User Reviews (220)

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  • axapvov25 January 2018
    6/10
    meh
    First it seems like a haunted house trope, but no, then a ghost hunt, nope, then some kind of mystery thriller, but neither... It´s ultimately a grief film that drags on and on, relying exclusively on Kristen Stewart to sustain everything. It´s so subtle is almost not even there. To people who might make it to the end here´s a fine minimalistic drama that holds back from many clichés, a serious story, too serious maybe. There are a couple of great moments but it isn´t really rewarding. It just disguises a realistic drama as a ghost story, which is not the best idea cause it calls for an audience bound to be disappointed. I´m trying to like it but it´s just not good enough, it seems to add slightly relevant events just to fill the runtime. And it is confirmed, Kristen Stewart can´t smile. She tries at one point and it was like watching Wednesday Addams all over again.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I loved this film. I watched it twice and went back to the final minutes of the film, starting with the note telling Maureen to go to Room 329. Maureen goes to the Plaza, Room 329 with the bags of Cartier jewelry, She goes to meet the person who she suspects killed Kyra. In the room, she puts the jewelry on the bed, she then sees someone that we don't see and then, the scene fades to black. The next shot is of the hotel elevator and hotel doors opening and closing as if an invisible being is walking out. Is this Maureen's ghost/spirit? Was Maureen killed in room 329? It seems so. Back inside, the next scene if of Ingo exiting room 329 alone, leaving the hotel and being accosted by the police. He escapes.. From there to the end, Maureen is only a spirit. In Oman, she finally realizes that what has happened. "Is it me?" she asks.

    (Many commenters about the film seem to doubt that a Personal Shopper is an actual job. Yes, it is. There are personal shoppers in high-end stores that assist the wealthy as well as helping photographers, filmmakers and other professionals find the needed clothing and accessories for their project. Personal Shoppers also work for celebrities, as in this film. It's not an easy job because of the demands and responsibilities.)
  • I saw this movie a few days ago and have been haunted by it ever since. I am writing this review more to clarify my own thoughts and feelings rather than to try and influence anyone to see (or not see) it. I have always believed the sexiest/most compelling thing about a woman is her confidence, and, for me, Personal Shopper is the cinematic equivalent of that belief. I cannot remember ever seeing a movie so supremely confident in itself, which kept my eyes glued to the screen wanting to know more. Director Olivier Assayas managed to create a film that is so sure of itself it defies all genres, conventions, and expectations. He found a perfect balance between not caring what the audience thinks about his movie without alienating or insulting his audience with how much he doesn't care. No emotional manipulation or trying to cater to/please the widest possible audience here, which is so very refreshing. This is what he has to say. Take it or leave it. Love it or hate it. So, while it is not the best movie I have ever seen and has it's flaws, I am still giving it a very high rating for daring to be different. On a side note, taste in movies is extremely subjective, so I can understand and respect the reasons why other reviewers gave this movie such low ratings. However, I do not agree with the common practice of putting down other reviewers/calling them idiots for having different opinions. In a perfect world, I wish we could all just agree to disagree without being hateful/hurtful. Peace.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    If you would LOVE to watch Kristen Stewart spend an entire film sending and receiving boring anonymous text messages (which have zero relativity to the plot and character development), then boy ahoy you are in for a real treat here!

    I can't bring myself to waste much time on writing a review for this. The biggest takeaway from this film is that Kristen Stewart sends and receives a lot of text messages with an anonymous person on the other end. That's it. There's really nothing else in this film. It's not scary, it's not mysterious, it's not adventurous, it's not thrilling, it's not dramatic, it's nothing.

    Hopefully this helps you make your decision if you're considering whether to watch or not to watch.
  • mdhugs17 January 2018
    Warning: Spoilers
    An astonishingly tedious movie that you continue to watch in the vain hope that Kristen Stewart's character (Maureen, no seriously, Maureen!), who resembles more a street junkie than an angst-ridden bereaved sister, washes her hair. Laughable special effects (hovering cups, things that go bump in the night etc etc) are coupled with the preposterous suggestion that somebody has chosen to employ and trust the incredibly surly, heroin-chic Maureen to purchase clothes, bags and jewelry suitable for a high-flyer. Occasionally Maureen takes her top off (which even as a red-blooded male seemed to me to be exploitative), tries the clothes on (after being told not to) and does some more exploitative solo-girl action on a bed. In between all this Maureen tries to contact her dead brother because she is a medium (possibly revised down to a small after seeing her topless). Eventually it all ends ambiguously. The 'arty' set love this film. Only because, and presumably that is why Ms Stewart agrees to take her clothes off, they collectively believe that if a film has a French director it must be dark, atmospheric and stylish rather than what it actually is: Pretentious, soulless and meaningless.
  • Just saw this at the 12. Zurich Film Festival. For me, what really stands out about this movie is the fact that you don't know where it is going. It was a stressful experience, but i enjoyed it nonetheless. Is it about something supernatural? Is it psychological? Is it ...? I've seen a lot of movies in my life, but rarely one that is unsettling in a very subtle way like this one. I was never really sure what to expect from the movie, and at certain points it was quite unnerving. Honestly at some point during the movie, i was JUST NOT SURE anymore where it was going, which was very suspenseful and at the same time very stressful, haha. Kristen Stewart, whose independent movies i like very much anyway(The Yellow Handkerchief/Welcome to the Rileys/Speak etc), delivers a great performance and really adds a lot to the mood, and you can really feel her psychological stress, especially in a very well done train sequence, and, well.. Telling any more would spoil the experience i feel, that's why i stop now. It's best if you don't know too much about the movie imo.

    If you want to see something different/unique, you don't mind a slower pace and you like it if circumstances are not always perfectly clear - this is one for you. 8/10
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I watched this one at the Thessaloniki film festival and I was once again impressed by the filmmaking skills of the Great Olivier Assayas, who is as self assured as anyone could be while writing and directing this cinematic riddle. But let's start with the basics. The film is about a young woman Maureen (Kristen Stewart), who works for an eccentric and spoiled celebrity, serving as her personal shopper, but also doing other irrelevant chores. Three months after her twin brother's death, who died from the same heart malformation that she has, Maureen still spends her free nights at her old family house, waiting for her brother to send her some sort of message from the afterlife. She believes that she, like her brother, is a medium and that she can have contacts with the spiritual world. But when Maureen truly opens herself to this world, whose very existence she doubts, her life gets more and more complicated and the boundaries between reality and what may be her dark fantasies (?) or the spiritual world (?) grow even harder to tell apart. The film can be interpreted as a parable about the way in which our belief in supernatural factors highly complicates our lives and after a certain point, as we begin to interpret even the most tedious and unimportant events of our routine as miraculous interference of a greater force or being. But even if you approach it plot-wise only, it is still extremely engaging and unexpectedly terrifying, as you are filled, like the film's protagonist, with uncertainty about the future. You simply cannot predict what is about to happen, because the film is like the mysterious entity that keeps messaging Maureen; it is impossible to safely say which its intentions are. What may actually cause hate and dislike towards the film from most people is how much it relies on the decisions of the audience. After the brilliant texting sequence, which had me on the edge of my seat, it is entirely up to you to say what is really happening. You even get to decide if a character is living or dead, real or unreal, which to my mind is thrilling, but to many a man it will be unimaginably tiring and pointless. But then there is a career - best performance by the electrifying Kristen Stewart and Assayas' masterful direction which, along with a script that demands attention and inspires countless conversations, render "Personal Shopper" an unforgettable experience.
  • I watched this movie, knowing very little about it beforehand, and I was left baffled by how anyone could make such an interesting premise result in such a mundane and tedious film. Nothing goes on for most of the movie, and when I mean NOTHING, I mean nothing. We get overly long shots of Stewart riding her Moped, shopping for clothes, dealing with her "friends", and smoking. So much damn smoking. When things do happen, it is poorly executed and reminiscent of a film students first project. The film does not know what it wants to be; a horror movie, a ghost story, a murder mystery, a drama, an art film. It tries to be an amalgam of all of these genres and fails handsomely at every single one. I just don't understand how this can happen. The director is competent, the script was serviceable if a bit simplistic, and the acting was not awful. How can these elements which would work in any other movie fail so incredibly in this one?

    One scene in particular stood out to me that describes this entire movie; Stewart's character is on a train on her way to London from France. She is receiving text messages from an unknown sender, and the exchange goes on for like 10 minutes. She moves from cart to cart, exchanging high school level texts messages with someone she does not know, and this goes on for 10 whole minutes. Who really wants to see 10 minutes of someone text messaging? It's poor film making, using technology to excuse a lack of creativity. It's the worst type of film making, and while this film is not awful, it really does not deserve to be seen by anyone. It is just not worth it.
  • silverspawnx11 January 2020
    Warning: Spoilers
    I've never seen a movie which treats the viewer with as much respect as this one. There is no exposition, no hints to make sure you can keep track of what's going on. Every conversation is written for the characters, not for the viewer. And the scenes of nudity - they are neither drawn out or overplayed, nor is the movie coy about them. Everything just is. It's truly extraordinary.

    Furthermore, the main character is extremely likeable. She's smart, direct, honest, open, and well-acted. With this directing style and that kind of protagonist, I would probably give it a positive score even if the story was completely boring. Which is not the case at all - the story, just like the rest of the movie, is unconcerned with tropes. Highly unpredictable, highly authentic.

    As you can tell, I appreciate this style of directing a lot. More movies should be like this. It might even be a 9 - I've given it an 8 because the watching experience wasn't mind blowing, but it feels like the kind of thing that I will probably appreciate more over time. The plot is definitely worth thinking about.

    Edit: I am changing it to a 9/10, and I think I figured out what the plot is about.

    At first glance, it is merely a mystery.

    At second glance, you might guess that Maureen died at the scene in the hotel. Ingo, who was probably also the one who texted her, has killed both her and Kyra. In the scenes where doors are opening and closing by themselves, it is really her ghost walking out.

    But this is a bad theory. Why is it bad? Because a theory should explain the strange things that happen, and this theory explains almost nothing. Yes, it fits the doors opening and closing. But that is the only thing it explains. It doesn't explain who texted her (they knew things about her that Ingo wouldn't know). It doesn't tie into the specter she encounters in her brother's house. And it doesn't explain the ending at all. Worse still, the one data point which fits well is contradicted in the next scene. She is clearly visible to other people. Yes, perhaps her soul is still here for a while. But then, why would she be invisible in the first place? No matter how you look at it, it doesn't explain the movie well. If this theory was correct, then the plot would be poorly constructed.

    Here is what I think really happened. Maureen is distraught about her brother's loss. A part of her can't let go. Because she is a medium, that part has taken on a form of its own. The specter is her. The person messaging her, it's her. The doors opening and closing - it is her, but it is the separate part of her that has been separate all along. Maureen didn't die. She's still alive at the end of the movie. The ghost she encounters then; it's her again.

    This theory explains almost everything. It explains why the messenger knew her as well as they did. It explains why it started right after the specter appeared. It explains why it wanted her to do forbidden things. It explains the doors opening and closing on their own, despite Maureen being visible in the next scene. And it explains the ending.

    Also, notice that the hotel room was booked under her own name. With this theory, this is literally accurate.

    It's not obvious what happened with Ingo. Maybe she made him kill her. But more likely he acted by himself, and then the specter decided to steal the jewelry.

    But despite this one loose end, it is the far better explanation. Most of what happens fits into it, the key moments of the movie obtain meaning, and the beginning and ending ties it all together. Her brother's spirit is still there; we see him at some point. He has emotional importance for her. But the one whom she encounters at the beginning, at the second scene in the house, during the text messages, in the hotel, and at the end - it is all the specter, who is a part of herself.
  • I have to admit that Kristen Stewart's performance makes up 80% of the entire movie. She actually manages to transfer feelings to others without even needing to open her mouth. The plot is unusual and interesting, the atmosphere tastes exactly like Europe. Overall, a good movie!
  • Warning: Spoilers
    This film was listed by my cable provider under the Horror section, and you wouldn't know it watching much of the film. It plays as a quiet, introspective drama, focused on Maureen and her interactions with some French people we gradually find out are trying to clear a house of a "spirit" while she is also trying to confirm that she's made contact with her dead twin brother.

    the film has a very "indie" vibe to it, with very little music and a lot of focus on Maureen's normal daily activities as a personal shopper to a French model (someone who buys stuff for her so she doesn't go out in public and get harassed by paparazzi and/or fans).

    rather suddenly, we get a horror sequence involving a ghost. Then Maureen is being harassed by an unknown person via text message. She communicates with them on a somewhat casual basis. Then suddenly the model Maureen works for is murdered and Maureen is very briefly a suspect before some man apparently escapes a poorly executed attempted abduction in mid-day. Then suddenly Maureen explains to her friend that some guy confessed to everything and she's off the hook.

    then she goes to either Oman or Marrakech and is confronted by a ghost directly. she asks the ghost questions and it appears to answer via bangs on the wall. it contradicts itself in its answers, then she asks out loud if it's "Me", and if she's actually alone, and the wall bangs in affirmative. Then the movie abruptly ends.

    It wasn't an altogether horrible movie, but the tone of the horror sequences were completely off from the rest of the movie, as if done as re-shoots to change the movie entirely. The ending also was completely inexplicable. I get the attempt to try to be esoteric or cryptic with a seemingly inexplicable ending, but this ending was not seemingly inexplicable, it was COMPLETELY inexplicable. Absolutely nothing in the movie preceding it in any way provided a basis, foundation, clue, or even a red herring that could possibly set it up.

    The ending was like something out of a completely different movie we did not watch, much like the horror sequences. I would have rather watched one of the movies (the horror or the quiet indie drama) instead of a soulless combination of the two
  • ckbray29 March 2017
    Warning: Spoilers
    I saw an advanced screening of this movie. It kept changing genres without really delving into any of them. Many scenes didn't even make sense at all. There are a few mentions that Stewart is a medium but she states that she doesn't even know if she believes in an after life. What??? She never successfully communicates with spirits. Scenes are disjointed and don't seem to have anything to do with the others. When the movie ended everyone in the theater just looked at each other and sat there bewildered. If I had paid for it, I would ask for my money back. If you do want to see it, wait for it on DVD.
  • If you're expecting to see a thoughtful addition to modern slow burning haunted house films such as The Others or Paranormal Activity, then look somewhere else. In fact, go and watch those two, they're great films, that reward their audiences with exactly what they were expecting. Sadly, the same can't be said for Personal Shopper. A film that not only gives away a major plot point in the trailer, but also has it contain about 80% of the scares. Seriously. Watch the trailer, nearly every "scary" moment is in there. Sadly, you won't realise this until you've watched the film right up to the abysmal anti climatic end.

    I've read other reviewers say they wanted to walk out at the 30 minute mark. I can genuinely see why. I have no problem with films taking their time. In fact, it's nice to just sit back and let a director flaunt their craft. THIS IS NOT ONE OF THOSE TIMES!!!! Everything is so dragged out. But it doesn't get us anywhere. We're subjected to a 20 minute back and forth text conversation, that does nothing, except make you want to check your own phone. It's a tedium that's not resolved either. We're left wondering who's on the other end of the conversation? In fact, I'm still not sure why it's even in there. It serves absolutely no purpose to the plot. If they'd left it out, you wouldn't have missed it. It's that irrelevant. There's also a brutal murder of a major character (but, if you've seen the trailer, you know who it is, and where it happens), but it's wrapped up inside 10 minutes, and not mentioned again.

    So that's the film, what about tween idol Kristen Stewart? Well that's where there is a slight ray of hope (albeit an emo friendly black one). Granted, she does do what people have come to expect, which is essentially look sullen and pout. However, that actually works here, as her character is dealing with a very recent death of a twin, who died from a condition she has, and may kill her in the same spontaneous manner. So as far as casting is concerned, she's a clever choice. It's hard to comment on the rest of the cast, as they fleet in and out so quickly, you'll struggle to remember them. Think Daniel Radcliffe in the Woman in Black, only instead of Kristen Stewart being surround by creepy toys with renaissance eyes, she's surrounded by real people who serve no purpose, and aren't given long enough to have one.

    As far as the supernatural element goes, it feels tacked on. The trailer lead me to believe that there's either a malevolent spirit chasing Bella Swan, and like Paranormal Activity, it'll get stronger the more attention she gives it, or that she's a medium who doesn't know it, and her day to day life is invaded by her unknown powers. This is not the case for either. Every time something spooky happens, it's treated as the norm, and nobody is overly phased by the fact that this girl is seeing full entities. Even she takes it in her stride. The whole thing ends up feeling like somebody filmed Kristen Stewart, then at the last minute thought "I like ghosts".

    If you want to see a decent haunted house chiller, this isn't for you. If you want to see a decent murder mystery, this isn't for you. If you want to see the girl from Twilight in nothing but little black pants, give it a go. For me though, this is a disappointment that rivals The Girl on the Train.
  • James_De_Bello14 April 2017
    6/10
    6/10
    Maureen (Kristen Stewart) is a personal shopper for big time celebrity Kyra (Nora von Waldstatten). She also happens to be a medium that know how to communicate with spirits from the other world and refuses to leave Paris until she gets a sign from her recently departed brother Louis.

    "Personal Shopper" is one endeavor in genre mix I had yet to see. The fusion of styles, ideas and cinematic traditions is fascinating and quite off putting at the start, yet it manages to entertain audiences with moments of true suspense and fascination even though it goes completely off the rails in trying to have any emotional impact or pay off.

    The film is a mixing of genre as much as it is a mixing of styles. We get these long uninterrupted shots that stalk Maureen through the house which she believes she is haunted and juxtaposes it to scenes that you would expect to find in a dark fashion thriller. This combination admittedly does give the film an inherent interest that never leaves it. The first hour or so of the movie is quite captivating in how unapologetically it brings together these various elements lacing them together with a quite arrogant use of jump cuts which result in a smart idea to link the fantastic with the mundane.

    Kristen Stewart is a very effective lead, she manages to paint layers of characterization onto this person and open up an emotional place that would have easily been lost in hands of lesser actors. Her work is probably why the suspense scenes work so well. It is amazing to see how in one moment you are following a fashion discussion and you're captivated by it and in the next one you're completely scared by an apparent ghost story.

    Assayas definitely has to get some credit for the structure in which the horror scenes are built, whilst he has some major problems in tackling the genre, the scenes of suspense work perfectly because of a true mastery on the technical aspect. The elements introduced are synthetic and effective and they are juggled around in a perfect attempt at audience manipulation. Moreover he manages to get a couple of really amazing and suspenseful stable shots that I won't spoil, but really stick out as gems of the technical proficiency of the film.

    Unfortunately there are many story points and and emotional beats of the film that have almost no context or relevance to character here. Assayas has many problems in building the supernatural and there is lots that is either left for blatant exposition or not explained at all and left in a weird place of misunderstanding. The closure of the picture suffers immensely from this and all of the fancy genre stuff does not come together in an ending that leaves the audience completely cold and clueless on what emotions to feel.

    Overall the film has some very brave ideas and motifs, but the intention behind it leaves the audience scratching their head.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Personal Shopper is both a ghost story with bits of horror, and a mystery movie in the world of high fashion. From the same director who directed Clouds of Sils Maria, which won Kristen Stewart her coveted César award (the French equivalent of an Oscar) for best supporting actress, comes a movie about Kristen Stewart, a medium who lives in France as a personal shopper for a famous model. She is living in Paris because her brother recently died there and she is trying to communicate with him. Both supernatural and psychological, this movie, surprisingly, had me at the edge of my seat.

    Kristin Stewart was a standout in this film. As much as I don't like her, she is continuing to grow on me every time I see her in something that isn't Twilight. Most of the movie is of her just alone and that is the sense that is given to you. She is alone in Paris trying to deal with the grief and loss of her brother all the while working for a woman she does not like at all. The script is perfect for Kristen and some of her strange acting like being jittery or aloof is perfect for this role as a skeptical medium.

    There was not a lot of sound used in the film when it comes to a score but when the music plays it really enhances the film. There are also a lot of fade out scenes that is not something you often see but enhanced the mystery of the movie as it seemed like a lot of questions were going unanswered. There is also a lot of texting in the movie between Kristen and an unknown person who at the end of the film will have you wondering who exactly it was. This was brilliant in many regards to show how alone she was and also how much of communication is done over text these days.

    What I really enjoyed about this movie is while it was very artsy, it was not afraid to get spooky. There are some scenes with ghosts that are very horrifying but are played for the sake of the story and not at all for sight scares. There are only a few ghost scenes as well and by the end of the movie I was clamoring for more but happy that they didn't over stay their welcome.

    This was a great movie and I would recommend to anyone who is a fan of Kristen Stewart or of mystery movies. It's also a good flick for supernatural fans or fans of mediums, art, and Paris.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Amongst the things I'm not overly fond of, I'd put shopping and fashion fairly high up the list. However, having read some rave 5-star reviews for Personal Shopper, with comparisons to tension a la Hitchcock (Bradshaw in the Guardian) as well as descriptions of a ghost story to make Lovecraft quail, I decided to give it a go. Oh dear.

    To get the good bit out of the way first, Kristen Thomas does give a fairly good performance overall as the central character, a haunted twin searching for her recently deceased brother. Which is a relief because the other characters are so thinly sketched, they might as well not be there. As is the rather confused and unsatisfying plot, if I can be so bold as to call it that. We are treated to a prolonged over-the-shoulder text message exchange fro the second section of the movie which I assume was meant to be gripping when, in fact, it's immediately obvious who is sending the "mystery" texts.

    The spooky spiritualism that's been introduced prior is largely forgotten here, as she dashes between Paris and London and back. However, at various points, the supporting characters are given clunky conversations about something really mystical man (clue: they're not, they're really bad "plot" devices that add nothing to the plot). I went from having a mild enthusiasm to a spreading boredom to wondering how a 100 minute movie was starting to feel like a 3-hour ordeal.

    The ending makes little sense whatsoever in the context of the movie and people were literally laughing out loud at the apparent presence of the dead brother showing himself by dropping a glass. Twice. The second time in a mountain hut where for completely random reasons, the heroine found herself. This is a sham movie, exactly like the sham seances it homes in on at one point. Very disappointing indeed.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I really enjoyed "Clouds of Sils Maria" and so I had to watch this one, too. It was screened during the "French movie week" in Berlin and so I got lucky to see it before January.

    "Personal Shopper" starts out as a kind of a ghost story. A dark old building, the main protagonist - Maureen, portrayed by Stewart - is alone, you hear steps and movement, creaking doors and so on. All the classic elements. Almost cliché. For the first 30 minutes it is nearly impossible to get the direction of the film, but in a good way. The pace is slow, there isn't that much of dialogue. Stewart basically carries it alone and she is brilliant the whole time.

    I don't want to give away to much, so I just say that things start to evolve. Assayas throws bits of back story on the audience. Tells about Maureen and her brother, her work and her boss, but also about mediums, ghosts, souls of the dead etc. Throughout the movie different characters voice their opinion about belief and disbelief in spiritualism. The good thing is, it does not matter to which group you belong to enjoy what you see.

    After a certain point the pace and the suspense grows with every minute, the plot takes directions I had never expected and when the credits rolled I was blown away. I guess this is the kind of movie that people either love or hate. If you are looking for a strong plot, a clear message, people actually talking to each other, this movie might not fill your needs. What you get is a strong performance of Stewart and a lot of uncertainty and confusion told in an amazing way by Assayas.
  • At times I feel giving this film a 7 seems generous, but overall it's probably deserving of that score. The story lulls around a bit longer than it should and I definitely grew disengaged during certain periods of the story. However, I do believe the core concept is fairly strong and Kristen Stewart's performance is as well;having seen Certain Women only the other week, I now find myself wholly impressed with her acting ability.

    Basically, Maureen (Kristen Stewart) believes her recently deceased twin brother is trying to communicate with her because they had made a pact that whoever was to die first would send the other a sign to indicate that all is well and they are at peace.

    The mystique of the film, as you might imagine, is if Maureen is engaging with a malevolent spirit or a peaceful spirit; her brothers spirit or even a spirit at all. This ambiguity is reflective of Maureen's own disillusionment with an unfulfilling career and life, as well as her mourning.

    Personal Shopper sort of falls between genres and because of this it doesn't really satisfy fully as a drama nor a mystery. For me, it plays best as a narrative on grief and a characters search for identity. In this regards, the film offers an original take on those themes.
  • There is no intellectual explanation to this move. The ending is vague because the creators had no story to begin with. I'd rather watch 6 hours of C-SPAN than re-watch this 105 minutes of boredom. Stewart's character? Well, I guess not caring about your appearance must mean you are really deep. I do not believe there was one smile in the whole movie. Just a side character? a worker or waiter? anyone smile in France? I don't write many reviews and I'm not sure I've written a negative one because I figure I've already wasted enough of my time on a poor product. A Ghost Story? I'll probably be haunted by this movie for a long time. Every time I watch something, I'll have to wonder: What if this is WORSE than Personal Shopper?
  • I normally like when arthouse touches on horror but this piece of crap didn't do anything for me. Neither as a drama nor a genrefilm.

    And the 30 minute scene of Kirsten Stewart texting is by far the most laughable non-cinematic experience I've ever had. The director needs o go back to film school.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    This movie is bad. Really bad. If you watched this movie and liked it, I seriously advise that you change your personality and life. The main actress (I deliberately don't remember the names of celebrities)just ponces around looking glum, to a backdrop of very little happening except for ghosts with parkinsons dropping glasses. Then there are these long scenes where she texts with a stranger, who is either a ghost or isn't, but either way they'e very boring. I would have blocked them by about the third text, just for being so tedious. Even the masturbation scene would put you off wanking. Seriously, who the hell are all the 6,000 people (to date) who gave this movie a mean mark of 6.5? Does the long-faced actress have 6,000 friends? Don't waste 105 minutes of your life - just stare at the wall for the same amount of time, I promise you that you will enjoy it much more. Jeezus Wept.
  • mduffy52122 March 2017
    I'll keep this short. Just saw this film. Reviews made it seem somewhat interesting. It wasn't. What it was was just awful - long, dull, boring, and worse, very, very, pretentious! I can only assume that the rave reviews here on IMDb were written by paid shills who didn't actually see the film (lucky them). I understand that folks reading this quick review don't know me either, but trust me on this - save your time and your money. I lost both.
  • Well, it seems that the director of this movie specifically made it with one noble thing in mind. And no, it was not to discuss the after-life, depression, loneliness, grief, etc.

    It was made with the sole objective to show again to the audiences a topless Kristen Stewart!!! Which is OK per se (she is not that bad), but not enough to fill the interest of the audience for more than the time her exposed nipples are shown on the screen.

    Other than that, the story is tedious, Kristen Stewart is irritating in her role (as usual, she cannot act!), characters are boring and dry, nothing scary happens, the alleged ghosts are juvenile and, of course, the film has no resolution at all (it is an artsy-fartsy film, right?). The director simply decides to leave everything hanging in the air like....the ghost of a bad idea!

    Unless you have a devotion for Stewart's nipples, there nothing much in it.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    I don't usually write reviews, though I read a LOT. After spending 1 hour and 45 minutes of my life sitting through this "film", I couldn't resist leaving my first actually review. So, without further ado...

    First of all, I LOVE scary movies, and was excited by this "unique ghost story" and that I might actually be creeped out... They just don't make them like they used to, amirite? Oh boy, was I unpleasantly surprised.

    Kristen Stewart is a weird actress. I never watched Twilight, but she seemed strangely uncomfortable the entire movie. I can't envision a person that actually behaves like that in real life. Also, her hair was SO annoying. Strangely oily.

    Moving on to the myriad of inconsistencies. What is up with the scratched cross? Was it just me that thought it didn't totally resemble a cross? She sketches? What does that have to do with anything? She's a personal shopper? What does that have to do with anything? Why does she act so uncomfortable all the time, like with the German guy?

    Then, the text messaging. OMFG. Like, she's not even a good texter. It's really annoying to watch her text. Also, what is up with the forbidden theme? That is SO random. It makes NO sense.

    Then, Kyra's death? I honestly don't get it.

    Her conversation with Edwin. Wait, he's American too?!? What a random kawinkidink?!? Also, why does he look like he's dead inside when he's talking?

    ZERO closure at the end.

    Honestly, if private messages, or responses to reviews, can be sent/posted, please reach out! If you rated this movie higher than 7, I would love to understand how your brain works.
  • steve-7358914 April 2017
    I was looking forward to watching another Kristen Stewart film that looked so good from the trailer. How wrong was I? The run-down cinema in Sheffield had a few problems so there were no trailers or adverts at the beginning, meaning we were straight into the film after ten minutes of apologising by the embarrassed staff.

    Get on with it I hear you cry! I have to write 1000 characters for this review so that's why I'm waffling..

    The film started off slowly.. very slowly. I remember checking my watch around twenty five minutes then I don't remember a thing. Yes, for the first time ever in a cinema I fell asleep!

    After an hour or so I woke to a nudge from behind because I was snoring. I watched for another fifteen minutes but it was so mind-numbingly boring I left the cinema and returned to my hotel room.
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