The Lobster (2015)

R   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


The Lobster (2015) Poster

In a dystopian near future, single people, according to the laws of The City, are taken to The Hotel, where they are obliged to find a romantic partner in forty-five days or are transformed into beasts and sent off into The Woods.


7.1/10
192,483

Videos


Photos

  • Rachel Weisz at an event for The Lobster (2015)
  • Rachel Weisz at an event for The Lobster (2015)
  • Yorgos Lanthimos at an event for The Lobster (2015)
  • John C. Reilly and Colin Farrell in The Lobster (2015)
  • Rachel Weisz at an event for The Lobster (2015)
  • Léa Seydoux in The Lobster (2015)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


18 December 2015 | CinemaClown
Weird, Whacky & Wicked But Also Dull, Sterile & Vapid.
Weird, whacky & wicked but equally dull, sterile & vapid, The Lobster is a strange beast that actually begins quite well but tumbles down the road after the halfway mark to conclude on a rather uninteresting note. The concept is no doubt intriguing and it takes its time to make us familiar to the society inhabiting its tale but all of it doesn't amount to much in the end & it fails to leave any lasting impression.

Set in a dystopian future, The Lobster presents a world in which single people are arrested & taken to a hotel where they are obliged to find a matching partner within 45 days or they are transformed into animals & released into the woods. The plot follows David who arrives at the hotel for the same reason but his endeavours of finding a mate before his time is over ends far more tragically than he expected.

Co-written & directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, The Lobster marks his English-language debut and the idea & inspiration behind it is both clever & admirable. The sequences taking place in the hotel are nicely carried out but its second half lacks the same level of creativity that's present in the first half. The excitement goes missing once the protagonist leaves the hotel and from there on, it just limps throughout its remaining runtime.

The hotel is neatly maintained but it also has a creepy vibe about it. Camera movements are fluid, colour hues wonderfully compliment its overcast ambiance and lighting seems natural for the most part. Editing allows the plot to unfold at an unhurried pace but the whole story feels twice as long because of that, with no idea of where it's headed. Last, the background score is just as odd as the story's content and is intermittently utilised.

Coming to the performances, The Lobster features a fine cast in Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, Léa Seydoux, Ben Whishaw & John C. Reilly and most of them are simply bland & lifeless in their respective roles. It can be argued that the spiritless rendition of these scripted people was deliberate but it doesn't really help in enriching the experience, at all. The deadpan wit is occasionally amusing but it's also too easy to get frustrated by whatever is happening.

On an overall scale, The Lobster is an uncanny mix of bizarre ideas that, in its effort to play with multiple things at once, may end up drifting many of its viewers. While I found nothing lovable about it, its parody of the society that gives way too much credit to companionship, in addition to the dig it takes at those match-making algorithms which rely on similar traits & likeness factor is one aspect I liked but in all seriousness, The Lobster is too mediocre to be of any significance.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Who Nearly Starred in 'Charlie's Angels'?

Some of Hollywood's biggest actresses have played Charlie's Angels on the big and small screen - and many more almost landed the parts. Who else almost starred over the years?

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com