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  • Warning: Spoilers
    If you don't know anything about the original 1990s predecessor, I can't imagine what you'd be doing here, so let's skip all that introduction nonsense.

    The new "Twin Peaks" is out, and you're most likely an old fan wanting to know what you're in for. Is it the same as you remember it? Yes...and no. Lynch, ever known for his weirdness, is no longer operating under the wing of ABC network interference this time around and has been given full creative control for these 18 episodes. As you can probably expect, Lynch when he isn't being reigned in is Weird with a capital "W", but unfortunately for those fans looking for more of the same old "Twin Peaks" you're used to, Lynch isn't serving up that. Oh, the main players are all back and the town still has a neat local dive with some dreamy musical acts, but this is a bigger story in terms of scope and vision.

    For one, the series is not confined to the town of Twin Peaks and features many characters in different locations. As for the tone, Lynch obviously saw the opportunity to go all out on his weird style with no one to reign him in, and go all out he does. This is bad news for those expecting a traditional, linear plot to unfold, but great news for those who loved the more surreal aspects of the original series.

    There are long, drawn out scenes of dialogue, or sometimes just actions. The pacing is often slow and deliberate. The insanity of the original series finale comes to the fore and gets served up in heavy doses. If the original managed to pull in some viewers for the murder mystery despite the quirky aspects of the series, this one disregards those fans altogether by refusing to throw them a bone. Oh, there is a story here, but it's no longer centered around a marketing campaign masquerading as a murder mystery and it isn't going to be told in clear and cut A to B fashion. You have to either be willing to follow Lynch on where he wants to take you or give up in frustration and part ways. Because in terms of differences, that seems to be the main one here: Lynch is doing this his way...and you're either with him or not. This doesn't make it easy on traditional viewers, and I fully expect them to be out once they get to the end of the premiere.

    Me, I am loving the fact that there is nothing else like this on TV. The same could be said of the original when it aired, and it's shocking how much changes and yet stays the same considering we're 25 more years along and it still takes David Lynch to serve up something truly unique on television. What have these other guys been doing? My boyfriend watched an episode of "Sense8" when I was finished watching the premiere, and the difference in what is passing as entertainment today felt like I had gone from a pristine environment with "Twin Peaks" to breathing in pollution. This is the perfect antidote for someone tired of having their emotions led and manipulated by TV shows that tell you exactly how to feel and think. It's not going to cater to you or babysit you like a child. If requires patience and imagination, and for those willing to stick with it, the results can be so rewarding. Think of it as a purge from all the derivative crap we watch without even realizing how banal it is. Because it takes watching this new "Twin Peaks" to realize just how mediocre our "hit" shows really are. I look forward to being cleansed once a week for the next few months.
  • David Lynch is at his best here in the new Twin Peaks series. There seem to be few restraints on his artistic vision, and it's all framed in a familiar story with Mark Frost's tempering still present.

    Disclaimer: if you were not a fan of the original series because it was too weird, or "slow", or disturbing, then you will probably not like this latest season. There are tons of weird and disturbing scenes, and Lynch has no qualms making you stare at something for long periods of time. This has the effect of drawing you in as a viewer, but for some it may be off-putting or even offensive. He definitely, as always, takes firm grip on your viewing experience and will not let go.

    I was worried going into watching the first 4 episodes that they would just reunite the cast and kind of riff off the original series. From very early on, however, it becomes apparent this is whole new material. Loved characters are still there (almost all of the old cast), but they are going through brand new things.

    However, the charm of Twin Peaks is still alive and well. The most bizarre and yet oddly insightful scenes are counter-weighted constantly with everyday buffoonery.

    I was pretty amazed by some of the new visual ideas Lynch had, which shouldn't be surprising because he is a master at surprising his audience, but you never know if someone might just run out of ideas. Clearly this is not the case. In every episode, there is tons to wonder and behold.

    I'm very happy that Lynch is directing every episode. In my opinion, much of the "middle part" of the old series was tiresome. This is understandable because apparently Lynch was often off doing his own thing, leaving the production without a guide, but he is apparently fully on-board for this new project, and for that we are thankful.

    All of the cast is great, really great, but it's really a treat to see the amazing combination of Kyle MacLachlan's acting under David Lynch's direction. The two just work so damn well together, and there's tons of new material here for MacLachlan to work with. It really is a pairing that ranks up there with Jimmy Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock.

    Kudos to Showtime for reviving my favorite show on TV, and allowing David Lynch to do what he does best. Here's hoping the season is a great success and we get even more! I watched the 4 episodes available tonight, and I am sad that it will be two weeks until I see another new one. However, I've waited 25 years for the first one, so a couple weeks shouldn't be too difficult. It's really nice to have an amazing show to look forward to again.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Possibly one of the best TV dramas ever, "Twin Peaks" managed to return in a challenging and unique way It is bizarre (not to mention intelligent) piece of television that has returned again with putting the pieces of puzzle together..

    Lynch introduced the first two episode in typically enigmatic fashion, recalling the tall trees which envelop the logging town-setting for Twin Peaks' supernatural mysteries.Original cast members Kyle MacLachlan, who plays FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper and Sheryl Lee (Laura Palmer), reprise their roles, while new additions include Naomi Watts and Laura Dern.

    In short, the new episodes are completely unlike any version of Twin Peaks we've seen in the past, and that's what's so exciting. This is no retread; this is something new. After you've seen the show for yourself, I'm guessing it's all you're going to want to talk about. It's going to be a wonderfully nightmarish summer. Music again plays an important role in establishing Twin Peaks' atmosphere with Portland, Oregon band The Chromatics contributing to the soundtrack.

    If you get a chance to watch Twin Peaks now, and I highly recommend that you do, it may seem strange that such a show was ever on TV at all. This is because most of television is so bland and boring and repetitious while TP is fresh and original and effective.  Daring and provocative, it shattered the boundaries of most standard soap operas/TV dramas.There are great characters sprinkled throughout, my favorites being:Leland Palmer, and of course Coop, but really they're all interesting

    To finish, one needs to watch that 90's version of show. It's not uniformly brilliant and sometimes just plain weird, but always rewarding and truly one of the landmarks of American television. Go get a nice piece of cherry pie, a cup of coffee, take four days off work and start watching it. Then watch how this masterpiece unfold..
  • First of all, let me start this review of the third season of Twin Peaks by saying that I deeply love the first and second seasons. They truly are iconic seasons of television, and having recently re- watched them, I came to the conclusion that they firmly stand the test of time.

    However, one of the main problems I had with the first and second seasons of Twin Peaks (Although it was mainly in the latter, than the former) was it's deviation away from the central component which I believed made the show tick- the mystery. The mystery of Twin Peaks submerged this seemingly 'normal' town into an environment in which there were endless different otherworldly phenomenon at play. The original Twin Peaks created a feeling of uneasiness for the audience through numerous ways, such as Bob. This feeling of mystery and unease however, became somewhat tangled up in many different love stories which were all a bit too common place in the show. Nevertheless, I persisted with it and still found it to overall be an enjoyable show, despite the various James-Donna-Laura-Maddie-Bobby-Shelly-Leo stories which stretched on.

    Now, when I got to this season, I was not disappointed. Season Three of Twin Peaks takes the mystical and the downright weird elements of the first and second season and places them into a show of their own. I would imagine that many of the original viewers who enjoyed the soap opera element of the first and second seasons, will be extremely disappointed. This series is unlike anything else that I have ever witness on television (yes, I did say that when I watched Twin Peaks the first time around!). The revival of Twin Peaks has come at the best possible time, for both the show and television. Modern Television now allows for less constraints on many shows, and more recently, risks have been allowed to be made. The original seasons of Twin Peaks were risks in themselves, but they still had boundaries attached to them. Lynch could not deviate as far as he can today. This combination of modern television and Lynch's vision create a spectacle for television which is unlike anything there has previously been. Some of the visual shots of different elements of the mythology in the new season of Twin Peaks, are absolutely remarkable and unique. The precedent for season three is well and truly based upon Lynch's exploration of Twin Peaks mythology.

    Whilst there is a new depth to the show, as we travel further afield to New York City and South Dakota end explore the mythology, the scenes which place us back into the town of Twin Peaks contain the finite amount of nostalgia for the series. It doesn't feel as if there has been a shoehorning of nostalgia in this season, rather the scenes feel appropriate and suitable for the show. Therefore, whilst the show is extending its branches beyond the town of Twin Peaks, the return to the town does not feel as if the show is doing it for the sake of it.

    Overall, the new season of Twin Peaks is truly a remarkable piece of television. I find myself wondering 'what if?', in terms of what if we never experienced this show returning? This series could be when Twin Peaks hits another level and surpasses the original run. It will take till the end of the season before we can truly determine that. However, I would urge anyone who was interested in the original run, and anyone who is interested in groundbreaking and unique television to give this show a try. You may not like it, it may deviate too far from the original seasons which you enjoyed so much, or you might find it deviates too far from what you are normally used to. Nevertheless, I believe that this is a show which should be watched to at least engage with the uniqueness of the experience that comes with watching it. So sit back, get yourself some cherry pie and a damn fine cup of coffee and enjoy what is a masterclass return to Twin Peaks.
  • What a fascinating case of mass self-delusion this has been. It's truly amazing and disgusting how heavily people are stroking themselves over their ability to force themselves to choke down something that is so very poorly executed just so they can reach that oh so "clever" hidden story within.

    Look, I know that it must be very comforting to keep talking down to people about how they just don't get the weirdness and complexity of it all (because WOW, use of metaphor and non-linear storytelling in the video medium? UNHEARD OF!), but that's really not the problem here. It's the absolutely abysmal pacing and structure. Yes people, we get it. Lynch likes to pull the same old thing out of his bag of tricks that he always has, where he tries to artificially induce unease by drawing scenes out well past their welcome, except instead of the handful of times spread out across a 2-3 hour movie we are now treated to 45/60 minutes of this filler in each episode of an 18 hour saga, leaving very little room for any actual worthwhile content. You don't need to be a mathematician to see that the ratio between the two is incredibly uneven.

    But OK, yippee hooray for ARTISTIC INTEGRITY! He has such complete free rein to spew out completely unfettered streams of consciousness that no one at all will dare to tell him that maybe things like having a confused old woman talking to the police about who has the keys to a door for 10 straight minutes is an absolute waste of film, and none of you will dare admit that this pile of slop is in dire need of editing because you're too busy preening about what an artistic genius Lynch is, and how open-minded and avant-garde you are by extension for being able to wrap your heads around a plot that's literally been done a hundred times before in superhero comic books.

    A big slow clap for you all.
  • When someone works hard at something or does something for a long time you can surmise that they well eventually get good at that thing, even masterful. Generally, this is the case for all great directors and David Lynch is no exception. With the newest Lynch-piece we are given something that is an amalgamation of all his previous work without sacrificing his style or creativity. We see the dark-industrial vibe of "Eraserhead", the American suburbia and the dark underbelly late-night bars/clubs/people from "Blue Velvet", "Wild At Heart", and "Twin Peaks", the winding roads and nightmarish features from nearly all his projects specifically "Lost Highway" and "Mulholland Drive", and then last but not least, we see the venture into the digital age with non-linear story and the craziest sound design you may possibly experience in any piece of media that we get from "Inland Empire". There are even remnants of design that hearken back to his old shorts.

    This folks, is Lynch's swan song. The Return is already like nothing else ever before on TV and this includes the original two seasons of Twin Peaks.

    Lynch allows the material to breathe, and gives the viewer plenty of time to absorb what's on screen. The filming is patient, and every shot is most definitely taken with care. The slow yearning shots is what Lynch uses to draw you in. The unfamiliarity of new faces leaves you with more questions than before. Also, as most already knew going in, The Return is set in many different locations--not just that charming, wholesome town of Twin Peaks. Even knowing Lynch's filmography there are moments that still have me unprepared for the amount of visuals and sounds that evoke nightmares. More terrifying than 90% of what I've seen as a film-goer.

    I have to admit that it is taking me some time to adjust to the new vibe of the series knowing well in advance that Lynch and Frost have stated that The Return will be more like the prequel movie FWWM. I am someone who prefers the film to the series because Lynch had more room to work toward his vision. The result is a surrealist nightmare that The Return will have beat by a landslide. With that said, there will be many of you who will not like this at all (even folks who enjoyed the original series because The Return is THAT different). Lynch is certainly an acquired taste and everything isn't for everybody, but for those of you who are willing to give it a shot and appreciate an artist in his top form then maybe there is still some redeeming qualities in this for you. The Return is no run-of-the-mill action series or soap opera so be ready for one of the craziest rides you may ever be on.
  • askfxxx14 June 2017
    Warning: Spoilers
    This revival of the beloved show should never have been.. Try to remember the cool flow of the first two seasons, and then imagine turning the speed to about 5%..

    It's like walking under water, I completely understand how this is supposed to make me feel, but it's just so overdone that I want to rip my nails out just to feel something.

    We are constantly introduced to to new characters, none of which are very interesting, and most of them don't seem to have anything to do with the story (if there ever was any). It's just a big mess of weird dialogue and loooong scenes with absolutely no content or context whatsoever.

    It might be wrong mentioning the word unrealistic in regards to this show, but why the hell wont anybody just take Doug to the effin' hospital? He's been shuffling around like a complete imbecile for days, weeks maybe (it feels like months) and not his wife, friends, boss, the police or anybody seems to think that it would be a good idea to have his head checked, this is actually the most annoying detail to me at this point.

    I am currently on Episode 5 and I feel like I HAVE to power through this in awe of the first two seasons, but it feels like Lynch is ripping me off. The show is a complete waste of my time, but I have to keep going to see what happens (if anything), it's very painful.

    How this piece of junk got a 9.3 score here is beyond my comprehension.
  • Anorosie6 August 2017
    Warning: Spoilers
    Long, pointless scenes, drawn out until you want to gouge your own eyes out. Dozens of pointless characters introduced and just as quickly abandoned. Terrible pointless music sequences.

    Special scorn for the acting. I've seen better acting in porn films. Seriously. And since some of the actors I know for a fact are excellent at their craft, acting this bad can only be due to direction. I'm embarrassed watching people like Naomi Watts in this. Special mention goes to Chrysta Bell in the worst FBI agent performance ever committed to film.

    Memorable characters from the original series are reduced to cartoon characters. The exception is Dana Ashbrook's Bobby Briggs, whom I was glad to see grew up to be a decent guy.

    Oh and story? There is very little. Maybe ten minutes of every hour moves the plot, the rest is just pointless, navel gazing drivel.

    Addendum: after watching the entire series, not only has my opinion of it not improved, but it's actually made me retroactively hate all previous incarnations of Twin Peaks.

    Submitted for your approval: a typical scene, in my humble opinion:

    Gordon Cole, Albert, and Special Agent Cheesecake are all sitting in a room that for some reason is filled with racks of digital guitar effects. Diane walks in and sits down. She States "Deputy Diane reporting as ordered." (I guess she doesn't have a last name.) She discloses a bit of information, one that the other characters couldn't possibly have known. Mind you, this information ends up having nothing whatsoever to do with the story. After she delivers the exposition, SHE GETS UP AND WALKS OUT. What? Why had she been summoned there in the first place? I guess we'll never know.

    If your reaction to this scene is to fawn all over David Lynch, and sing his praises, then by all means, give TP17 a shot. If, like me, your reaction is to shake your head and mutter that it makes no sense, then stay away. It's eighteen hours of this. I took the bullet and watched this so you don't have to. Don't let my sacrifice be in vain.
  • A Lynch devotee could simply not have asked for anything more for Twin Peaks of 2017. This is what Lynch has been working towards his entire career. What he has given is NOT a retread of the Twin Peaks we know circa 1990, this is a new beast entirely. It's dark, it's beautiful, it's everything that makes Lynch one of the finest artist working today.

    If the first few episodes start to make you long for the whimsy and hokiness of the original series, keep going through to Ep4. Lynch is giving this world time to breathe this time around. By the time Ep. 4 arrives we being to see where things are heading and watch this new world start to join with the old Twin Peaks we have all been missing for 25 years.

    This is Lynch' OPUS.
  • Quite simply, I loved the original TP. I even like most of David Lynch's work, although not all of it. But in watching this, all I can say is, DL, either go BACK on your meds, or get OFF of your meds-- whichever is making you think that this crap is worth watching. If it gets renewed, I'll know that you obviously have the pictures of some studio boss somewhere, with a kid and a dog. And you KNOW what I mean.

    The ratings? Want to amuse yourself? All those haughty 10-star ratings, saying "if you don't get it, well, go watch some drivel someplace?" Click through and look at the OTHER ratings from those folks. Oh, wait...almost NONE of them have, wait for it, any other rating or review--ever. And that one review is for TP 2017, as it happens.

    You know, all these years, I've never really believed in the big Paid Reviewer conspiracy/meme that's been all over the Net--but I do now. All these inexplicable 10 ratings, for a show that is simply dreck--and wow!--all these raving fans of auteurs everywhere, have ONLY decided to review ONE SINGLE SHOW? C'mon...paid reviews, anyone? I'm surprised, IMDb--you're owned by Amazon, and I'd have thought you'd have tumbled to this by now, as you've banned it on the Mothership site.

    The show is simply unwatchable. I've tried, I have, but the myriad criticisms leveled by other reviewers here are accurate--the show is slowed down to beyond boredom level. In ep 7, Lynch runs film of a guy sweeping up a bar, for TWO MINUTES, after which, the bartender answers a phone call and has a cryptic convo about 15-y.o. hookers. Two minutes? Then we have this ridiculous discussion between Henry Horne, and Ashley Judd, wasting another 5 minutes, in her office, chasing some "hum." The nonsense with Dale Cooper being a Zombie? We watch him stumble around, monosyllabic--not even knowing how to pee(??)--for WEEKS? And nobody takes him to a doc? Nobody notices that he acts like he's had a stroke? His domineering wife doesn't domineer him to a doctor?

    The whole "symbolism" shtick is simply agonizing. The psuedo-60's- trippy "let's see someone's consciousness" stuff is, well, 50 years old. If I see one more distorted-convo crap, I'll shoot my TV. And, of course, Lynch HAD TO put himself in there, as Deaf Albert, which wasn't that damn amusing originally, much less now.

    What a SHAME. I was dying to see this show...now I'm dying to never see it again. It's simply horrible. I literally cannot see any sane studio exec in charge of properties greenlighting this. I'm sure it sounded like a great idea--who wouldn't think so, reinvigorating TP, right, the cultural phenom of the 90's?--but this is NOT what anyone expected. The only thing that this has to do with TP is ripping off the same characters and same actors. Even the shtick--like the ever- idiotic Lucy--is old and tired. Watching Lucy flip backwards in her chair, because she's "scared" that the Sheriff walks in, while talking to her ON the phone, after a quarter century of cellphones? Oh, come ON. Lucy was naive, and sweet, and not bright, but she wasn't a moron.

    Enough. DL, retire gracefully from the field. This was an egregious misstep.
  • I truly enjoyed the first season of Twin Peaks. The second season was just OK. I thought the movie was great. It explained a lot stuff about Twin Peaks. But this new season so far has been excruciating to watch. It is so slow and trying so hard to tell us something. David should just come out and tell everybody what was on his mind, instead of trying so hard to do so using so much of his beloved tunes, bands or overstretching silences. Fuzziness does not stand for profound deep knowledge. Thanks GOD we have got the skip/forward functions.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Only recently have I finished watching the original two series of Twin Peaks. I missed out when they initially aired – at the time, I was only a few years old – but the release of the new series motivated me to watch the original Twin Peaks. A dark undercurrent flowed through the original series, expertly woven together with goofiness, silliness, paranormal activity and plenty of black comedy. Characters were weird and wonderful, and even those you perhaps thought were annoying at first were strangely likable (for example, Dick Tremayne). I loved the original Twin Peaks and I strongly suggest that anyone who hasn't watched it should put it on their 'To watch' list immediately. Each show is 45 minutes of pure delight. But enough of the original Twin Peaks, let's move on to Series 3.

    I appreciate that much has changed in 25 years and TV viewing preferences have morphed but the third series left me thoroughly underwhelmed and disappointed. I'm not someone who dislikes weirdness or having my mind messed with, far from it, but this series was weird purely for the sake of being weird; a sentiment clearly shared by many others. It (Twin Peaks 3) isn't metaphorical or allegorical, even at some obscure level, contrary to those who say they 'interpreted' the various elements of the series as such. For the most part, it's an incoherent mess of non-relevant characters engaging in equally pointless interactions. Worse still, it's boring.

    Some of the series' 'highlights' include a man sweeping a floor for about 3 minutes, Dr Jacoby spray painting shovels for what felt like an age, and episode after episode of characters staring blankly at each other, waiting an eternity before delivering their lines. The Douglas Jones aspect became tedious almost immediately. The police officers /detectives who were supposed to be funny, notably the one with the idiotic laugh, were about as funny as haemorrhoids. And the less said about episode 8 the better. Watching a nuclear explosion in e-x-t-r-e-m-e-l-y s-l-o-w m-o-t-i-o-n, the Giant floating upwards for minute after painful minute, and a full performance by Nine Inch Nails?! If I wanted to watch a music video, I'd go on YouTube. The pacing of each episode was excruciatingly slow, just for the sake of being slow; the 55-minute episodes could easily have been condensed to 20 minutes and they still wouldn't have felt rushed.

    The original series tackled dark issues and the supernatural but it didn't resort to nudity, swearing or any particularly graphic content, things which are now all too common in series three. Not that any of these things bother me at all but they simply have no place in Twin Peaks; in my opinion, it's just not that type of show. Most of the swearing feels totally excessive, unwarranted, forced, and included for no other reason than to include some swearing. The sex scenes seemed pointless too, especially the one in the first episode that was put in purely for Madeline Zima to flash her flesh. The graphic scenes (the crushing /bursting skulls spring to mind) also appeared to have been added for sake of showing graphic content.

    Moving on to the original cast and original locations, in series one and two Norma's café, Norma, Shelly, and later Annie, all played important roles. They were the equivalent of the local pub and friendly bar staff that you find in any soap opera, the community hub of the show, if you will. However, in series three Norma's seemed totally irrelevant, as did Norma and Shelly. Audrey too was pretty much a special, and pointless, guest, as were Nadine and Jacoby. In fact, the majority of the original characters were borderline irrelevant and it would have been much better if they hadn't been included at all.

    The Bob /Agent Cooper, Douglas Jones /Agent Cooper, Gordon, Albert and Tammy characters and associated themes were (mostly) consistent throughout the entire series. However, virtually everything else that happened was a collection of unconnected mini stories with no bearing on anything else outside of their own tiny sphere of interest; essentially random and irrelevant content. I have seen the words 'Masterpiece' and 'Perfection' thrown around all too liberally in many reviews of the latest series of Twin Peaks and all I can presume is that I was watching something completely different. The climax of the finale would have been quite good if I (like many others) hadn't already given up caring as to what was actually happening, or why, three quarters of the series earlier.

    There were a few (heavy emphasis on the word 'few') good points though, it wasn't entirely bad. I liked Gordon, very much how he was in the original series and he delivered a few lines that made me laugh when he responded to things he'd misheard. I found the casino scene – "HEELLLOOOO!!!" – very funny, very Twin Peaks. I liked the song by Au Revoir Simone during the end credits of one episode. And oh yes, you get a few minutes (quite literally) of the ACTUAL Agent Dale Cooper in the penultimate episode in which we are finally shown his friendliness, determination and idiosyncratic personality.

    However, I think I need to end this review on probably the biggest failing of the series, something I allude to above. Why oh why oh why was Kyle MacLachlan reduced to a brain dead idiot for 80-90% of the series when he is brilliant at playing the real Agent Cooper? It makes no sense at all, a bit like the series.

    Twin Peaks was just one large, Lynch-driven, 18-hour vanity project. If it hadn't been called, 'Twin Peaks' or had Lynch's name attached, the series would have been instantly overlooked by far more entertaining new TV shows like, 'Watching paint dry in 60 minutes' and 'The floor sweeping world championship'. Ultimately, it would have disappeared into obscurity, which I suspect it still may.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Although I've not enjoyed very much of The Return (with the exception of the exceptional Mitchum brothers and their female associates) I've done my very best to like it. To try to accept and understand it, but I find myself failing at that. Jeffries as a tea pot, an hour-long episode of a nuke going off and 15 episodes of Dougie. It's just a bit much to me. Throughout, there's just not very much to like about it.

    It's like a friend of my told me after a few episodes. The original series was quite an ordinary show, with an odd artsy twist to it. The Return on the hand is nothing but odd and artsy, and that's why it fails to capture me. There's nothing much to relate to anymore. Nothing much to make me care about the faith of the characters or their world(s).

    As for the ending, I'm quite disappointed with that as well. The idea of fate resetting, with new pieces but the same evil pulling the strings, is good. However, I feel that Lynch/Frost failed to deliver it in any sensible way, much as the failed to deliver anything in a sensible way this season.

    I loved the original series. The cast, the characters, the story, the atmosphere. I don't think I'll ever learn to love this show the same way. I'll keep struggling with it though. In a few years I'll have watched 3-4 times, and maybe I'll see it under a different light then. I really hope so. But I don't expect to.
  • The 1 star is for MacLachlan managing to shine in this utter turgid disaster. In fact, the man deserves an Emmy for being the only thing breathing life into this sterile nihilistic nonsense (no thanks to Lynch+Frost). The people raving about this are pseudo-art-house lovers. This is utter garbage masquerading as art-house. After giving this the benefit of the doubt, I don't just hate it: I wanna spit it back out of my head and separate it from my loving memories of the old, great Twin Peaks. And this is coming from the artiest of arty viewers with diverse international tastes who has sat through some of the weirdest, slowest things ever put on screen.

    Congratulations, Lynch. You have now managed to make the Evelyn Marsh, Dick Tremayne and Billy Zane sections of the 1st 2 seasons look like gold in comparison. This production is the single most awful,repulsive thing I've ever seen on screen. It's right up there with watching a live octopus being eaten by a actor in a Korean film. At least the latter was mercifully brief...
  • First of all the third season does not have the same feeling as the first two, it is a totally different movie: the ambiance is different, the way the characters are portrayed is different, the dialog is different, the way the action is taking place is different; everything is different. Most of the action takes place outside Twin Peaks. I can easily say that the third season is a collage of surrealistic and abstract imagery that makes no sense, the story and the details that made the first seasons of Twin Peaks are simply not there. Too many characters that are not contributing to the story. Too little time on screen for the old characters. Everything moves too slowly. It lacks in coherence at all levels. The surrealistic entities and the mysterious behaviors of the characters are lame and mindless in an ugly way. At the time I made this review I just finished the part 8. I can clearly say that this is the last part I will watch from this show. As a David Lynch creation I can say that this is the worst one ever. I cannot find any reason why this show received positive reviews and has 9 out of 10 stars.
  • Lynch is amazing, Lynch this Lynch that.

    Everyone is so desperate to love David Lynch I don't think they are watching the balls he's making. are there any reviewers that like this without creaming over how amazing David Lynch is? what other TV series does that happen with? where the guy making it can just do a load of nonsense, star himself in it, make it weird and everyone thinks it's genius.

    This isn't genius, the first two series were great, although it lost it's way a bit. But at least it had a goal, a story line. Which is just lost in this series.

    There's too many story lines that mean nothing, they won't reappear later and make sense of anything, they are there for no reason, dozens of characters you'll never see again but you wast too much time watching them think about something. each episode has 5 minutes where an awful band sing a song.. that's it, an awful band sing an awful song for 5 minutes. every episode. that's a tenth of the whole show watching a bad music video. it's ridiculous that you have to watch a 9 inch nails advert for 5 minutes before moving on with the show..

    Kyle Maclachlan walking around aimlessly got boring very quickly... how they persist in this the whole serious is beyond me. it's boring, the jokes are the same.

    Apart from that... there is some good stuff going on, a couple of clever story lines and interesting developments, enough to carry on watching, but there's just too much filler to make it anywhere near on par with the original series
  • Thanks to the inventors of the forward button. I watch most of the episodes of this season holding down that button most of the time. Especially the 8th episode. I finished that in less than 10 minutes. THIS IS NOT TWIN PEAKS. Original Twin Peaks had an engaging plot.It was full of compelling characters, their relationships and my God that good old town.

    May be some of you will defend the new season by saying about Lynch's visionary style. I have got a question for you. Would you have accepted it if this was made by an amateur filmmaker??

    It is simple. They tried the psychological BS with the second season which apparently did not work for majority of the audience. And now they are desperately trying to clean up the mess with even more BS. For me the series ended with Cooper saying "Into the light" to you-know-who. That was a proper ending right there.

    Believe me I'm not a person glued to a particular genre. I'm open to unconventional ideas in movies and television. But this has taken things too far. I kept watching it thinking may be Lynch is trying to mess with us and will get back on track slowly. After the 7th episode I strongly believed that. But now I have lost faith.

    Last request: Pls don't ruin the characters we once loved so much. So Long!
  • DON'T believe them. ALL the negative reviews just happened to end up at the back of the title now even while it has gone down from a 9.9 to a 9?

    This series, beyond any other series ever put on television, is utter and complete garbage and even that is giving it too much credit, as maybe a hobo can find some sort of useful thing in a pile of trash. This series is beyond salvageable, but like always, you will have people rating on PAST works. That's so ludicrous. Imagine if the first time you saw your girlfriend she looked great, but every time afterward she looks awful, but you keep dating her because you know that good-looking chick is in there somewhere even though you may never see her again. I could use a hundred analogies, but why even bother. This show is tripe, with maybe five minutes of 'okay' for every three hours of "awful". What is irksome is that a really good series was probably shelved in order to accommodate this brainsore. IMDb used to be someplace you could more or less trust for ratings and reviews. That's out the window.
  • When Twin Peaks first aired in the 90's, I considered myself to be the biggest fan of the show. I could not have been more eager to watch the "the Return" . What the hell went wrong! Every single week I ask myself, why the hell do I keep watching and it's because I still can't bring myself to believe that a show which was once such a fantastically brilliant watch, could be so terrible! I have held high hopes, but I just can't and I'm done. Each episode of The "return" consists of 30 sec scenes switching from a man staring at smoke, a stranger looking in the trees, a child looking out the window while his crackhead mother yells out numbers, Dougie aka Cooper walking around like a penguin unable to speak or button up his pants, eat or open car doors while no one including his wife seems to think anything is wrong, 30 sec of strange incomprehensible graphics, another 30 sec of new characters having a what seems to be irrelevant conversation, another 30 sec of men eating cereal, then finally ending with random people in a bar sitting and watching a band. I truly did not want to give up hope but after 15 episodes, I am done. Done and miserably disappointed. At this point I feel like the writers just mocked their viewers and could care less. Seriously, if you didn't want to make another season then you shouldn't have.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Latest episode (8). A few homeless men revive Cooper's doppelganger and Bob's head pops out of his stomach in a slimy bubble. A rock band performs for five minutes, a nuclear explosion is unfolding for ten. The explosion triggers something in space to puke something, including Bob's head in a bubble. A giant in space views the event on a cinema screen, gets lifted up, and from his head oozes Laura's face in a yellow bubble, which is sent down to the United States through a saxophone pipe. There, an evil Abraham Lincoln asks people for a light, then crushes their skulls and goes live on radio to say something about a well and the white of the eye which is a horse. A swarm of homeless men wander. A cockroach-frog mutant crawls into a girl's mouth. Evil Lincoln walks out into the darkness.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Some background info to understand my view point. 45 years old, loved Twin Peaks Season 1, was bored midway Season 2 but loved the last cliffhanger episodes. Don't care about most of David Lynch's films but loved "Mulholland Drive" which was exceptional.

    This season is crap! The direction is static and the story lines are static. There are many story lines that have nothing to do with the main plot and will never be resolved. Most of them look like fillers and have usually famous actors in them. I am guessing that the Amanda Seyfried related scenes were shot in 1-2 days. It looks as if David Lynch asked some friends for a cameo and made a TV series out of them. Together with the early news about budget fighting with Showtime, I am tempted to say that I am sure about this.

    On top of this most of the actors' delivery is devoid of passion and coherence. David Lynch apparently only gave them their own lines with no back story.

    Last but not least, I hate being laughed at. David Lynch has more than one scene where is he is actually talking to the audience. The scene where Gordon Cole looks at an irrelevant escort get dressed for 3 minutes and then turn to his colleague and says something like "Chill and enjoy life". Sorry mate, 14 episodes into the series and nothing is happening. And sorry, if you have buried some clue to what is happening in episode 2 and you then show another ten episodes with random other stories, it is not my fault that I cannot connect the dots. And this does not make David Lynch and Mark Frost geniuses, just bad story tellers.

    (edit after the finale) 1. Kyle MacLachlan's performance through the series and the final episode is amazing.

    2.The finale invokes many dark feelings and opens the door to multiple different interpretations; in itself not a bad thing. BUT more or less the overarching feeling that it conveys, is that Lynch was looking down upon the viewer for wanting a continuation of the series. By continuation I do not mean a simplistic resolution nor a grand theory of things. It feels as if Lynch used this opportunity to validate his whole filming philosophy (which mostly failed at the box office). 18 hours of "stuff" with no real meaning, dragging the devoted viewer into dead-ends just to tell us that "some things are better left unsaid". I would have NO PROBLEM with that, if the series was 6 hours long or less. There is literally less than actual 2 hours of core narrative that plays a role in the story telling. I honestly feel insulted.
  • Dozens neglected plot lines. Extremely slow pace. Long, pointless scenes resembling film school failed assignments. Contrived references to TP original series. Missing context for many scenes. Continuity nonexistent. Random musical performances. . . . . The thousands of perfect 10 ratings are clearly fraudulent. We deserve better.
  • Just saw all of the nineties episodes. This whole debacle really started with the last episode of season 2. It didn't make much sense and the over all quality was really poor. Now, after 3 episodes, I am baffled. Completely nonsensical story to put it mildly.The dialog ,so far, is absolute gibberish and incoherent nonsense. I have taken pride in being able to watch just about everything at least once but no more. This might be the worst she*t ever televised!
  • It's finally here! And the first 2 hour episode of season 3 is an absolute joy to watch. When the original series aired, i was in my early teens, but i could still enjoy the show. I might not have understood all that was going on, but as it turned out, neither did anyone else.

    This was the magic behind Twin Peaks, it had no conclusion, like ever. It's the everlasting chase or hunt for something, that is never found. And once the murderer was revealed in the original series, the viewers left the show quickly, it wasn't suppose to be revealing. People watched it for the mystery, and apparently this mystery could have been stretched for 10 seasons, and people would still have been glued to their seats every time a new episode aired. The show was that captivating, more so than almost anything ever aired before.

    This was so different from anything else back then, no one had ever dared to make something like this, almost not even with movies. Actually the show was intended to be just a TV movie, but the people that saw it went ballistic, so they decided to make 7 episodes to air. But then the show exploded in popularity and got 10+ emmy award nominations and suddenly the show became insanely popular.

    It's kind of a mystery how, it was definitely not a show made for everyone, but still, it ranks as one of the best shows of all time. Why? What was so special about this show? Well you could probably line up 10 professors and movie experts to try and explain it, you would probably get 10 different answers.

    So here we are 25+ years later. The first episode of the new season has just aired, and i am thrilled. This was an absolute joy to watch, and it captures the essence of the original series really well. You can tell that Lynch is all over it, he has total control. And just as you would expect, it is bizarre, weird, mystical, scary and incredibly entertaining. And i have no idea what so ever what is happening.

    When i saw this first episode i thought of Quentin Tarantino a lot and how great he is at setting up conversation scenes with lots of tension, like the pipe scene at the beginning of Inglorious Basterds. Which is one of the best scenes in all of movie history.

    Here in this first episode you have this kind of tension in almost every scene, and the people could be doing anything. Eating donuts, checking voicemails, deliver packages, watch TV, have sex. Whatever, the suspense is with it all the way, and i have no idea why, because i have no clue what I'm watching. It's just there.

    This is one of the things that makes Twin Peaks so special, you are just along for the ride, no matter where it takes you, just enjoy the moment. Let it embrace you, it is what you want it to be. And this show does this better than any other TV show in history. The new season is apparently no exception. After the first episode I'm sold, when the song was performed at the end of it, while we see many of the original cast come together, that just sealed it for me, what a way to continue the saga. Absolutely brilliant film making.

    I can't wait to see the rest of it, this is quality.

    10/10 first episode - Masterful
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I very rarely stop watching a TV series if I still enjoy it after the first season, in fact a television show would have to seriously fail the viewer for me to cease watching as I like to know how a story ends. Well congratulations Twin Peaks, because I have never seen a rapid decline like I have in season 3. There is no fluidity in the telling of this story. Every episode raises more questions with no thought into solving them. The avant guarde attempt at looking into cooper's psyche in episode 8 however was the straw that broke this camel's back. People who applaud this cinematography are merely playing devil's advocate and kidding themselves if they believe this is entertainment. It was a nine inch nails plug for a song followed by a 30 min rendition of the video from the ring. Awful, just plain awful.
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