development resulting in an effectively touching moment in the last act. The effects in the film is also impressive in an Asian film level and it gets really bloody, GORY, and disturbing throughout as well. I may not be able to compare it to the comic since I never read it but overall here, Parasyte Part 1 is an accomplishment in entertainment value while being able to add in thoughtful social context and creating a character where audience can actually care about. It's a film that you can be fully satisfy once the credit rolls but still make you crave for more sequel.

    >>A-<<
  • I loved Hitoshi Iwaaki's manga and I loved the anime just as much, so after hearing about a Parasyte live action, I got curious and decided to see if it would turn out bad or good. I wasn't disappointed, the story did progress a bit fast for my tastes but not to fast to make me dislike it. The creators really didn't hold back on gore in this movie, everything was clear and visible, from insides to cut open heads.

    The CGI wasn't bad either. the way the heads morphed into the blades and eyes looked pretty realistic. I was happy that quite a few original characters were kept in this movie, but I wished it did follow the manga a little more, but it did keep some important points. Overall, it wasn't a bad adaptation, they cut the movie off at a really good part that makes you want a sequel in which I'll be looking forward to.
  • Despite advocating for the harmonious co-existence between races (a theme that crops up in conversation too many times to be coincidence), Parasyte is a testament to human selfishness, with many characters pursuing their own desires, without thinking of other people, or the potential consequences.

    Though friends of mine see me as an 'anime addict' my lacking knowledge of the anime this feature is based upon, did not infringe upon my experience. The beginning of the film sees multiple parasitic organisms finding their way into human society, though their origins remain unexplored. Invading the bodies of potential hosts, the parasites completely take over, and despite having an obscene appetite for human flesh, they also exhibit a dire craving for knowledge, with stereotypical plans for world domination. Imagine a combination of Slither and Supernatural Season Seven, and you're on the right track. Though infected humans like Ryoko (Eri Fukatsu) have an open mind, and attempt to find a way to coexist amongst the human populace, most of her kind do not share such peaceful agendas.

    Shinichi (Shota Sometani) is a high-school student, with nerdy hobbies and few friends, though his character's life before the film is rarely touched upon. During the first scene in which we are introduced to his character, a parasitic organism invades his body, taking control of his arm. Later referred to as Migi (voiced by Sadao Abe), the creature quickly acquires great intellect, and knowledge of its surroundings, despite the predicament that it was meant to seize control of Shinichi's brain. Regardless of his situation, Shinichi is seldom seen as a sympathetic character, a certain degree of humor transpiring in regards to both his nightmarish experience, and the banter that takes place between him and Migi.

    That being said, his mother (Nobuko Izumi), and love interest Satomi (Ai Hashimoto) are certainly depicted sympathetically, though neither of them is ever provided significant screen time to be truly memorable. Shota's mother is allocated some degree of backstory, and Ms. Izumi's talents heighten her character's motherly affections. Satomi on the other hand, is depicted as either the damsel in distress, or as an object of copulation, and is rarely treated as a mature, young woman.

    Other characters, including Detectives Hirama (Jun Kunimura) and Tsuji (Takashi Yamanaka) provide the viewer with information necessary to the plot, though seldom is it explained how they themselves acquired such knowledge, while characters including Goto (Tadanobu Asano) and Yamagishi (Kosuke Toyohara) appear in cameo roles, presumably with the intent to have them portray larger roles in the sequel.

    Much like The Thing, a film which would make any viewer paranoid about their surroundings, Parasyte is a film that will occasionally leave you wriggling in your chair at the sight of such violence. Although blood-thirsty, what is most disturbing is watching such disgusting creatures eating human flesh. This is accentuated by the effects, which are truly superb, the creatures looking incredibly imaginative, unique and realistic.

    Upon discovery that those around him are being taken over, Shinichi and Migi form an unlikely alliance to combat the villainous creatures. Although Parasyte is unafraid to have characters experience great tragedy, at the same time, the film is very predictable, even for someone who hasn't seen the anime, and though the acting cannot be faulted, the melodrama did take away from some of the experience. This being said, Parasyte provides the viewer with an original experience, which is as tense as it is entertaining, though lacking information and an anti-climatic finish, may leave question marks bobbing above your head.
  • This live-action of Parasyte: Part 1 (Kiseijuu) is very well filmed. I watched the anime version of this movie before I watched the live-action and it was both great. A lot of the live-action movies are worst than the anime version but this film is not. The edition in this film is amazing and all of the things look real, just how I want it to be. The actors are also skilled and they did very well. The storyline is also great. It contains lots of excitement and some parts are a bit scary but that is what makes this movie awesome to watch. In addition, it also provides very good messages to all the audience. It was even greater than my expectation. I do not just like this movie but I love it.

    I cannot wait to watch the second part. I feel like it is going to even be better and exciting.

    I give this movie a 10 out of 10 rating.
  • Apparently, this story was a comic and an "anime", so I'm surprised fan-boys aren't out baying for the director's blood after he "destroyed/ruined/raped" their favourite cartoon with a live-action version. Which is usually the case.

    For those like myself, who had no idea of Parasyte's roots, it's easy to sit back and enjoy a film that's very off-kilter, and unmistakably Japanese.

    So, what's it all about?

    One night, some ugly crawling creatures float down from... outer space? I don't know, it's never mentioned nor does it ever need to be, but these creatures eat a person's brain and take over the body, with the head then going Resident Evil-style psychotic to feed on other humans.

    One boy falls asleep listening to music and the parasite somehow enters his hand instead, taking over just that part of his body, thus leaving him relatively intact. As the other infested bodies go about wreaking havoc, our teen with the alien hand soon finds himself up against them, and so the adventure beings.

    Aimed at teenagers, the gore level and dark undertones are surprising, but add a great deal of depth to what is ultimately a boy strolling around with a talking, morphing, glove puppet. Overall though, the characters deliver, the stakes escalate and it ends just itching for a sequel, which I'm led to believe has already been completed.

    If you can get past the first half an hour with the cute alien hand talking and curiously studying the world, you'll most likely go on to really get into this and will enjoy it a great deal for your effort; if you can't stand the idea of watching CGI monster fights against a puppet and find the whole concept too ridiculous to bear, then there's not much point even putting it on to begin with.

    Personally, I'd definitely recommend this film.
  • lryuugahideki17 January 2015
    I'm personally an anime watcher of Parasyte, so I obviously don't know about the greatness of the manga, just a disclaimer. I personally found the gore of this movie to be extremely unsettling, it's not even censored like the anime and they even try hard to feed you as much gore as possible, making the series 80% darker than it is presented in the anime. As an anime watcher, I felt uncomfortable by the way they shifted the scenes around and certain changes, but I guess it is necessary to do so to fit as much as they can into the movie. My friend who has yet to dive into this series found the story plot good, so I guess it can pass as a smooth story plot for a movie. Finally, I must really praise the CGI and sound effects used, simply spectacular. In my opinion, I would recommend watching the anime series as there is more time for slower and steadier character development, especially for Shinichi, the main character, that we can appreciate, and the gore factor is not above the roof; but just watch it and experience it for yourself. :)
  • Okay first things first...

    This is an adaptation of a single season anime. The Anime is great. BUT The movie Parasyte (Part 1 and Part 2) is also great.

    Don't do what I did. "Oh the series is supposed to be better, I'll watch that first."

    The Series is great but the movie holds it's own, especially how they develop the effects. The series takes the plot into intricate detail and kind of wreaks the movie.

    I wish I now saw the movie first and then waited a few months and watched the series second.

    Because the movies (Part 1 and Part 2) as a whole are great.
  • I've seen the anime a long time ago and, since an article recommended the movie, I've decided to watch it, too. Success! This is not only a good Japanese movie, it's a good movie in general. The actors are OK, the special effects are good, the story is cohesive and the underlying moral dilemma of categorizing humans as parasites or mere careless predators is preserved.

    To me, the greatest character was Ryôko Tamiya, and the actress was also quite good. At first I thought that she was doing the stone faced alien thing too much, but after a while I realized that it was the right way to play it. I wish Shôta Sometani would have put in more of an effort as the lead character, but he was sufficient as it was. The Migi character was well done, maybe a little too nice.

    Overall, the movie presents an interesting idea, which combines body horror sci-fi with a critique on current society. Well done, as direction and special effects go, acting, too. Also, they didn't go too Japanese, which would have made the movie less digestible for the rest of the world. I wonder why do few people watched it. With what I suppose was a tiny budget, they did great.
  • omendata2 September 2020
    I went into this without knowing anything about it coming originally from an anime/manga comic and to say I found it bizarre in the extreme is an understatement.

    It just goes to show that when you think the moviemakers have run out of ideas, along comes something mind blowing that will challenge that idea.

    The acting is excellent and the story is just bizarre, weird, strange, outlandish; so many words that can describe its crazy idea but it works - a man with what looks like a speaking male sex toy as his left hand with a human eye on it, not only was it bizarre it was hilarious and yet the extremely gruesome violence in the movie was total incongruous to the humorous side of the story.

    It really is hard to describe you really have to watch it to see it and believe it. This one deserves nothing less than a solid 7 stars out of 10 for its ingenuity, super CGI effects and solid acting from all concerned!
  • Look look i know some good acting but doesnt match they mushed it in and just dont watch it if you watched the anime
  • I've been a fan of the original manga for this story (at least the 2 American editions I know of) for a long time. It caught my attention at once, and was imaginative, surprising, and interesting. Once I'd read that the rights had been bought by an American company I wondered how they'd be able to condense this long story into a single movie. The rights expired, and Parasyte was made into 2 movies in Japan, and also an anime series. After seeing this film, I was disappointed. A problem is that all the elements that made the original so interesting could not possibly fit into a single film (or even 2 of them). A lot of changes had to be made, and characters and plot events had to be merged or deleted. I was able to watch what remained partly because I'd liked the original so much, and also because some of the visuals and segments in the film *were* worth watching. I thought the effects showing Migi and the various Parasyte battles were handled well-and that could have easily come out badly. I watched this off a region 3 DVD, with English subtitles and Japanese soundtrack, on a widescreen TV-so presentation of the film wasn't the issue. In my opinion, the only way to effectively present Parasyte as film would be as a serial. This has been done in anime form, and the product is much more enjoyable. I do intend to watch the second part of the live-action film as soon as it's available on DVD, mostly because I've seen Part 1, and I want to see how it ends. But most of the elements that made the manga so unique just aren't in the film. Maybe my opinion will change some after seeing part 2.
  • IN this day and age with CGI costing so little how could they get it so wrong. I am a fan of the anime and they massacred the movie. Here are some examples: (1) The CGI and appliances (the head) of the parasytes are pathetic. You can see they are plastic and poorly animated (2) Shin'ichi is so plastic looking and they way the actor's choices and the way he delivers lines is unbelievable. (3) The choice of actor. There was no journey and no change- (could have been the script and a one dimensional actor). Why didn't the actor wear glasses at the start and then loose them later when he got some of the parasytes cells. Why didn't they choose an actor with straight hair, who could look "nerdy" initially and then become convincing as a cold calculating human. (4) the over explanation of concepts. etc etc

    It's terrible, don't see it.I can't believe the overall ranking is 7.1. As a fan, I can't believe the owners of the movie let this be made like this.
  • 2.9 of 10. Although the opening is better than the anime's first episode in setting up the "parasyte" infection, it's mostly a letdown the rest of the way, starting with the FX/CGI. It wasn't even close to seeming real, and if you can't make it seem real, why bother with trying to do a version with real actors and objects?

    As expected, this is really just a promotion for selling 2 (hopefully it won't be a trilogy) films instead of 1. I don't know why anyone would bother when it would be much more worth the time and money to see an enhanced version of the original cartoon on a theater screen. For many people, that's not really necessary because home theater systems give you the benefits of the theater and you can watch each episode rather than a selectively truncated/revised encapsulation of the series.

    As for the sci-fi and story involved, it's the same as the cartoon, which is interesting but far from absolutely necessary to watch. Even the series is no better than a 5 of 10. This is a film to make money off of the insane fans with nothing better to do.
  • This movie is neither based on the anime or manga, the names, some of the scenes might come close to it, but in the end is a piece of... In the anime, or better in the manga - the characters are more developed, the story is more thrilling , and this > disappointment. It was a burden to watch the whole movie, with the hope at least something will be done right. No , neither Migi, Shinichi or Murano come close to the characters in the manga. Maybe Tamia , her persona is on spot. Basically - Kiseijuu part 1 is close to the story in one thing - parasites come to earth and infest humans . With the hope my favorite anime to come alive on the silver screen fading away, i am writing this as a warning to all anime fans and manga readers - watch it and in 30 minutes you'll be asking where is the story we loved ?
  • I really love the manga and the anime alot. This takes ideas and certain scenes from the manga and then makes it own. Which is good. Great visuals and good gore.
  • Alright, well aside from this being a Japanese movie and having a fairly interesting title, then I knew nothing about the movie, nor that it was based on a Manga. But my love for Asian cinema drove me to watch this 2014 movie when I was given the chance in 2019.

    I must admit that I can't really claim to be much of a fan of "Parasyte - Part 1" (aka "Kiseijuu"), because I found the movie to have a rather mundane and slow-paced storyline, with director Takashi Yamazaki at the steering wheel and not really doing much of anything impressive.

    Story-wise then "Parasyte - Part 1" was mundane, and I must admit that I actually dozed off twice along the process of the prolonged movie. Yeah, the story failed to really captivate me.

    So why did I continue to watch it to the very end? Well, for two reasons. The first reason because because I also have "Parasyte - Part 2" lined up, so I manned up and stuck with the ordeal that was the first part of the movie series. But the second and most important reason for why I stuck with it was the special effects. Granted, the creature designs were ludicrous and quite far out there, but the CGI effects were quite dazzling. In fact, I will say that the CGI team made the movie watchable by the special effects alone.

    "Parasyte - Part 1" is hardly a major milestone in Japanese cinema, and it was a movie that came without finding its way on my radar, and now that I have seen the first part, I doubt that I will ever be visiting a second time around. The movie just failed to bring much of anything worthwhile to the screen for me.

    This was a difficult movie to suffer through, because the storyline was atrocious and it was quite slow paced. Essentially it was the CGI special effects that salvaged the movie for me and the majority of the reason why I am rating "Parasyte - Part 1" a gracious four out of ten stars, whereas without the CGI special effects the movie would have been given a lower rating from me.

    A movie such as this might hold a greater appeal if you are a Japanese teenager with a life revolving around reading Mangas.
  • rakibi-5697616 August 2018
    I've enjoyed the film with full satisfication.enjyed a lot.Great adaptation . .