National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)

  |  Drama


National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017) Poster

America in the mid-1980s. In the midst of the AIDS crisis and a conservative Reagan administration, New Yorkers grapple with life and death, love and sex, heaven and hell.


9.1/10
287

Photos

  • Andrew Garfield in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)
  • Denise Gough and Andrew Garfield in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)
  • Andrew Garfield in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)
  • Andrew Garfield and Nathan Stewart-Jarrett in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)
  • Russell Tovey in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)
  • Russell Tovey and James McArdle in National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part Two - Perestroika (2017)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


12 June 2019 | TheLittleSongbird
10
| Reality and truth
Have always gotten so much pleasure out of going to see the National Theatre Live screenings at the cinema. There is a real sense of authenticity in the auditorium despite seeing it much more accessibly. They are also a great opportunity to see a lot of familiar plays, often favourites, with enormously talented casts, and they are an equally great opportunity to discover plays completely unfamiliar to one beforehand.

That was the case with both parts of 'Angels in America', the first part being 'Millenium Approaches' and the second 'Perestroika'. Just doing one part rather than both is a mammoth task by itself. Doing both parts, and with the same cast for continuity, is even more of a Herculean undertaking. Was not familiar with either 'Angels in America' part before seeing the screenings and am so glad about seeing them. Both parts are must sees as are the productions of both, an enormous amount had to be taken on and both did so brilliantly.

'Millenium Approaches' is more talky but is also slightly tighter and more taut somewhat, which some may prefer. Others though will prefer the more expansive and more imaginative approach of 'Perestroika'. Again, when it comes to quality of performances and stage direction though they are equal for the same reasons pretty much. Really appreciated that both parts make a difficult and sensitive subject accessible to anybody who wasn't born during the period depicted, or like me just missed it, and also make it remarkably relevant. It is a very serious and brave subject treated with respect and both productions managed to make something entertaining, moving and imaginative out of it without distaste coming through. The Ethel Rosenberg touch will either perplex or intrigue people, am in the latter camp myself.

'Perestroika' is a little more surreal somewhat in the visuals, bolder in scope and a little more imaginative, but it doesn't get over the top in that so the drama is never swamped. There is more breathing space in 'Perestroika', but the mometum is still there so one never feels the length. Whereas 'Millenium Approaches' is more philosophical, there is more of a theatrical approach to 'Perestroika', again without going overboard. The stage direction never falls into distaste or irrelevance and manages to make the storytelling and subject accessible while not trivialising, the emotional impact is felt and the relationships in both parts handled tactfully.

All the performances are superb, with James McArdle, Denise Gough and Russell Tovy portraying their conflicted characters with heartfelt charisma, Gough in particular.

Two in particular stood out. Andrew Garfield as the most developed character of both parts brings the right amount of camp and anguish. Most surprising was Nathan Lane, absolutely chilling as Cohn and proving that he can do more than just comedy.

Summarising, equally outstanding and both parts are must watches. 10/10

Critic Reviews


More Like This

National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part One - Millennium Approaches

National Theatre Live: Angels in America Part One - Millennium Approaches

National Theatre Live: Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

National Theatre Live: Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Arcade Fire: We Exist

Arcade Fire: We Exist

National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

National Theatre Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Queers

Queers

National Theatre Live: Follies

National Theatre Live: Follies

National Theatre Live: Yerma

National Theatre Live: Yerma

National Theatre Live: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

National Theatre Live: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

Air

Air

National Theatre Live: A View from the Bridge

National Theatre Live: A View from the Bridge

National Theatre Live: Julius Caesar

National Theatre Live: Julius Caesar

National Theatre Live: Hangmen

National Theatre Live: Hangmen

Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama

Details

Release Date:

27 July 2017

Language

English


Country of Origin

UK

This Week on TV: "The Flash," "Limetown," and More

Plan your week of TV watching with our list of all the new originals, adaptations, and "double" features you can't miss.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com