osloj

IMDb member since July 2001
    Lifetime Total
    50,000+
    Lifetime Filmo
    1+
    Lifetime Plot
    50+
    Lifetime Trivia
    75+
    Top Reviewer
     
    IMDb Member
    19 years

Reviews

El túnel
(1988)

El túnel (1988)
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

The tunnel

El tunel (1988)

This is an exceptionally rare film that brings to light Argentine novelist Ernesto Sabato's El Túnel (1948). That novella deals with a painter who killed his lover.

Peter Weller is Juan Pablo Castel and he plays him rather well. At first he seems reasonable enough but soon develops an intense torment because his lover is nonchalant, laconic and placid. Jane Seymour is his object of affection Maria Iribarne, who is also fine. Her role is to be serenely free of disturbance from Juan Pablo Castel's (Peter Weller) nagging interrogations and that is the catalyst for his indignation. She shows a bit of her body, but it is not done tastelessly. Her subdued natural persona, although quiet, is willingly effective. Fernando Rey as Allende is barely even glimpsed at. He plays the blind husband of Maria Iribarne (Jane Seymour).

The direction and dialogue is what will hold the film together, since this is a psychological thriller, and although it is nothing outstanding or notable, I did enjoy the film. The film, to me, reminds me of 1980's neo-noir films with just a touch of erotica. Argentine novelist himself, Ernesto Sabato, is credited with the working of the dialogue.

For the most part, it is a standard and effective film that details the tortured soul of an insanely jealous man, who can not come to grips that his new lover may have other affairs or lovers.

I particularly liked a scene where Juan Pablo Castel (Peter Weller) wants to retract a letter in a post office, it is both hilarious and absurd because the post office worker does not want to return it because of "rules". He explodes, setting the scene for his ultimate downfall.

It is barely above average, and seems to be filmed in Buenos Aires Argentina.

The audio is horrible and I could barely hear the spoken English.

But it is of particular interest to those who like existential or psychological thrillers.

El túnel
(1952)

The tunnel
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

The tunnel

El tunel (1952)

This is an exceptionally rare film that brings to light Argentine novelist Ernesto Sabato's El Túnel (1948). That novella deals with a painter who killed his lover.

The film, to me, reminds me of 1950's noir films, with a touch of Luis Bunuel's 1950's Mexican films, which hinted at surrealism in certain points. El tunel has a few lovely black and white scenes where the painter Juan Pablo Castel imagines tunnels around him.

The actors are entirely adequate, María Iribarne is played by the beautiful Laura Hidalgo, who did not star in many films. Juan Pablo Castel is played by Carlos Thompson, who committed suicide in his later years with a gun in 1990. Argentine novelist himself, Ernesto Sabato, is credited with the working of the dialogue.

For the most part, it is a standard and effective film that details the tortured soul of an insanely jealous man, who can not come to grips that his new lover may have other affairs or lovers.

It is barely above average, and seems to be filmed in Buenos Aires Argentina.

The audio is horrible and I could barely hear the spoken Spanish.

It is of particular interest to those who like existential or psychological thrillers.

In Spanish with no English subtitles.

Play Dirty
(1969)

German Africa Corps
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Unlikeable characters, portrayal of the German Africa Corps as idiots and the wanton murder of Red Cross hospital personnel, not to mention a hideous rape attempt and later, murder of a German female nurse.

Well, there's not much to like here at all. The plot is rather idiotic as well. The ending, rather irksome and pointless, and yes, I understand that "war is pointless".

I didn't side with anyone at all except the people who got gunned down, either Brits or Germans.

If they worked more on the script, it could have been a decent flick. As it stands, it's vile and unfocused.

Charmøren
(2017)

The European Gigolo
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

A deadly dull, vacuous, and trivial film, The Charmer attempts to be both crafty and ingenious, yet it does not sustain any interest from an intelligent viewer. It follows Esmail, an intrinsically boring Iranian man, who is supposedly the most 'attractive man in any bar', with his one cheap suit and his 'suave' ways of sipping wine. Ridiculous is more to the point; women are sleeping with him at every turn, why, I don't know. Well, I do actually, it is written that way. A cheap trope. The sex scenes inspire vomiting so have a barf bag handy while watching the film.

He works at a furniture mover company and sends all his money home. You can tell right away this guy is two-timing a wife or lover in Iran. Esmail, the intrinsically boring Iranian man, meets up with a fellow Persian later, another dull waif-like woman who doesn't seem to eat much at all. Both of them use drugs, smoke and drink a lot. He falls in love with her and it all crumbles.

The director throws in the "racist European" stereotype in the form of some husband whose wife dived out of a building, but who also slept with Esmail, the boring Iranian man. No racism is written into the parts of the Iranians at all, thusly making it a cartoon-like portrayal of life. He goes back home, where we see two children and his "devoted" wife in Islamic garb. He gets the "moral lecture" from his Father-in-law while they smoke cigarettes. Then it ends as if we are supposed to believe because he's back home and adopting the state 'religion', he's a "good guy". He strayed a bit with Western materialistic ways, at least that is the camouflaged message here. It's really an unimaginative ending.

Don't expect much from this film.

The Glory Guys
(1965)

The Glory Guys
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

A near-tedious film about the "great" U.S. cavalry regiments attempting to fight the native American tribes. It spends most of its time in the town and barracks, with an idiotic side story plying two dumb oafs against some beautiful woman.

Most of the time is spent on idiotic chatter, oft-repeated brawls and military posturing. Unlikable recruits fill in the ranks of the unsympathetic characters. Especial to note is James Caan doing his awful impression of an Irishman. Slim Pickens, Andrew Duggan, and Wayne Rogers are just a few of the familiar faces.

The battle with the native American tribes is wholly preposterous, as it has them fill in the role of "cannon fodder" and nothing else. They charge rifles, sit on their horses and five of them get taken out by the aforementioned dumb oafs.

A stale and average Western.

Sierra Stranger
(1957)

Sierra Stranger
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Howard Duff stars in this bland and average Western that doesn't excite or entice much. He did quite a few of these commonplace Westerns. They don't have the stories that are very powerful and the direction is entirely conventional.

Still, I'll watch any Western.

Here he plays a cowboy who saves another cowboy and gets a 'stake' in a mine. But when he goes to town he encounters opposition and hostility because a few folks think he's a claim jumper (one who occupies illegally someone's property to which another has a legal claim).

He gets some help from a well-off man but then even that goes downhill when the guy that Howard Duff saved, robs and kills a stage and its driver. The well-off man doesn't believe his friend killed or robbed anyone. Howard Duff goes looking for him to clear things up but has to shoot him.

Don't except much. Not a complete loss though.

Reed, México insurgente
(1972)

Reed: Insurgent Mexico
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Reed: Insurgent Mexico

Reed, México insurgente (1973)

Insurgent Mexico is one of those rare films that are made that are literary, artistic and devoid of any obligation to the commercial interests of cinema. A film that is pure cinema. Some people may find it monotonous or drab, others may enjoy it immensely.

The film follows John Reed (Mexican actor Claudio Obregón) while he makes his way in Chihuahua, Northern Mexico with Pancho Villa "El Jefe" and his troops. The troops are a rag tag bunch, but valiant in character, brave and honest for the most part.

John Reed was later made famous by Warren Beatty, in the great film Reds (1981).

Nocturama
(2016)

Nocturama
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

An overlong and extended pretentious foray into the metaphysical aspects of violence, this film is not without its interest, yet it fails ultimately.

A group of youth, who seem to be idiotic, as well as without any clear ideals, wander what seems like forever in the Paris subways and streets. You can tell right off that they're up to no good. No one pays them any attention.

Bombs explode and they all rendezvous at some shopping mall. There they become even more disinterested and fatigued. More dull scenes fill in the gaps until the fateful ending.

Could have been a five minute film treatise, instead, Director Bertrand Bonello drags it to past the 2 hour mark.

Extras include Director Bertrand Bonello's 'short films', equally tedious, and an interview with another pompous and overblown Frenchman (interviewer) praising Director Bertrand Bonello's 'merits'.

Heilstätten
(2018)

Haunted Hospital: Heilstätten
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

An extremely annoying video (not a film at all) with youth culture written all over it. A bunch of morons, with no redeeming qualities except to destroy, harass and elicit juvenile emotional responses from each other, form the 'meat and bones' of what we see. They spend some time at a "haunted hospital". Their puerile pranks get weary after about 2 minutes. Lacking any intelligence, we really don't care what happens to them.

The setting is significantly eerie but put to bad use by the inept videographer (not a film director at all). Quick jumps, bad lightning (intended) and idiotic editing further drag this into the mud.

The ending is entirely absurd, preposterous and ludicrous. It does not deviate from the now-standard formula of "found footage movies" that now permeate the horror market.

Awful.

El asesino enmascarado
(1962)

El asesino enmascarado
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

The Masked Killer

El asesino enmascarado (1962)

Not much happening in this film, but it's a silly average type Mexican film. Not really a Western, since it's modern and has cars, but the men wear holsters and ride horses. A few notable Mexican actors like Miguel Aceves Mejia, Joaquín Cordero and Ana Bertha Lepe are in it.

The plot concerns a woman who goes to a town to buy a cantina; she has a midget, a lover, who is the "The Masked Killer" of the title, and a goon as a barman. They rob and steal and the sheriff tries to figure it all out. He also does a few songs for no reason.

It isn't terrible, just average and dumb.

In Spanish with no English subtitles.

Ventarrón
(1949)

Strong wind
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

Wind

Ventarrón (1949)

A hood named 'Ventarron' ("Strong wind or gale") escapes from the joint. He goes back to get revenge. This is a solid Mexican noir directed by Chano Urueta and it has hoods and dames alike.

It has a lot of men dressed up in fedora hats, overcoats, and "pachuco clothing". To be "Pachuco" is to be associated with club nightlife, splashy behavior in public, zoot suits, and street gangs. There's a pool hall scene and a nice scene towards the end in night with hoods at a bus station.

In Spanish with no English subtitles.

Los diablos del terror
(1959)

The devils of terror
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

The devils of terror

Los diablos del terror (1959)

Standard Mexican horror western that is tedious but also fun. It features some cool hooded men on horseback that resemble Mexican wrestlers. It also has the corny fight scenes and the "funny guy".

In Spanish with no English subtitles.

Convict Stage
(1965)

Convict Stage
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

Convict Stage is from 1965 but it looks like it is from 1955. Two violent bandit brothers rob a stage and kill everyone, including a woman. She dots down the name of them in the dirt, and her brother Ben Lattimore wants vengeance.

The mother of the bandit brothers shoots him a few times riding after them, but I guess he recovers.

The brothers are caught eventually and are to be hauled on a stage by a sheriff, from Prescott Arizona to Apache Wells, then to the territorial prison. On a the stage is the mother of the bandit brothers, who plans to help them escape, and a few others, including a white guy who talks like some Indian and has a name of "Paiute". Southern Paiute Indians were from Northern Arizona, Southern Nevada, and Southwestern Utah. I don't know about him at all, he's really annoying. They hole up at some ghost town and await the uncle of the bandit brothers to save the bandit brothers.

It's all average stuff but has some interesting black and white ambiguity going on. The ending is ludicrous though.

Long men kezhan
(1967)

A highly overrated film
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot analyzed*

Dragon Inn (1967) is a highly overrated film. There's a few things to like in it, such as the cast of weird characters, the desert of the setting, and the lush color. Other than that, it rambles on with too much tedious monologue.

There is also an annoying female who chops up swordsmen with ease. The fight choreography is average, inviting scrutiny. It doesn't sit well that they defeat an entourage of guards.

Still, it's worth a look.

De mujer a mujer
(1987)

From Woman to Woman
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

From Woman to Woman

De mujer a mujer (1987)

A strange film, and the audio is hard to distinguish. It deals with a few women who are suddenly enraptured by some man (he's a real cheeseball) arriving to their home. He sleeps with both of them, they are sisters, and they develop a dangerous relationship with him.

One of them goes with him on the lam, abandoning her children and husband. They rob drivers, drink with some dumb cop, and then she pleads with the man to kill her husband and sister. He goes back to the home one night and shoots, even the kids. Then on some ferry ship, he shoots her and himself, falling into the water.

In all, it's a blend of Venezuelan erotic cinema (the sex scenes in my version are cut-out), Bonny and Clyde romance, and crime.

There's not much to it, it's average stuff, but worth a look.

In Spanish with no subtitles.

See also:

End of the Party (1972)

La máxima felicidad (1982)

Verano ardiente (1971)

Appointment with Destiny
(1971)

Appointment with Destiny: Showdown at O.K. Corral
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Appointment with Destiny, Showdown at O.K. Corral (1972) is a really interesting look at the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona Territory on Wednesday, October 26, 1881. It features the narration of Lorne Greene, no stranger to Westerns (The Hard Man (1957), The Last of the Fast Guns (1958), The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (TV Movie 1987), Nevada Smith (1975) (TV) and Bonanza (1959 - 1973) ).

It is made to resemble a live documentary, as if there were film cameras at that time. The characters swat at the camera, or get angry at being filmed. It is also filmed in sepia tone.

Characters are also interviewed, one of them was played by Neil Summers, a crowd stand-in and stuntman that was in Death Valley Days (TV Series 1952-1970), Squirrel in My Name Is Nobody (1973), and stunts The Last Hard Men (1976).

It all leads up to the Gunfight, which is examined in slow-motion.

It's been hard to find, but it is now on a Western DVD collection.

Highly recommended for Gunfight at the O.K. Corral enthusiasts, Western film lovers and Western history aficionados.

Appointment with Destiny: Showdown at O.K. Corral
(1972)
Episode 3, Season 1

Showdown at O.K. Corral
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Appointment with Destiny, Showdown at O.K. Corral (1972) is a really interesting look at the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona Territory on Wednesday, October 26, 1881. It features the narration of Lorne Greene, no stranger to Westerns (The Hard Man (1957), The Last of the Fast Guns (1958), The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (TV Movie 1987), Nevada Smith (1975) (TV) and Bonanza (1959 - 1973) ).

It is made to resemble a live documentary, as if there were film cameras at that time. The characters swat at the camera, or get angry at being filmed. It is also filmed in sepia tone.

Characters are also interviewed, one of them was played by Neil Summers, a crowd stand-in and stuntman that was in Death Valley Days (TV Series 1952-1970), Squirrel in My Name Is Nobody (1973), and stunts The Last Hard Men (1976).

It all leads up to the Gunfight, which is examined in slow-motion.

It's been hard to find, but it is now on a Western DVD collection.

Highly recommended for Gunfight at the O.K. Corral enthusiasts, Western film lovers and Western history aficionados.

The Legend of Custer
(1968)

The Legend of Musterd
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The Legend of Custer (1968) has a terribly written script and that makes it bog down to the point of ridiculousness. Unintentionally, it almost seems like a parody it is so ill-fittingly awful. But I think they were serious about elevating Gen. George Armstrong Custer from his reputation downfall.

Putting the stiff actor Wayne Maunder as Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer hampers it even more. Custer is an asinine man. The man is obviously a boisterous braggart and annoying. Richard Mulligan also played Gen. George Armstrong Custer in Little Big Man (1970) with much better effect.

Here he arrives at some fort and attempts to straighten up the place, brandishing his stiff sense of "order" to an unruly cavalry regiment. He also tries to capture or kill his much-hated Oglala Lakota rival Crazy Horse (actor Michael Dante). Michael Dante you'll recognize from "Star Trek" as Maab (1967), Apache Rifles (1964), and as a Blackfoot Chief in Winterhawk (1975).

The scenes with the Native Americans are pathetic. Custer rides his horse through a group of Blackfeet Indians and shoots about five of them. Crazy Horse gets captured by Blackfeet Indians and then Custer wants to rescue him, but afterwards he wants to kill him.

The small plot involves Crazy Horse meeting with a Kiowa Indian chief (actor Rodolfo Acosta, who always played an Apache Indian in many films) who is buying up rifles.

One scene which will make you laugh is when Custer shoots an injured bear and a rock avalanche traps him. The rocks get "neatly" stacked up somehow.

If you like Westerns you'll want to see this, but don't expect much.

The Outcasts
(1968)

The Outcasts
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The Outcasts was such a good TV western, I wish it had lasted a few more years.

It takes two bounty hunters, who are at times against each other, and other times, with each other and puts them in difficult situations. They travel the West searching for wanted men. I think the rivalry really works in this show and it is very caustic and cynical. Something very refreshing to see for the time.

Don Murray (Bus Stop (1956), The Plainsman (1966), and These Thousand Hills (1959)) was always a fabulous actor. Otis Young as Jemal was also in The Last Detail (1973) with Jack Nicholson.

The music was really exciting, Hugo Montenegro did it.

Some of the writing was corny, particularly the American Indian episodes. They make it seem like they are idiotic, and can't hunt two men on foot (The Apache Indian episode). By the way, the actor Robert Phillips (he played pro football for the Chicago Bears and the Washington Redskins), who played an Apache Indian in this episode, also played the same Apache Indian in "Kung Fu" The Predators (1974), and Mackenna's Gold (1969). "A Time of Darkness" episode also makes the attacking Indians so inept as to not be able to kill two men in a cave.

Nonetheless, I really "The Outcasts" when it came on in 1968.

Las cautivas
(1973)

The Captives
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

The Captives

Las cautivas (1973)

An unusual film, it reminds me of an unusual blending of Luis Bunuel and Pier Paolo Pasolini plus some Marxist subtext. The credits have it as being from a Carlos Fuentes (Mexican novelist) story.

At the start, a young woman gets picked up by two lecherous and drunk men in a car. They all go to some music club, trying to get her to a motel room. All of a sudden, the young woman starts yelling that her cigarette lighter has been stolen. It's an absurd scene and contrived, since loud music and dancing is occurring, but the whole room gets quiet. She asks for a police officer and they arrive instantly.

Then it cuts to some wealthy villa where it turns out the young woman is a housemaid to some spoiled and dull woman. Her wealthy husband has recently died, and we later learn that the wealthy young woman may have poisoned him. She also has a lover played by Jorge Rivero.

Jorge Rivero was a Mexican actor who appeared in a few American movies (The Last Hard Men (1976), Rio Lobo (1970), Soldier Blue (1970)). He was a weightlifter and starred in a few "El Santo" movies and plenty of low budget films like Pistoleros de la frontera (1967), Manaos (1979) and Evil Eye (1975).

The housemaid, who seems delusional and extremely jealous of being in a lowly position, blackmails the wealthy young woman, telling her that she has a cup that has poison residue in it. If she doesn't get what she wants, she will turn it in to the police.

Hence, roles are reversed and the wealthy young woman is at her mercy. She becomes her housemaid, while spiraling further into depression. She is also taking poison, and writing a note that incriminates the housemaid.

Later, more deception and double meaning happen, as Jorge Rivero was involved all along with the young woman housemaid, but then he sells her under the bus when police arrive at the house.

The end shot is duplicitous Jorge Rivero and the wealthy young woman at some picnic, and the camera focuses on the cup, signifying that he might be poisoning her.

Although there are some interesting dynamics, the film is largely average. But nonetheless it is an amusing film from the era. It has a 1960's keyboard track that is overused, and a music club scene as well.

In Spanish with no subtitles.

See also:

End of the Party (1972)

La máxima felicidad (1982)

Verano ardiente (1971)

A Boatload of Wild Irishmen
(2010)

A Boatload of Wild Gaelics
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

The cover is interesting, since from far away it reminds me of an Akira Kurosawa film, with Toshiro Mifune pushing a boat. But if you look at it more closely, it's a guy with a Gaelic beret hat.

A Boatload of Wild Irishmen deals with the life and films of Robert Flaherty, who was Gaelic himself. Cinema connoisseurs will know him mainly from Nanook of the North (1922). Also here, they discuss Moana (1926), set in the Samoan Seas, and Man of Aran (1934), which is the very cover of the DVD.

It's very fascinating, as they mention how Robert Flaherty was one of the first documentary filmmakers, but he also did set-ups of his shots.

After Nanook of the North (1922) he got a few big offers, but he lingered on shooting too much film that commercial studios didn't like. They also interview his old subjects, professors and some of the folks who were in the films. It's 124 minutes. I enjoyed it, since the subject is rarely discussed.

Includes three extras: 32 minutes - talk with filmmaker Richard Leacock (died 2011). Richard Leacock was a British filmmaker, he also was one known as a proponent of Cinema verite (a style of documentary filmmaking) and Direct Cinema (a style of documentary filmmaking).

14 minutes - thoughts on Robert Flaherty 10 minutes - the kid from Louisiana Story (1948).

The Lonely Man
(1957)

The Lonely Man
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

A few scenes come to mind in The Lonely Man (1957), a unique Western. It has Jack Palance, as a misunderstood gunfighter. Jack Palance's physique matches his laconic attitude. We don't know whether he truly is evil at heart, or a killer. We believe it at first, but then, we see that he is nothing but a fragile human who is going blind. He exists in the wild West where men will kill you for nothing. He has merely defended himself.

Townspeople want him out of their town, a few rivals want him dead. Anywhere he goes, he is treated like a pariah.

Jack Palance wants to find his son (Anthony Perkins) before it is too late. Anthony Perkins doesn't want anything to do with him, but goes with him nonetheless. When they get to a town, Anthony Perkins wants to simply go to eat, but Jack Palance says, "A man first takes care of his horse." That scene to me is stupendous, it is what makes Westerns so good. A cowboy who knows the ways of the West.

Elisha Cook Jr., Neville Brand, Lee Van Cleef, Claude Akins and Denver Pyle are just a few familiar Western actors in the film. This is a nice character study.

Conagher
(1991)

A Wonderful Western
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Conagher (1991) is a wonderful Western. The only critique I have is one, when the Apaches attack the cabin, they get killed rather easily. If you overlook that bad bit of writing, then this is a great late-era Western for any fans of the genre.

This is the reason why Westerns are so good, because they put forth a flawed man or some man in an ambivalent place. Sam Elliott is the main reason that I enjoyed this film. He exemplifies the Cowboy ethic, a tough, stern, but fair man, he'll pick the correct side, even if he is outnumbered or doomed. He is absolutely fabulous in this.

Barry Corbin as a Stage Driver, Paul Koslo as Kiowa Staples, a killer, Pepe Serna (Silverado (1985)) as a Cowboy, Ken Curtis (Gunsmoke (1955)) in his last Western, and James Gammon (Silverado (1985)) are just a few of the fabulous cast.

One scene has Sam Elliott attacking his rival's Cowboy camp and he has a chance to kill them all but he doesn't. He's not a killer. He's wounded, and then falls unconscious. The rival Cowboys also have a chance to kill him, but the head Cowboy says, "He's worth more to this land than anyone else." That is just great storytelling that tugs are your heart. It exemplifies the Cowboy way, the hardness they must deal with, and the rugged, yet beautiful land they lived on.

A very, very good film.

Hawk
(1966)

Hawk
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

I really enjoy all of Burt Reynolds' works, especially the early work that you haven't seen in years. Burt Reynolds came off from Gunsmoke to do this short-lived crime drama series. Too bad it didn't last longer.

The print I saw was really faded, and I think it would have looked a lot better in Black and White. In color, you can see a lot of the cheap lighting that brightens up the dark New York City streets in an awkward way.

Burt Reynolds was doing Navajo Joe (1966) at about this time. 100 Rifles would come out in 1969. Again, he plays a Yaqui Indian and a Navajo Indian.

Burt Reynolds did a lot of his own stunt work in all of his films. In Hawk (1966), he nearly twisted his neck a few times in jumps or somersaults. In Shamus (1973), they kept a fall from the tree that nearly killed him. He was a tough guy, I think that's why he was so charismatic.

Hawk (1966) reminds me of both Johnny Staccato (John Cassavetes as a private detective TV Series 1959) and Peter Gunn (Craig Stevens as a private detective TV Series 1958–1961). Both those are better than this.

Here, Reynolds was a police lieutenant, John Hawk, a full-blooded Iroquois Indian, yeah, I love that name. Spenser: For Hire (TV Series 1985–1988) later had a "Hawk", actor Avery Brooks, as well. Reynolds is a New York City special detective for the city's District Attorney's office. He even has a black partner, which was rare for the time.

Again, this is one of those 1960's "jazzy" private detective series, so you get the gritty look of the city plus some snappy music. Not all the episodes are great, but they are worth watching.

Something Is Out There
(1988)

Nothing Is Out There
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

A mix of the films, The Dark (1979), The Hidden (1987), I Come in Peace (1990), and Predator 2 (1990), it really doesn't do much with the topic involved.

First of all, the problem with Something Is Out There (1988) is the sheer time itself. On TV, this clocked in at 5 hours, and what a waste of time. I kept waiting for it to get better, but it didn't.

I like the corny intro and sappy 1980's music, but not much else is worthy in this lazy production. Even the creature itself is hampered by fuzzy and dark camera work that obscures it. Rick Baker did the work on it.

Well, the plot is layered with so many layers of filler, mostly the dumb cop arguing with everyone else. Family matters, his smoking addiction, and his relationship with the police commissioner's daughter, played by a dull Kim Delaney, fills the run time.

Robert Webber (12 Angry Men (1957), The Dirty Dozen (1967), and Midway (1976)) is the police commissioner. He's wasted in this sluggish production.

A space prison ship that has some "evil" alien that takes over the mind's of the other prisoners destroys the power of the prison ship. A medical officer is the only one who survives, and well, she's hunting the alien on earth. She meets up with an extremely unlikeable cop. His pal is George Dzundza. That's about it. They find the alien with relative ease. Throw in some stupid moments where everyone gets infected with the alien, and then it ends.

A lot of time is wasted on nothing at all, as I said, all they do is talk. What action there is doesn't have any dramatic effect at all. It all is a very tedious experience.

See all reviews