The Hateful Eight (2015)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Mystery


The Hateful Eight (2015) Poster

In the dead of a Wyoming winter, a bounty hunter and his prisoner find shelter in a cabin currently inhabited by a collection of nefarious characters.

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7.8/10
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  • Demián Bichir and James Parks in The Hateful Eight (2015)
  • Quentin Tarantino and Ennio Morricone in The Hateful Eight (2015)
  • The Hateful Eight (2015)
  • Quentin Tarantino in The Hateful Eight (2015)
  • Channing Tatum in The Hateful Eight (2015)
  • Samuel L. Jackson in The Hateful Eight (2015)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


30 January 2016 | featheredsun
8
| Theatric and Detailed
This is a fine piece of storytelling - a mystery, western, and political drama - all artfully melded together by a seasoned crew and talented actors.

The action is set in antebellum Wyoming, in the heart of a raging blizzard, in a frontier bar. Setting is very important here.

The period is meaningful for the political currents that flow in nearly all the characters. Feelings about the American civil war are very up-front, with complicit atrocity present in nearly all the characters. The war brought out horrible things in these people, and we see how they deal with that shared knowledge, both personally and to each other.

The blizzard provides the necessary isolation to the story. These characters are stuck with each other, and this forced closeness is central to the story - they're all Hateful, and that hate reverberates among them, destroying peace and hope. Hate is what brings them together and hate is what tears them apart. The blizzard also provides some interesting incidental elements that are fascinating to watch, like the hardship of a simple task like preparing guidelines, or going to the outhouse, and the cold hell explodes inward at times (when the door is opened) with punctuating effect, providing some breaks to the narrative, and even some needed laughs.

And the bar... This film's action takes place primarily in one large room. It feels very much like a stage play (as another reviewer mentioned), allowing greater intimacy with the characters and their interactions, while providing us with an opportunity to witness multiple scenarios unfolding at the same time. This density of action is very cool. We are afforded third person omniscience without losing connection with the motives and perspectives of the players.

And the stage setting meshes very integrally with the acting. We see the principal actors doing top-notch with not only their primary motivational actions, but nearly every choice in blocking and busy action. The director and production team make a very wise choice in showing the small little details of what's going on here. Attention is paid to realistic procedural actions, and reactions, for these details. The result is that we see characters behaving in reasonable ways to their environments, pausing to disarm a stranger, or undo a shackle, not simply because the plot calls for it, but because it's a reasonable choice that they would make at the time. Very refreshing to see, actually.

On the negative side, Tarrantino's choice to use narration was weakly executed. I don't know if there would have been a way to do this without narration, but the actual usage detracted from the ongoing story. Also, there were a few points in the action where the characters seemed to be a little too accepting of the events that transpire around them. This is purely a fault of direction/writing.

But overall, a very watchable film, that is notably unafraid to portray some very dirty and uncomfortable bits of the human psyche. Some folks seem to have an issue with this last part. My advice to them is to loosen up a bit and accept art that hurts a little. That's one of the things good art can do.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Composer Ennio Morricone was quoted as saying he would never work with Quentin Tarantino, after how his music was handled on Django Unchained (2012). He ultimately changed his mind and he agreed to score this film.


Quotes

Major Marquis Warren: Got room for one more?


Goofs

The "snow" Joe Gage tracks and allows in when he angrily enters the station does not melt and only "disappears" (leaving a bone dry floor) multiple scenes later.


Crazy Credits

The roadshow version of the film opens with a faux-vintage Weinstein Company logo, in flat white-on-blue with a very 70s font along with a "Cinerama" logo. The first few credits appear in the same font as the logo's before switching to Tarantino's usual Friz Quadrata. The standard release opens with only the normal Weinstein Company logo before going directly into the sweeping Panavision shots.


Alternate Versions

From the week of December 25th to 31st 2015, the film was shown exclusively in a 'Roadshow' version at 100 locations across North America (about half of them were 70mm film projection, the other half digital). This version played without previews and ran 187 minutes, including a 4-minute Overture and a 12-minute Intermission. The 'Multiplex' version (digital only) runs 167 minutes, and was shown from January 1, 2016 onwards. In addition to not having the Overture and Intermission, it removes approximately six minutes of footage that Quentin Tarantino felt played better in the 70mm format.


Soundtracks

Silent Night
Written by
Franz Xaver Gruber (uncredited)
Performed by Demián Bichir

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama | Mystery | Thriller | Western

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