Explained (2018– )

TV Series   |  TV-MA   |    |  Documentary


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Explained (2018) Poster

A documentary series that looks to explore the big questions of today.


8.1/10
6,215

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Creators:

Joe Posner, Ezra Klein

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10 January 2019 | NobodysFool
Feminist, superficial, biased and agenda -based.
As many others have already explained, there is a painfully obvious bias to some of the episodes. Especially the gender pay gap, where it's evident the message is intended to conclude women earn less than men across the board, and across the globe. For starters, cultural norms play an enormous role. They even cited Rwanda as a case-in-point; where the men of the country are depleted by civil war, prompting a dire need for women in the workplace. They cite this as evidence the model can be applied universally. Right, so all we need is to eliminate men world-wide, and things will even out, seems to be the logic, but that's not the conclusion they attempt to present. Shoddy example.

Despite the episode's inclusion of women who defend the "pay gap", where they state many women prioritize family over career, which partially explains the divergence, the conclusion of the piece maintains that women are in need of more affirmative action to be elevated to the status of men. It doesn't explore nor present ANY evidence women receive less pay for equal work; which they do, in the west, at least; where wages are set for many jobs, male or female. Providing ample disingenuousness to this hit piece, Hillary Rodham Clinton appears as an outspoken advocate for underpaid women. At this I could only think: "Oh, please, you've received the exact same wage as any other government employee with the same pay grade, you have certainly had nannies to help raise Chelsea, and if you had became POTUS ... yeah, same pay as a male POTUS."

The episode argues men should stay home, too, and take care of their children, which is where the feminist rhetoric kicks into high gear. For starters, men are no more capable of taking time off work in the US than women, and infants are certainly more reliant on mother's milk than man's during formative years, a point hard-core feminists will counter (but they are not really into reason, nor men). Women want to be equal in all aspects, but it is a huge oversight of feminism to neglect that women bridle the burden of responsibility for infants men cannot - nor in most cases are designed to - carry during this period. It's another shame tactic with which feminists continue to disparage men. If you want to excel in your career, make six figures and sacrifice kids, ladies, don't have have any kids, it's that simple. Otherwise, shut it - both your mouths and birth canals - and stop blaming men.

When it's presented that women without children earn more than women with children, I just had to facepalm and say "duh" - they are likely hyper-focused on career, while those with family are less willing to work 60-70 hours a week, or sacrifice stability/safety in pursuit of career. Career women are not necessarily the greatest mothers, either, and in all fairness, plenty of men are not good fathers, when their career preoccupies the majority of their attention.

Slanted and highly feminist-driven presentation of the topic. Listen to Jordan Petersen for a more detailed explanation of how data is examined and measured regarding the so-termed pay gap, if you want a more nuanced, honest, and credible source.

After seeing this episode, I find the producers' credibility to be untenable.

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