Noughts + Crosses (2020– )

TV Series   |  Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Romance, Sci-Fi


Episode Guide
Noughts + Crosses (2020) Poster

Set in a dangerous, alternate world where racism divides society, Noughts + Crosses follows two young people Sephy and Callum, who are divided by their colour but united by love.


6/10
1,281

Videos


Photos


See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


10 March 2020 | deanlundie
6
| Alluring world-building but lacks nuance at times...
Some Positives:
  • The most captivating part of this series is the world-building. Right from the beginning, the music, costumes and architecture all were screaming that this is a different London to the one we know. These ranged from macro-level political differences, right down to micro-level quirks, such as the colour of a plaster, the weapon of choice for the police, or the styles of hair. These differences culminate in a cohesive backdrop in which the potential for dramatic tension and unrest is massive. In that sense, the production designer(s) have provided us with a welcome entry to to one of the biggest themes; how the power of a ruling class dictates culture.
  • Jack Rowan as Callum is fantastic. The soft-spoken and gentle nature that he brings makes it impossible not to empathise with his character. This must have been particularly challenging since this show asks the audience not only to suspend their disbelief, but to also completely reverse any external associations of race. We have to believe that white people are oppressed in this world, and the show does this through Callum. Rather than through grandiose displays of racism (i.e. no interracial marriages, no mixed schools), I find myself more sympathetic to Rowan's soulful stare in the opening moments of the show or when he is serving drinks to Sephy. Great acting and I'm excited to see where he goes
  • The romance is generally well conceived if perhaps a little rushed at the start. Some eye-roll inducing tropes arose but for the most part was fairly original and the main constant of the show


Some Negatives:
  • My biggest issue was with Jude, the brother. He seemed like an incredibly flat character. Even when placed in dilemmas that would typically lead to character growth or development of some sort, he merely continued on doing what he was always doing. By the end of the show, he was still the same, angry character that was introduced in episode 1. Why is he so angry? Who knows...
  • My next biggest concern was that I dont think the show ever really knows what tone to have. Is this a gritty dystopia? Or is it a romance? I dont think these genres are necessarily mutually exclusive, but i think that the show attempts to juggle these different tones which leaves one questioning the motives of the characters or the intensity of this universe. If this was a show first and foremost about displaying how the race of the ruling class permeates across society or the irrationality of racism, with a side of romance, i think this may have been more narratively interesting . Instead, we are given these strange moral epiphanies that Sephy gains from Callum that just come off as too on-the-nose
  • The actress who plays Sephy. She was okay for the most part, but at times I feel like she was a bit wooden? I'm surprised that some of the takes for her were used in the final show. Some of her deliveries were so stale and emotionless, which was quite jarring at times. I'm unsure if this is the fault of the director or actor

Critic Reviews


More Like This

On the Edge

On the Edge

Trendy

Trendy

Born to Kill

Born to Kill

Polar Bear

Polar Bear

Trigonometry

Trigonometry

McDonald & Dodds

McDonald & Dodds

Benjamin

Benjamin

Flesh and Blood

Flesh and Blood

Belgravia

Belgravia

Penance

Penance

My Left Nut

My Left Nut

Noughts and Crosses

Noughts and Crosses

Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama | Romance | Sci-Fi

Women on Set: Celebrating Directors in Their Field

Inspired by The Farewell director Lulu Wang's call to action at the 2020 Independent Spirit Awards, we celebrate women filmmakers working in their field.

Watch the video

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com