In the DC Comics, Mary Elizabeth "Bette" Kane is the original Bat-Girl and served as Batwoman's sidekick and Robin's counterpart. Growing up she would adopt the alias Flamebird (and later Hawkfire) in response to her counterpart's development as Nightwing. In the comics she is Kate Kane's younger cousin instead of her step-sister.

Ruby Rose was nearly paralyzed doing a stunt, as a result of herniated discs in her neck, and had to undergo emergency surgery and went so far as to post a video of her spinal surgery on Instagram.

Luke's glasses actually belong to Camrus Johnson. He wore them to one of his later auditions, and producer Caroline Dries liked them so much they eventually incorporated them into his costume design.

Takes place in the same universe as fellow CW superhero shows Arrow (2012), The Flash (2014), and DC's Legends of Tomorrow (2016).

Rachel Skarsten has already portrayed a DC Comics character. She appeared as young Dinah Redmond (née Lance) on Birds of Prey (2002), daughter of the original Black Canary. In the series she would team with Batgirl (Barbara Gordon) and Huntress (Helena Kyle- the daughter of Batman and Catwoman) in a Gotham without a Batman.

The Batwoman costume was designed by Colleen Atwood, who also created the original costumes for Supergirl (2015), The Flash (2014) and Arrow (2012).

According to Caroline Dries, the showrunner, the initial team casting for Kate Kane joked during the process that "[they needed] a Ruby Rose," but figured the actress herself would never sign on since she was a movie star known for appearing in big-budget franchises.

In the comics, Kate Kane/Batwoman was romantically involved with Maggie Sawyer, played by Floriana Lima on Supergirl (2015). The characters became engaged but DC vetoed their wedding, and the writers left the "Batwoman" title in protest.

Ruby Rose had an allergic reaction to the glue used to fix the Batwoman mask on her face. "About five or six days in it was like I was a pre-Proactiv 15 year-old child an then when I took it off I was like something out of a horror film."

Ruby Rose is the first actress to play the DC Comics character Kate Kane/Batwoman in a live-action production.

Conventionally for film and TV stars, tattoos are either artificially created or real ones covered up as needed for their characters, but all of Kate's tattoos are in fact real.

Luke Fox is the son of the Batman supporting character and CEO of Wayne Enterprises Lucius Fox. In the comics, he was also the second Batwing following the resignation of the original David Zavimbe, and was also part of the team that Batman and Batwoman created in Detective Comics for DC Rebirth. This is the first live-action adaption of the character.

DC Comics originally created Batwoman (Kathy Kane) in 1956 as a love interest to Bruce Wayne/Batman to erase gay subtexts seen between Batman and Robin. Five decades later, Batwoman was recreated as the openly lesbian character Kate Kane, now considered a LGBT icon and the one inspiring this series.

Greg Rucka, J.H. Williams III, and James Tynion IV (three of Batwoman's major writers and one of her most iconic artists) expressed support on Twitter for Ruby Rose's casting.

Bex Taylor-Klaus (who previously portrayed Sin on Arrow (2012)) expressed interest in portraying Batwoman, but ultimately didn't get the role.

Although she is a big comic book fan, this is Ruby Rose's first involvement with any comic book adaptations. She described landing the role as a "dream come true."

The concept of Batman leaving Gotham and Batwoman protecting the city in his absence, which received some criticism, was part of the story of "52", where Kate Kane debuted. Also in an example of Recycled Plot, the Birds of Prey (2002) series had the same premise of Batman's absence and a female relative protecting Gotham in his place.

In the pilot, the side of Wayne Tower that Kate scales is actually the side of the Vancouver Art Gallery, which was used earlier as Gotham City Hall.

Ruby Rose praised Javicia Leslie as a choice to replace her as the title superhero in the series, shortly after the announcement.

Unlike in the comics, Kate is a vegan in the show just like Ruby Rose is; this change seems to have been done mostly for practicality's sake.

Ruby Rose has a real-life tattoo of the White Rabbit from 'Alice in Wonderland'.

Several Chicago buildings can be seen in establishing shots. In the Dark Knight trilogy the city of Chicago also served as a backdrop for Gotham City.

On May 19, 2020, two days after the Season 1 finale, Ruby Rose announced that she will be leaving the series. The reason of her leaving was the long hours and difficulty of the work. The CW announced that same day that they will recast a new actress of the LGBTQ community in the role of Batwoman, but not as Kate Kane.

Jimmy Palmiotti, one of Luke Fox's co-creators, tweeted to Camrus Johnson that he was excited to see Johnson in the role.

Ruby Rose reiterated how proud she is to be the first a gay title character male or female of a live-action superhero series. "I think it was actually a beautiful way to do something, especially since that was the first time it's ever been done - the first time Batwoman has ever been played in live-action and that she was LGBTQ. I'm very honored to have been able to play her."

The confirmation that Kate would remain visibly Jewish in the series was generally approved of, though marred somewhat by the simultaneous reveal that a bat mitzvah scene was apparently cut from the pilot for time.

Because of public backlash towards her character's portrayal and feminism, Ruby Rose deleted her Twitter account and deactivated comments on her Instagram profile.

Alice's lover is named Charles ("Chuck" for short) Dodgson, the real name of Lewis Carroll.

Production assistant Amanda Smith was paralyzed while working on the set. According to the woman's GoFundMe page, Smith was working on set when a bucket of a lift lowered onto her head, trapping her beneath it. She underwent significant spinal surgery and currently cannot feel anything below her waist. However, there is hope that she will regain sensations in her legs with the proper therapy. Smith will be unable to work for the foreseeable future, and the money raised through the GoFundMe will help her get through this difficult time. The campaign had raised $34,380 out of a $50,000 goal.

After Kate truly becomes Batwoman for the first time in Episode 3, Caroline Dries stated on Twitter that Elseworlds fits in right afterward. The next episode features a reference to a breakout from Arkham.

Rachel Skarsten revealed in an interview: "I have a lot of fun playing the wackier, insane side of Alice. While eventually she finds her peace, I hope it's not for a little while, because I am having too much fun playing her as she is." "I wouldn't count on Alice being redeemed any time soon," she added with a laugh. "I think the writers are having far too much fun with her being bad. But it could be in the cards at some point. In the comics, actually, Alice does become Red Alice - a bit of a crime fighter/partner for Batwoman - but that's later. And also, obviously, there are many different delineations of the comics."

Kate is played by an Australian, Jacob by a Scotsman, and Alice by a Canadian.

The series premiered on October 6, 2019. The Batwoman "Rebirth" comic series was announced exactly three years prior to this.

The full name of Rachel Skarsten, who plays Alice, is Rachel Alice Marie Skarsten. Marie is also Beth Kane's middle name in the show.

Javicia Leslie is the first black woman to play the title character on a superhero show.

Ruby Rose spoke to Entertainment Weekly about her departure which was a complicated decision. While there were some factors at play, Rose noted that the lockdowns imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic gave her the space to really think about her life and what would make her happy. "You know, you have time in quarantine and sort of isolation to just think of that a lot of different things and what you want to achieve in life and want you want to do."

Rachel Skarsten's casting as Alice was well-received by many, including some who were not on board with the series beforehand. The wig remained a controversial choice for a while, but a lot more people got on board when the first trailer revealed Kate started using it due to her annoyance at being mistaken for simply being a returning Batman after her first night on the job, making sure Gotham knows a different vigilante, and a woman to boot, is their protector now.

This is John Emmet Tracy's second consecutive series based on a DC property (and airing on The CW). He previously played Enzo Lambert on iZombie (2015). (Years earlier, he also guest-starred on an episode of Smallville (2001).)

The car accident happened on the twins' 13th birthday (their bat mitzvah, in a linguistic coincidence) and Kate states early on that she has been looking for her sister for 15 years. That places their age at 28 when the series begins.

Every episode of Season 1 (excluding Pilot and Crisis on Infinite Earths: Part Two) has been named after a quote from 'Alice in Wonderland'.

Ruby Rose first took on the role of Batwoman for the Arrowverse's "Elseworlds" crossover event in 2018 and, shortly after her casting, Rose opened up about how getting the role as the superhero was very emotional for her as it allowed her to play an openly gay superhero, something that let her be for others what she needed to see on television as a child. "I get to be Batwoman," Rose said at the time. "I feel like the reason I kept getting so emotional was because growing up watching TV I never saw someone on TV that I could identify with, let alone a superhero. [Tearing up] I said I wouldn't do that and I've always had this saying, well not me, Oscar Wilde, which is 'be yourself because everyone else is taken' and so I always lived by that motto and the second motto when I came into the industry was 'be the person that you needed when you were younger' and I feel like one motto sort of led me to the other and I just kept crying about it."

Bruce Wayne's birthday is February 19th.

Dougray Scott bears a fair amount of resemblance to Ruby Rose.

Ruby Rose also is highly supportive of Javicia Leslie, who will portray the next Batwoman, the new character Ryan Wilder. "I think she definitely knows what she's doing and she seems fantastic," Rose told EW. "I think that honestly, I was so proud and so happy when I was told who would be replacing me. I'm just really stoked and I'm definitely going to watch the next season as well and see how it all comes together."

One of the new features of the new suit are the cowl that features natural, curly hair with red streaks, red gauntlets over the forearms, and shorter boots. The redesign also features new materials, featuring laser etching to create more visual depth and a stronger silhouette. During DC FanDome in September, Leslie hinted at these new features for Ryan Wilder saying that, as the first Black Batwoman, she wanted to celebrate her natural hair and curves. "Ryan's journey starts from a place of 'What can this Batsuit do for me?' But it's not long before she realizes the power of its symbol and what it can do for everyone else in Gotham City," said executive producer Caroline Dries of Batwoman's new look. "As Ryan embraces everything that makes her special, she adjusts the suit to fit her physically and figuratively. This meant creating a new body design and new cowl that was undeniably a statement that screamed 'powerful.' Maya Mani sent me her drawings and I loved it. The wig was something we never perfected in season one, and Janice Workman crushed it with this new take. Javicia and I saw various prototypes of styles and red ombres, and at one point we were trading our own iPad-doodled versions. Janice translated that into what we are looking at now. When I see it, I smile. It makes me feel inspired." Related Story Friday Ratings: World Series Gobbled Up By ABC's 'Shark Tank' And CBS' 'Big Brother' Leslie added, "I love the fact that Ryan is becoming her own Batwoman -- it's her style, her swag, and her moment! It was an honor to be able to collaborate with Caroline and Maya. I felt it was important that viewers could tell by the silhouette that Batwoman was a Black girl. With the form-fitting suit and beautiful Afro, we definitely nailed it!" "I was asked by Caroline Dries to design a Batsuit that was unique to the character of Ryan Wilder; as she is a highly skilled fighter, encapsulating her raw, athletic, and passionate nature was imperative," said Mani. "As Batwoman, Javicia Leslie not only brings a fresh perspective, but physical strength to the role. It was important for the new suit to define Javicia's commanding presence while showcasing her athleticism and allowing her the freedom to express the physical nature of Batwoman, all while looking ultra-cool in the process!"

Kate's motorcycle is a Harley-Davidson Sportster Iron.

Season 1 was originally going to have a full 22 episodes but On March 12, 2020, Warner Bros. Television shut down production on the series due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The fact of Kate Kane being Bruce Wayne's cousin was taken from the New 52.

After Ruby Rose's departure, Berlanti Productions and WBTV issued a statement stating that they are "firmly committed" to the show's second season. "Warner Bros. Television, The CW and Berlanti Productions thank Ruby for her contributions to the success of our first season and wish her all the best.... The studio and network are firmly committed to Batwoman's second season and long-term future, and we - along with the show's talented creative team - look forward to sharing its new direction, including the casting of a new lead actress and member of the LGBTQ community, in the coming months."

Much like her character who's a lesbian, Ruby Rose is also a lesbian in real life.

When Javicia Leslie was announced as the new Batwoman, Stephanie Beatriz, Jade Tailor, Daria Berenato, and Vanessa Morgan all wanted to take over as the character.

During DC FanDome, Javicia Leslie admitted that one of her biggest goals was to play a superhero. She makes history has the first Black woman to play Batwoman. Leslie, who is bisexual like Ryan, said it is an honor to play a character that is just like her. She points out that it is not common to play a character that represents the community that she belongs to. "It feels really powerful," she said. "With everything that's going on right now, this is what we need. We need to see representation." She added, "I feel like there are so many little Javicias that don't have voices I feel honored to be able to be a voice for my community." "Ryan's journey starts from a place of 'What can this Batsuit do for me?' But it's not long before she realizes the power of its symbol and what it can do for everyone else in Gotham City," said executive producer Caroline Dries of Batwoman's new look. "As Ryan embraces everything that makes her special, she adjusts the suit to fit her physically and figuratively. This meant creating a new body design and new cowl that was undeniably a statement that screamed 'powerful.' Maya Mani sent me her drawings and I loved it. The wig was something we never perfected in season one, and Janice Workman crushed it with this new take. Javicia and I saw various prototypes of styles and red ombres, and at one point we were trading our own iPad-doodled versions. Janice translated that into what we are looking at now. When I see it, I smile. It makes me feel inspired." Leslie added, "I love the fact that Ryan is becoming her own Batwoman it's her style, her swag, and her moment! It was an honor to be able to collaborate with Caroline and Maya. I felt it was important that viewers could tell by the silhouette that Batwoman was a Black girl. With the form-fitting suit and beautiful Afro, we definitely nailed it!" "I was asked by Caroline Dries to design a Batsuit that was unique to the character of Ryan Wilder; as she is a highly skilled fighter, encapsulating her raw, athletic, and passionate nature was imperative," said Mani. "As Batwoman, Javicia Leslie not only brings a fresh perspective, but physical strength to the role. It was important for the new suit to define Javicia's commanding presence while showcasing her athleticism and allowing her the freedom to express the physical nature of Batwoman, all while looking ultra-cool in the process!"

Ruby Ross told the Daily Mail in 2018 that the Batwoman role was a "childhood dream" come true when she first landed the part. Then she shocked fans by quitting the series a year later.

During a podcast with Comic Book Central, shortly after Arrow (2012) concluded, Marc Guggenheim revealed that it struck him during Batwoman's very first appearance in 2018's "Elseworlds" crossover event that Kate Kane was essentially filling the Green Arrow's role in the Arrowverse. As he put it, in colorful terms: "After we did 'Elseworlds,' I said to the powers that be, 'I feel like I just introduced my wife to her new boyfriend,' because in many ways, Batwoman is carrying on the grim and gritty mantle of Arrow now that Arrow's going away. It was very surreal."

Rachel Skarsten notes that Alice's tragic origins and possibility for redemption set her apart from the Clown Prince of Crime. "There are shades of the Joker in her, but the difference for me is that with the Joker - up until, obviously, right now, with the Joker film - we've never known really why he is the way that he is. He's really been evil just for evil's sake. There's nothing redeemable about him. There was no reason for him being the way that he was," explained Skarsten in an interview with TVLine. "Whereas Alice, in the comics, we knew her to be Beth up until she was 13, and then you see [her and Kate's] roads diverge because of this incredibly traumatic thing. And that's what's motivating her - her evil is coming from a lot of brokenness. There are shades of the Joker, yes, but that, for me, was the biggest difference."