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  • Best acting performance by Jin Zhang , Dave Bautista and Tan Sri Michelle Yeoh !! The fighting choreographies were amazing with literally unbelievable yet beautiful moves . If you're in the right frame of mind and preferably with a bunch of friends , this film should be loads of fun !!
  • The best action franchise after Infernal Affairs (2002; two sequels in 2003) , this Ip Man (2008; one sequel and a prequel in 2010; 2013; 2015; 2018; 2019) universe represents nationalistic enthusiasm of contemporary Hong Kong Chinese citizens in general.

    It actually reflects gradually severing complaints against the rule of man in political and social issues in the part of China.

    This can be embodied through this UK colonial era and its official governmental corruption in crony capitalist crimes, especially drag dealers=mafias who infiltrate the ruling upper class, and they are highly camouflaged in the face of generous business society.

    Furthermore, their paid government officials are protecting their business. The antagonist role Davidson who played by the ex-pro wrestler Dave Bautista engages in that way, a typical Hong Kong Caucasian ruing class capitalist.

    Hong Kong's crony capitalism is consciously and indirectly criticised in this film.

    Respect for Cheh Chang New Martial Arts Film Tradition

    The main action line is the protagonist Cheung Tin Chi (played by Max Zhang) who was defeated in Ip Man 3 (2015) fights against drag dealer mafias in the bar district (Sis Ha and Tso Sai Kit) and Davidson.

    In short, this line is similar to The New One Armed Swords Man (Dir. Cheh Chang; 1971) in which the protagonist Lei Li (David Chiang) seeks a revenge for brutally killed friend Feng Chun-Chieh (Lung Ti) after lives a depressed life and low profile.

    The New One Armed Swords Man (Dir. Cheh Chang; 1971) in which the protagonist Lei Li (David Chiang) seeks a revenge for killed friend Feng Chun-Chieh (Lung Ti) after lives a depressed life and low profile.

    Action Design is new but Wiring Actors is too obvious

    In technical aspects, the only obvious flaw is that the wired actions among multi-camera sequences mostly wired robotically before actual jumps take place in physically acceptable moments.

    In other word, it wired the actors before the actual jumps by the actors themselves. Wired actions should not be overly used in this obvious way. Wiring actors before their own actual jumps is too obvious in this film.

    It hurts both realism and surrealism to the certain extent because it appears to be 'wire', a 'technic'. I did not see any other surface flaw in this entire film. The film production quality is the best among all Hong Kong films of 2018.

    Rule of Law versus Rule of Crony Capitalism

    The mostly touching plot of this film is the reluctant police officer played by Philip Keung arrests his boss, Davidson-paid chief inspector played by Brian Thomas Burrell after finding tons of drags in the last street confrontational sequence of this film. Chinese police officers finally recovers the rule of law by 'betraying' the colonial British Caucasian authority.

    This political positioning is correct and impressive even in the after 1997 Hong Kong society. It is the classical catharsis in films about colonialist oppression, such as Casablanca (1942). The will of the Chinese police officer (Philip Keung) embodies patriotic consciousness and enthusiasm of Hong Kong Chinese people. As the result, this spin off is superior than Ip Man franchise's any other films.
  • I watched the movie today and when finished I felt kind of mixed. From the trailer, I had expected something better. The story/pace is good and keeps you watching. The fight scenes looks OK, but seems like not edited well enough. But something was missing. I couldn't find the exact word/term, but I guess it is the acting and/or directing maybe that is lacking. For me, it was Dave Bautista that made this movie enjoyable. Good acting! He stole every scene he was in. Michelle Yeoh and Xing Yu were both decent. I cant' say the same for the main character, Zhang Jin. He was like too stereotyped whole the movie. Overall, if you don't have better options at hand, watch it and make your mind for this popcorn movie.
  • Amateurish... Poor script, terrible acting and stale stunts plagiarized from decades ago... Costumes are a joke when everybody in a poor neighborhood are dressed in brand new clean clothes, every single person, all the time...

    Flight scenes are like tango dances without fear of anyone getting badly hurt ... two guys will stand and posture and look intensely/admiringly at each other for far too long before a fight resumes (Sigh... They act like they should just hug and go get a room...)... All are super humans , a wooden chair smashed to the face is but a minor inconvenience...

    The bad guys try too hard to act tough with their over don't expressions and the good guys try too hard to look cool by being expressionless, both sides failing miserably...

    Not even worth watching on a free download... Your time is better spent sitting in a park watching clouds change shape...
  • But who cares with bad foreigners vs hobo master trope that keep used in four movies. The movies were intended for sadistic viewers who love to see the actors get beaten up in close up as close as possible. Ip man has always simple story with lack of depth but the stunts are not. So it is not for people who want deep and meaningful storyline because what this movie want to show is wing chun is all about breaking furnitures and crashing glasses. Furnitures have become the victim of gangster fights in hong kong and ip man movies keep raising the issues by breaking more furnitures, as if sweden colonize hongkong and they decide to attack ikea
  • One of the worst ip man movie, only ip man 1,2,3 starred by donnie yen can be considered as the real ip man movie. Ip man the legend is born, ip man legacy, etc is just low budget ridiculous story bad acting using ip man name. As for this one, the story line is so predictable, a big let down for the main character which almost on par fighting ip man yet having hard times handling a mere fighter
  • Honestly I didn't expect the movie to be that good since one of the prequel (Ip Man 3) went south, but I was definitely proven wrong. The fight scenes are decent, conversations between characters are kept simplistic and to a minimal. Although the movie has a typical hero storyline, there are little twists and turns which makes the movie interesting to watch throughout the whole film. In my opinion, this movie would not outshine its prequels (Ip Man 1 & 2) due to the simplism in storyline, nevertheless it is still an action-packed, fun and entertaining movie. Definitely would recommend people to watch it.

    7/10.
  • The interesting thing about films coming from one country or an entire continent is that the bad films have always looked the same with each other. My previous review was on a Finnish rock band movie that takes place in 1977 that nobody ever heard of and never will. I thought it was a good film at first but I found myself often falling asleep on several scenes, which proved the entire film pointless and it's only a quick grab of cash. However, I watched this in a airplane flight so it wasn't a quick grab of cash but I still didn't find myself even loving it to that certain degree. The movie before that however, was "Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy" which often got me bouncing around on the debate that the movie deserves a good or bad rating.

    Movies are often difficult to review for a beginner level critic who has no experience and says stuff at the top of their heads. I don't watch movies twice often, I don't watch bad movies since I still am afraid to even watch them, and I don't like watching American or European movies as often compared to Asian films and that's a big bias I have with movie watching. It's not a great thing, it's kind of an addiction to be watching the same emotional drama with the same emotional twist at the end. It's predictable when you only like watching films from a certain country or continent. I am trying my best to goddamn have the mood to watch European and American dramas more.

    "Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy" is a film that I would definitely consider an average. With it's obviously made out 1950s Hong Kong film set, people challenging the main character to a fight, the same shot to show the little kid get punched in the eye since the third Ip Man movie which I don't consider that good to bring back memories to a scene that is exactly the same as this. There are many things that I've seen from the Ip Man Trilogy that appear in this movie, making this no different than other films. The Ip Man Series has definitely become a monster itself, being forced by the audience to make spinoffs that could've been considered Ip Man 4 if it didn't have a different actor as the main character. The Ip Man Series was wonderfully fun and emotional at times to watch before gaining it's big critical success with Ip Man 3. To be honest, I first found about this franchise when the third installment came out on Blu-Ray. So I must admit, I did watch it when it was an all time high. But, this film is one you can obviously tell that the company itself just wanted to make for a quick cash. A film that earns the same quality as a Nikkatsu film 50 years ago in Japan. (Quite forgettable)

    Now I might get dissed here and there for my trash talk but please respect it because it's my opinion and this review should be in no way, taken as a fact but rather a way of viewing this film in my light. The movie still holds the fun action scenes and beautiful cinematography with the neon lights which I never seen in any other Ip Man film.

    With the fun visuals, "Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy" is a fun joyride if you don't care about watching literally the same Ip Man movie that you've seen years ago. After the third movie, I got tired with watching the same stuff from the Ip Man Franchise. If they do literally the same formula and the same clich├ęs and same parts like Ip Man is a nice guy, gang wants to fight Ip Man, the opponent is a mean person, and someone dies in the movie, I will NOT go easy on Ip Man 4 since I'm starting to get real bored with watching the same films. Audiences love this movie and I did. But, in a critic's view, you can't let the same movie pass by with a good rating all the times.
  • An epic tale martial arts coreography and a nice setting from the era down to the tiniest detail. A mandarin classic movie full of action pack carried by a good directorial overcome a lackluster acting from the leads(I have to give them credit for pulling off a brilliant martial arts scene btw) and mediocre script.
  • Don't trust the negative reviews. Just watch it. A lot of action involved.
  • I watch these films not for its meticulous detail in storytelling. Nor for its picturesque beauty. I watch these films coz they are labelled under the action/martial arts genre. That said, this film falls short of all expectations one would naturally conjure after the donnie yen headed yip man trilogy. Lots of wire fu stuff that i would always otherwise avoid. The inclusion of Tony Jaa raised my hopes considerably. But his action sequences are blink-n-miss. The action itself is not well thought of, planned, executed nor choreographed. The storyline... forgettable. Bautista's appearance is late in the film and the character is not developed one wee bit. He more aptly portrays a bulldozer in the action scenes. Overall, id pay to forget this film since i can neither get a refund nor get my 1.5 hrs back!
  • Michelle Yeoh did a great job. They all did. Whether you like the IPman series or just a fan of kung fu. The story had a few twists and turn and kept me seated throughout the entire movie. Imagine running out of Milk Duds without going for a refill! I've always been a fan of kung fu movies. From watching the earlier ones on a Saturday afternoon up to even more when I grew up and got a satellite.

    The Shaw Brothers made a lot of them and I enjoyed them all. It's funny to see Michelle in so many different rolls. From Crouching Tiger to Star Trek Discovery.

    I knew I recognized Dave Batista from Guardians of the Galaxy. He played a very good role.

    NOTE: ALL MOVIE MAKERS. ALL OF YOU. You show the credits to movies but never show a picture of the actor or actress along with them. If you are new to a movie or particular cast member you have no clue who they are. You have to look them up on IMDB, which is fine, that's what it is for but if you showed the picture with the names, I do believe people would actually stay to watch the credits.
  • The leading actor, Zhang Jin, is one of my favorite martial art actors. His movements in all the fighting scenes of this movie and all the other movies he played a role are top-tier textbook-like Chinese Wu-Shu, besides, he got some unique aura and charisma so different from the other martial art actors, making his screen presence very very outstanding. But this specific movie suffered several fatal weaknesses: First, a terrible lame screenplay with bad storyline, and It was further devalued by many clown-like supporting actors and a non-inspirational director. The fighting scenes in this movie are good but not great at all, 'cause they were all looked heavily and extremely staged; the choreographic arrangements were more like what we saw in the 70s' Shaw Brothers Kung Fu movies, just looked pre-arranged and staged. Then, the dialog, that's another fatal weakness, just horrible. Furthermore, the make-up works and the costumes also looked so fake and pretentious. The movie was obviously shot in a model streets and structures, they just looked so fake and staged. The ridiculous corruption of the British police in Hong Kong also looked too over-the-top stereotyped crappy.

    I noticed that Tony Yaa and Batista both played roles in this movie, but their roles were just too awkward, unnatural even irrelevant. They were just to play some ridiculous unnecessary roles in this movie. Michelle Yao played another somewhat key role in this movie, and the other female actor who played the woman who fell for the character that Zhang Jin played, she's just with a very unnatural face, definitely had some plastic surgeries, and her acting was so awkward and rigid.

    Watch this movie only for its heavily staged fighting scenes and Zhang Jin's unique aura and charisma. Other than these, not a good movie at all.
  • desdemon-429-51391927 December 2018
    Undoubtedly the best of all IP Man series! A must see for every Kung fu lovers
  • Great story line. Best actor. Worth to watch. Better than ip man 3. Bravo!
  • rmkertajaya10 January 2019
    Bad movie, bad story, bad make up, all bad. Bad fighting,
  • Master Z is an one time watch movie with good action sequences though the same can't be said to its storyline. Acting is okayish but not good. Dave Batista does his part pretty fine. If you are expecting it to be like Donnie Yen's Ip Man, you will be utterly disappointed. Nowhere close to his Ip Man trilogy. See it with less expectations you will be entertained if not amazed. Thumbs up for Action.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Legendary Wing Chun master and Bruce Lee instructor Ip Man is the gift that keeps on giving to Hong Kong cinema, as the man's teachings and influence are the cornerstone of equally legendary choreographer Yuen Woo-ping's period martial arts actioner Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy. On the heels of Herman Yau's The Legend Is Born - Ip Man and Ip Man: The Final Fight, Wong Kar-wai's The Grandmaster and Wilson Yip's Donnie Yen-led Ip Man trilogy - all released within the last decade - Yuen spins off Master Z from Yip's final entry featuring Ip's last challenger. Working from a script by the team that penned the trilogy, produced by Yen and blessed with Zhang Jin reprising his role as loser Cheung Tin-chi, all the elements for a swift, creative wuxia entertainment are present and accounted for, among them exciting fights, luscious 1960s costume design and So. Much. Property. Damage. Master Z may not do the business of Yip's trilogy, but a decent festival run and more than respectable box office in the markets where Ip Man succeeded is a given, particularly with Yuen's name (The Matrix, Kill Bill) attached. The only downside could be Ip Man overkill: A fourth entry in Yip's series is on the horizon. When Master Z begins, defeated Wing Chun challenger Cheung Tin-chi has learned a valuable lesson for his hubris and settled into a life as The Equalizer of '60s Hong Kong. Finally tired of the mercenary gig, he opens a humble grocery store and focuses on raising his son Fung. While making his deliveries one morning, Tin-chi has a run-in with a battered opium fiend, Nana (Chrissie Chau), and her best friend, Julia (Liu Yan), as the women are fleeing from drug-dealing thug Kit (Kevin Cheng). He helps them out, but it lands him on the radar of both the corrupt British police and Kit's gang. Kit is touchy about the lack of respect he incurs, chiefly from his sister Kwan (Michelle Yeoh, kicking ass in '60s bouffant), who runs the Cheung Lok triad their father founded and who wants to go legitimate. Infuriated by his public beat down at the hands of Tin-chi, Kit burns his shop and house to the ground. Tin-chi encounters Julia a second time after the fire, who in turn offers the two a place to stay with her brother Fu (Naason), owner of the Gold Bar on the innovatively named Bar Street. Yuen and action choreographer Yuen Shun-yi get things started at about the three-minute mark, when Tin-chi tells his mercenary handler he's done, and never really lets the film slow down. But amid combat and wire work, writers Edmond Wong and Chan Tai-lee efficiently set up the rest of the story, most of which anyone with even a passing familiarity with the genre will recognize instantly: Kit's a hothead who believes Cheung Lok needs to be expanding its illegal dealings, not abandoning them; Nana is a junkie and therefore as good as dead; the colonial police are the heavy hand of the ruling elite (whether that's a reference to the 1960s or now is up for debate); Fu is an honorable man who just wants to keep his head down and stay on the good side of big spending gwailos; Julia isn't married; and single dad Tin-chi has a son. Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy doesn't have much on its mind besides delivering on fights - and in that aspect it succeeds. Viewers looking for an esoteric portrait of a master can check out Yau's films, those who prefer a bit of muted hagiography can go to Yip, and the art house crowd has Wong. The film's tangential connection to Ip Man gives Yuen the freedom to mix up the tone and themes, and he does so in baby steps. No one is completely right or wrong in Master Z, but Tin-chi suffers no ambiguities. Zhang, who broke out in The Grandmaster and SPL 2: A Time for Consequences, finally gets a chance to demonstrate some swagger and sex appeal in his most engaging lead performance yet, and in a perfect world it would make him a bigger star; one that could fill the gaps in Hong Kong wuxia scene. Just as unambiguous is Dave Bautista's Owen Davidson, an American businessman in Hong Kong and in the thick of the heroin trade. Most nuanced is Yeoh's Kwan, who must navigate the lines between what's good for her business, keeping her reckless brother in check and loyalty to him. And the sometimes-awkward relationship between Hong Kong and its various overlords is summed up by the reliable Philip Keung as a cop who does as he's told until he doesn't. The film is technically sound (even if the production could only locate one period-appropriate VW?), though the abrupt ending is a bit of a letdown that smacks of lazy writing, and Day Tai's soundtrack is occasionally off the mark. Overall, however, the lush production design by Raymond Chan, Joyce Chan's swanky '60s costuming and some astoundingly clever set pieces - a duel between Tin-chi and one of Kit's thugs atop of a strip of neon signs, a brilliantly old-school four-way fight at Cheung Kok's offices, a whiskey glass tango with Yeoh - more than make up for any plot flaws, with the exception of the shameful underuse of Tony Jaa as a mysterious assassin.
  • Finally some Good kung fu based action movie. And this one has a good story to go with. Unlike many other kung fu based film which mostly depends on the action and doesnt have a good story to back with this movie had a great story and action.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Same old outdated hong kong kung fu plot, chinese always the victim, and with great power comes great responsibility ,that includes taking social justice via violence and brute force.

    As usual the british or every single white man in hongkong movies is the enemies here, they are pure greed, pure evil, even when they appears to be a good person but they still victimized all chinese, and chinese will be seen as weak for all eternity every evil chinese baddies are either working for the japanese or english.

    In short, chinese man regret his action, self realized the path of righteousness. White man of both civilian and government coop to sell drugs to make money, chinese gangster are slave to white man. One chinese hero using violence save the day. White man overthrown. Colonization is bad, good chinese wants freedom.

    I wonder how long can they still ride the oppress victim card in hongkong kungfu movies anymore. Is there no better script writer around? Donnie yen pre ip man works still makes these generic one looks pale in comparison.
  • I haven't watched any kongfu movie for a long time. This movie definitely brought back all the good memory of Jackie Chen's martial art movies. The fighting scenes are awesome! Really have high respect for all the stuntmen in this movie. There are many intense fighting scenes. I really enjoy those!
  • I like ip man movie is the best martial arts is a good movie
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Hong Kong fight master Yuen Woo-ping closes out BIFF with a spin on the Ip Man legend, starring heavy hitters Zhang Jin, Dave Bautista and Michelle Yeoh. Legendary Wing Chun master and Bruce Lee instructor Ip Man is the gift that keeps on giving to Hong Kong cinema, as the man's teachings and influence are the cornerstone of equally legendary choreographer Yuen Woo-ping's period martial arts actioner Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy. On the heels of Herman Yau's The Legend Is Born - Ip Man and Ip Man: The Final Fight, Wong Kar-wai's The Grandmaster and Wilson Yip's Donnie Yen-led Ip Man trilogy - all released within the last decade - Yuen spins off Master Z from Yip's final entry featuring Ip's last challenger. Working from a script by the team that penned the trilogy, produced by Yen and blessed with Zhang Jin reprising his role as loser Cheung Tin-chi, all the elements for a swift, creative wuxia entertainment are present and accounted for, among them exciting fights, luscious 1960s costume design and So. Much. Property. Damage. Master Z may not do the business of Yip's trilogy, but a decent festival run and more than respectable box office in the markets where Ip Man succeeded is a given, particularly with Yuen's name (The Matrix, Kill Bill) attached. The only downside could be Ip Man overkill: A fourth entry in Yip's series is on the horizon. When Master Z begins, defeated Wing Chun challenger Cheung Tin-chi has learned a valuable lesson for his hubris and settled into a life as The Equalizer of '60s Hong Kong. Finally tired of the mercenary gig, he opens a humble grocery store and focuses on raising his son Fung. While making his deliveries one morning, Tin-chi has a run-in with a battered opium fiend, Nana (Chrissie Chau), and her best friend, Julia (Liu Yan), as the women are fleeing from drug-dealing thug Kit (Kevin Cheng). He helps them out, but it lands him on the radar of both the corrupt British police and Kit's gang. Kit is touchy about the lack of respect he incurs, chiefly from his sister Kwan (Michelle Yeoh, kicking ass in '60s bouffant), who runs the Cheung Lok triad their father founded and who wants to go legitimate. Infuriated by his public beat down at the hands of Tin-chi, Kit burns his shop and house to the ground. Tin-chi encounters Julia a second time after the fire, who in turn offers the two a place to stay with her brother Fu (Naason), owner of the Gold Bar on the innovatively named Bar Street. Yuen and action choreographer Yuen Shun-yi get things started at about the three-minute mark, when Tin-chi tells his mercenary handler he's done, and never really lets the film slow down. But amid combat and wire work, writers Edmond Wong and Chan Tai-lee efficiently set up the rest of the story, most of which anyone with even a passing familiarity with the genre will recognize instantly: Kit's a hothead who believes Cheung Lok needs to be expanding its illegal dealings, not abandoning them; Nana is a junkie and therefore as good as dead; the colonial police are the heavy hand of the ruling elite (whether that's a reference to the 1960s or now is up for debate); Fu is an honorable man who just wants to keep his head down and stay on the good side of big spending gwailos; Julia isn't married; and single dad Tin-chi has a son. Master Z: The Ip Man Legacy doesn't have much on its mind besides delivering on fights - and in that aspect it succeeds. Viewers looking for an esoteric portrait of a master can check out Yau's films, those who prefer a bit of muted hagiography can go to Yip, and the art house crowd has Wong. The film's tangential connection to Ip Man gives Yuen the freedom to mix up the tone and themes, and he does so in baby steps. No one is completely right or wrong in Master Z, but Tin-chi suffers no ambiguities. Zhang, who broke out in The Grandmaster and SPL 2: A Time for Consequences, finally gets a chance to demonstrate some swagger and sex appeal in his most engaging lead performance yet, and in a perfect world it would make him a bigger star; one that could fill the gaps in Hong Kong wuxia scene. Just as unambiguous is Dave Bautista's Owen Davidson, an American businessman in Hong Kong and in the thick of the heroin trade. Most nuanced is Yeoh's Kwan, who must navigate the lines between what's good for her business, keeping her reckless brother in check and loyalty to him. And the sometimes-awkward relationship between Hong Kong and its various overlords is summed up by the reliable Philip Keung as a cop who does as he's told until he doesn't. The film is technically sound (even if the production could only locate one period-appropriate VW?), though the abrupt ending is a bit of a letdown that smacks of lazy writing, and Day Tai's soundtrack is occasionally off the mark. Overall, however, the lush production design by Raymond Chan, Joyce Chan's swanky '60s costuming and some astoundingly clever set pieces - a duel between Tin-chi and one of Kit's thugs atop of a strip of neon signs, a brilliantly old-school four-way fight at Cheung Kok's offices, a whiskey glass tango with Yeoh - more than make up for any plot flaws, with the exception of the shameful underuse of Tony Jaa as a mysterious assassin.
  • IP Man's opponent in the last movie moves to a new place in Hong Kong and runs a grocery store with his son. He has stopped teaching and practicing Wing Chun but he soon finds himself on the wrong side of a local drug/mafia gang and has to utilize his skills again.

    I didn't have high hopes for this especially after reading the reviews but I watched it so I could leave a genuine review for others. It turned out to be actually quite good apart from a few of the minors character's acting skills were a bit painful but I managed to overlook that. It was a kind of generic Honk Kong, Kung fu, by the numbers movie but even though it was 1 hour 47 minutes long I didn't find it boring.

    I think it has the right balance of fight scenes and drama and the story is engaging enough. The presence of Dave Bautista definitely helped breathe more life into it. I feel it's a genuine 5-6/10 so don't pay any attention to the 1 star ratings and reviews.
  • baekms7 April 2019
    I looked really forward to this movie, especially after the performance of Jin Zhang in Ip Man 3. But was so disappointed with the fight scenes: too much wires are used and at certain moments the movements are too much sped up. It could have been a great movie, but I had the impression not much time was spend in the fight details. Max Zhang's best fight performances stay Ip Man 3 and to me this movie doesn't add more value.
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